2 added 151 characters in body; added 146 characters in body
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Hence it is n*(n-1)*2 which translates to o(n^2). Let me know if this is right ?

Almost: it's n * (n-1) / 2, not *2, which is also O(n^2). Note that o(n^2) (little-O) means something else, so the distinction is important.

This is assuming we're considering this as pseudocode. Language-specific implementations and smart compilers may be able to improve the running time substantially. For instance, a compiler that can observe that you're simply reversing the string might just do an in-place reverse, which is O(n).

Hence it is n*(n-1)*2 which translates to o(n^2). Let me know if this is right ?

Almost: it's n * (n-1) / 2, not *2, which is also O(n^2). Note that o(n^2) (little-O) means something else, so the distinction is important.

Hence it is n*(n-1)*2 which translates to o(n^2). Let me know if this is right ?

Almost: it's n * (n-1) / 2, not *2, which is also O(n^2). Note that o(n^2) (little-O) means something else, so the distinction is important.

This is assuming we're considering this as pseudocode. Language-specific implementations and smart compilers may be able to improve the running time substantially. For instance, a compiler that can observe that you're simply reversing the string might just do an in-place reverse, which is O(n).

1
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Hence it is n*(n-1)*2 which translates to o(n^2). Let me know if this is right ?

Almost: it's n * (n-1) / 2, not *2, which is also O(n^2). Note that o(n^2) (little-O) means something else, so the distinction is important.