3 added 688 characters in body
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In plain english you're extending one class with another. A prototype can only be an object so you set WeatherWidget's prototype to a new instance of Widget Widget. If you removed the new keyword you would be setting it as the constructur prototype to the literal constructor function that which doesn't do anything.

var Appendages = function(){
  this.legs = 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = new Appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Understanding that the prototype can be any object, something like this would also work:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

In JavaScript, if the key isn't found on the object, it checks the parents object you extended it from. Hence you can change items on the parent object on the fly like so:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.
appendages.hair = true;
sara.hair;
// Returns true.

Note that this all happens during instantiation which means you can't just switch out the prototype after you've created the object:

var foo = {name : 'bob'};
var bar = {nachos : 'cheese'};
foo.prototype = bar;
foo.nachos;
// undefined

However, all modern browsers come with this newer __proto__ method, which allows you to do it:

var foo = {name : 'bob'};
var bar = {nachos : 'cheese'};
foo.__proto__ = bar;
foo.nachos
// "cheese"

Read up more on understanding JavaScript prototypes here. This article from Pivotal Labs is also really good.

In plain english you're extending one class with another. A prototype can only be an object so you set WeatherWidget's prototype to a new instance of Widget. If you removed the new keyword you would be setting it as the constructur function that doesn't do anything.

var Appendages = function(){
  this.legs = 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = new Appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Understanding that the prototype can be any object, something like this would also work:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

In JavaScript, if the key isn't found on the object, it checks the parents object you extended it from. Hence you can change items on the parent object on the fly like so:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.
appendages.hair = true;
sara.hair;
// Returns true.

Read up more on understanding JavaScript prototypes here.

In plain english you're extending one class with another. A prototype can only be an object so you set WeatherWidget's prototype to a new instance of Widget. If you removed the new keyword you would be setting the prototype to the literal constructor function which doesn't do anything.

var Appendages = function(){
  this.legs = 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = new Appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Understanding that the prototype can be any object, something like this would also work:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

In JavaScript, if the key isn't found on the object, it checks the parents object you extended it from. Hence you can change items on the parent object on the fly like so:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.
appendages.hair = true;
sara.hair;
// Returns true.

Note that this all happens during instantiation which means you can't just switch out the prototype after you've created the object:

var foo = {name : 'bob'};
var bar = {nachos : 'cheese'};
foo.prototype = bar;
foo.nachos;
// undefined

However, all modern browsers come with this newer __proto__ method, which allows you to do it:

var foo = {name : 'bob'};
var bar = {nachos : 'cheese'};
foo.__proto__ = bar;
foo.nachos
// "cheese"

Read up more on understanding JavaScript prototypes here. This article from Pivotal Labs is also really good.

2 added 544 characters in body
source|link

In plain english you're extending one class with another. A prototype can only be an object so you set WeatherWidget's prototype to a new instance of Widget. If you removed the new keyword you would be setting it as the constructur function that doesn't do anything.

var Appendages = function(){
  this.legs = 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = new Appendages;
var Sarasara = new Features();
Sarasara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Understanding that the prototype can be any object, something like this would also work:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var Sarasara = new Features();
Sarasara.legs;
// Returns 2.

In JavaScript, if the key isn't found on the object, it checks the parents object you extended it from. Hence you can change items on the parent object on the fly like so:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.
appendages.hair = true;
sara.hair;
// Returns true.

Read up more on understanding JavaScript prototypes here.

In plain english you're extending one class with another. A prototype can only be an object so you set WeatherWidget's prototype to a new instance of Widget. If you removed the new keyword you would be setting it as the constructur function that doesn't do anything.

var Appendages = function(){
  this.legs = 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = new Appendages;
var Sara = new Features();
Sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Understanding that the prototype can be any object, something like this would also work:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var Sara = new Features();
Sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Read up more on understanding JavaScript prototypes here.

In plain english you're extending one class with another. A prototype can only be an object so you set WeatherWidget's prototype to a new instance of Widget. If you removed the new keyword you would be setting it as the constructur function that doesn't do anything.

var Appendages = function(){
  this.legs = 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = new Appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Understanding that the prototype can be any object, something like this would also work:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

In JavaScript, if the key isn't found on the object, it checks the parents object you extended it from. Hence you can change items on the parent object on the fly like so:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var sara = new Features();
sara.legs;
// Returns 2.
appendages.hair = true;
sara.hair;
// Returns true.

Read up more on understanding JavaScript prototypes here.

1
source|link

In plain english you're extending one class with another. A prototype can only be an object so you set WeatherWidget's prototype to a new instance of Widget. If you removed the new keyword you would be setting it as the constructur function that doesn't do anything.

var Appendages = function(){
  this.legs = 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = new Appendages;
var Sara = new Features();
Sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Understanding that the prototype can be any object, something like this would also work:

var appendages = {
  legs : 2
};
var Features = function() {
   this.ears = 4;
   this.eyes = 1;
}

// Extend Features class with Appendages class.
Features.prototype = appendages;
var Sara = new Features();
Sara.legs;
// Returns 2.

Read up more on understanding JavaScript prototypes here.