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There is no array bounds checking in c c++. So if your allocated size is less than as many bytes as you read, there is no compilation error.

However, your program can crash any time or worst over write memory of some other meaningful information silently. Like mentioned in comments already, this is undefined behavior.

Lastly, 0 sized array's are a special feature of ANSI GNU c. They are used to accommodate dynamically sized data and would be allocated at run time withe the actual size with function such as malloc.

Zero length arrays

There is no array bounds checking in c. So if your allocated size is less than as many bytes as you read, there is no compilation error.

However, your program can crash any time or worst over write memory of some other meaningful information silently.

Lastly, 0 sized array's are a special feature of ANSI c. They are used to accommodate dynamically sized data and would be allocated at run time withe the actual size with function such as malloc.

There is no array bounds checking in c++. So if your allocated size is less than as many bytes as you read, there is no compilation error.

However, your program can crash any time or worst over write memory of some other meaningful information silently. Like mentioned in comments already, this is undefined behavior.

Lastly, 0 sized array's are a special feature of GNU c. They are used to accommodate dynamically sized data and would be allocated at run time withe the actual size with function such as malloc.

Zero length arrays

1
source|link

There is no array bounds checking in c. So if your allocated size is less than as many bytes as you read, there is no compilation error.

However, your program can crash any time or worst over write memory of some other meaningful information silently.

Lastly, 0 sized array's are a special feature of ANSI c. They are used to accommodate dynamically sized data and would be allocated at run time withe the actual size with function such as malloc.