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I like to use the CPAN 'r' command for this. You can get into the CPAN shell with the old style:

sudo perl -MCPAN -e shell

sudo perl -MCPAN -e shell

or, on most newer systems, there is a 'cpan' command, so this command will get you to the shell:

sudo cpan

sudo cpan

(You typically have to use 'sudo' to run it as root, or use 'su -' to become root before you run it, unless you have cpan set up to let you run it as a normal user, but install as root. If you don't have root on this machine, you can still use the CPAN shell to find out this information, but you won't be able to install modules, and you may have to go through a bit of setup the first time you run it.)

Then, once you're in the cpan shell, you can use the 'r' command to report all installed modules and their versions. So, at the "cpan>" prompt, type:

'r'

 . This will list all installed modules and their versions. Use '?' to get some more help.

I like to use the CPAN 'r' command for this. You can get into the CPAN shell with the old style:

sudo perl -MCPAN -e shell

or, on most newer systems, there is a 'cpan' command, so this command will get you to the shell:

sudo cpan

(You typically have to use 'sudo' to run it as root, or use 'su -' to become root before you run it, unless you have cpan set up to let you run it as a normal user, but install as root. If you don't have root on this machine, you can still use the CPAN shell to find out this information, but you won't be able to install modules, and you may have to go through a bit of setup the first time you run it.)

Then, once you're in the cpan shell, you can use the 'r' command to report all installed modules and their versions. So, at the "cpan>" prompt, type:

'r'

  This will list all installed modules and their versions. Use '?' to get some more help.

I like to use the CPAN 'r' command for this. You can get into the CPAN shell with the old style:

sudo perl -MCPAN -e shell

or, on most newer systems, there is a 'cpan' command, so this command will get you to the shell:

sudo cpan

(You typically have to use 'sudo' to run it as root, or use 'su -' to become root before you run it, unless you have cpan set up to let you run it as a normal user, but install as root. If you don't have root on this machine, you can still use the CPAN shell to find out this information, but you won't be able to install modules, and you may have to go through a bit of setup the first time you run it.)

Then, once you're in the cpan shell, you can use the 'r' command to report all installed modules and their versions. So, at the "cpan>" prompt, type 'r'. This will list all installed modules and their versions. Use '?' to get some more help.

1
source|link

I like to use the CPAN 'r' command for this. You can get into the CPAN shell with the old style:

sudo perl -MCPAN -e shell

or, on most newer systems, there is a 'cpan' command, so this command will get you to the shell:

sudo cpan

(You typically have to use 'sudo' to run it as root, or use 'su -' to become root before you run it, unless you have cpan set up to let you run it as a normal user, but install as root. If you don't have root on this machine, you can still use the CPAN shell to find out this information, but you won't be able to install modules, and you may have to go through a bit of setup the first time you run it.)

Then, once you're in the cpan shell, you can use the 'r' command to report all installed modules and their versions. So, at the "cpan>" prompt, type:

'r'

This will list all installed modules and their versions. Use '?' to get some more help.