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You are mot probably right. I can actually relinquish my use of the random access capabilities (is that how you call it?), and I don't care about the order of the objects. I just need to be able to add objects then iterate over all of them. Also, this is indeed a set (I don't need the same object more than once), but I will also never attempt to add it more than once... Should I use a list instead (although I don't care about the ordering)? What is the most efficient data structure for such a set?

A HashSet is implemented as a HashMap that maps the key to itself, so switching to a HashSet won't make much difference, performance-wise.

The other alternatives are a TreeSet, or (assuming that your application will never try to insert a duplicate) one of the List classes. If your application is such that a List will work, then an ArrayList or LinkedList will be more efficient than either a HashSet or TreeSet.

However, there is something very fishy about your application spending 50% of its time in hashCode methods. Unless the hash tables are resized, the hashCode method should only be called once per set or map operation. So either there is a lot of map/set resizing going on, or you are doing huge numbers of set add operations. (AFAIK, the Object hashcode method is cheap, so the cost of each call should not be an issue.)

EDIT

Is nextInt() really expensive? Any alternatives?

No it is not expensive. Take a look at the code. The Random class (and the nextInt() method) does make use of an AtomicLong to make it thread-safe, and you might save a few cycles if you coded a non-thread-safe version. The source code is in your JDK installation directory ... take a look.

You are mot probably right. I can actually relinquish my use of the random access capabilities (is that how you call it?), and I don't care about the order of the objects. I just need to be able to add objects then iterate over all of them. Also, this is indeed a set (I don't need the same object more than once), but I will also never attempt to add it more than once... Should I use a list instead (although I don't care about the ordering)? What is the most efficient data structure for such a set?

A HashSet is implemented as a HashMap that maps the key to itself, so switching to a HashSet won't make much difference, performance-wise.

The other alternatives are a TreeSet, or (assuming that your application will never try to insert a duplicate) one of the List classes. If your application is such that a List will work, then an ArrayList or LinkedList will be more efficient than either a HashSet or TreeSet.

However, there is something very fishy about your application spending 50% of its time in hashCode methods. Unless the hash tables are resized, the hashCode method should only be called once per set or map operation. So either there is a lot of map/set resizing going on, or you are doing huge numbers of set add operations. (AFAIK, the Object hashcode method is cheap, so the cost of each call should not be an issue.)

You are mot probably right. I can actually relinquish my use of the random access capabilities (is that how you call it?), and I don't care about the order of the objects. I just need to be able to add objects then iterate over all of them. Also, this is indeed a set (I don't need the same object more than once), but I will also never attempt to add it more than once... Should I use a list instead (although I don't care about the ordering)? What is the most efficient data structure for such a set?

A HashSet is implemented as a HashMap that maps the key to itself, so switching to a HashSet won't make much difference, performance-wise.

The other alternatives are a TreeSet, or (assuming that your application will never try to insert a duplicate) one of the List classes. If your application is such that a List will work, then an ArrayList or LinkedList will be more efficient than either a HashSet or TreeSet.

However, there is something very fishy about your application spending 50% of its time in hashCode methods. Unless the hash tables are resized, the hashCode method should only be called once per set or map operation. So either there is a lot of map/set resizing going on, or you are doing huge numbers of set add operations. (AFAIK, the Object hashcode method is cheap, so the cost of each call should not be an issue.)

EDIT

Is nextInt() really expensive? Any alternatives?

No it is not expensive. Take a look at the code. The Random class (and the nextInt() method) does make use of an AtomicLong to make it thread-safe, and you might save a few cycles if you coded a non-thread-safe version. The source code is in your JDK installation directory ... take a look.

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source|link

You are mot probably right. I can actually relinquish my use of the random access capabilities (is that how you call it?), and I don't care about the order of the objects. I just need to be able to add objects then iterate over all of them. Also, this is indeed a set (I don't need the same object more than once), but I will also never attempt to add it more than once... Should I use a list instead (although I don't care about the ordering)? What is the most efficient data structure for such a set?

A HashSet is implemented as a HashMap that maps the key to itself, so switching to a HashSet won't make much difference, performance-wise.

The other alternatives are a TreeSet, or (assuming that your application will never try to insert a duplicate) one of the List classes. If your application is such that a List will work, then an ArrayList or LinkedList will be more efficient than either a HashSet or TreeSet.

However, there is something very fishy about your application spending 50% of its time in hashCode methods. Unless the hash tables are resized, the hashCode method should only be called once per set or map operation. So either there is a lot of map/set resizing going on, or you are doing huge numbers of set add operations. (AFAIK, the Object hashcode method is cheap, so the cost of each call should not be an issue.)