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I understand the question a bit differently.

Taking a single language as an example, in C++, why would you ever use an arrayinstead array instead of an std::vector?

Sure, the vector, after compilation, will be an array perhaps with various guarantees, checks and ballances balances, but that's how I understand Xesaniel's question.

He's not asking why you would ever use an array in the underlying implementation, but why would you ever use an array up at the top abstraction level when writing your program?

Why not always at least use an std::vector if you were are in C++? In some other language use their resources for variably managed collections. If your language doesn't provide an abstraction like that, then write one and use it. In the case of an std::vector, performance isn't an issue becasue because when all's said and done, your compilation will contain an array.

Again, it will "be" an array at the end of its compilation lifecycle, but I think you should always use an abstraction level appropriate for what you arfe are doing.   In other words, get in the habit of using something other than an array.

Ride on the shoulders of Giants, people!

I understand the question a bit differently.

Taking a single language as an example, in C++, why would you ever use an arrayinstead of an std::vector?

Sure, the vector, after compilation, will be an array perhaps with various guarantees, checks and ballances, but that's how I understand Xesaniel's question.

He's not asking why you would ever use an array in the underlying implementation, but why would you ever use an array up at the top abstraction level when writing your program?

Why not always at least use an std::vector if you were in C++? In some other language use their resources for variably managed collections. If your language doesn't provide an abstraction like that, then write one and use it. In the case of an std::vector, performance isn't an issue becasue when all's said and done, your compilation will contain an array.

Again, it will "be" an array at the end of its compilation lifecycle, but I think you should always use an abstraction level appropriate for what you arfe doing.  

Ride on the shoulders of Giants, people!

I understand the question a bit differently.

Taking a single language as an example, in C++, why would you ever use an array instead of an std::vector?

Sure, the vector, after compilation, will be an array perhaps with various guarantees, checks and balances, but that's how I understand Xesaniel's question.

He's not asking why you would ever use an array in the underlying implementation, but why would you ever use an array up at the top abstraction level when writing your program?

Why not always at least use an std::vector if you are in C++? In some other language use their resources for variably managed collections. If your language doesn't provide an abstraction like that, then write one and use it. In the case of an std::vector, performance isn't an issue because when all's said and done, your compilation will contain an array.

Again, it will "be" an array at the end of its compilation lifecycle, but I think you should always use an abstraction level appropriate for what you are doing. In other words, get in the habit of using something other than an array.

Ride on the shoulders of Giants, people!

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I understand the question a bit differently.

Taking a single language as an example, in C++, why would you ever use an arrayinstead of an std::vector?

Sure, the vector, after compilation, will be an array perhaps with various guarantees, checks and ballances, but that's how I understand Xesaniel's question.

He's not asking why you would ever use an array in the underlying implementation, but why would you ever use an array up at the top abstraction level when writing your program?

Why not always at least use an std::vector if you were in C++? In some other language use their resources for variably managed collections. If your language doesn't provide an abstraction like that, then write one and use it. In the case of an std::vector, performance isn't an issue becasue when all's said and done, your compilation will contain an array.

Again, it will "be" an array at the end of its compilation lifecycle, but I think you should always use an abstraction level appropriate for what you arfe doing.

Ride on the shoulders of Giants, people!