2 added 103 characters in body
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With regular expressions, use a technique that I like to call tack-and-stretch: anchor on features you know will be there (tack) and then grab what's between (stretch).

In this case, you know that a single assignment matches

\b\w+=.+

and you have many of these repeated in $string. Remember that \b means word boundary:

A word boundary (\b) is a spot between two characters that has a \w on one side of it and a \W on the other side of it (in either order), counting the imaginary characters off the beginning and end of the string as matching a \W.

The values in the assignments can be a little tricky to describe with a regular expression, but you also know that each value will terminate with some optional whitespace—although not necessarily the first whitespace followed encountered!—followed by either another assignment or end-of-string.

To avoid repeating the assertion pattern, compile it once with qr// and reuse it in your pattern along with a look-ahead assertion (?=...) to keep stretch the match just far enough to capture the entire value while also preventing it from spilling into the next variable name.

Matching against your pattern in list context with m//g gives the following behavior:

The /g modifier specifies global pattern matching—that is, matching as many times as possible within the string. How it behaves depends on the context. In list context, it returns a list of the substrings matched by any capturing parentheses in the regular expression. If there are no parentheses, it returns a list of all the matched strings, as if there were parentheses around the whole pattern.

The pattern $assignment uses non-greedy .+? to cut off the value as soon as the look-ahead sees another assignment or end-of-line. Remember that the match returns the substrings from all capturing subpatterns, so the look-ahead's alternation uses non-capturing (?:...). The qr//, in contrast, contains implicit capturing parentheses.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $string = <<'EOF';
var1=100 var2=90 var5=hello var3="a, b, c" var7=test var3=hello
EOF

my $assignment = qr/\b\w+ = .+?/x;
my @array = $string =~ /$assignment (?= \s*\s+ (?: $ | $assignment))/gx;

for ( my $i = 0; $i < scalar( @array ); $i++ )
{
  print $i.": ".$array[$i]."\n";
}

Output:

$ ./prog.pl 
0: var1=100
1: var2=90
2: var5=hello
3: var3="a, b, c"
4: var7=test
5: var3=hello

With regular expressions, use a technique that I like to call tack-and-stretch: anchor on features you know will be there (tack) and then grab what's between (stretch).

In this case, you know that a single assignment matches

\b\w+=.+

and you have many of these repeated in $string. Remember that \b means word boundary:

A word boundary (\b) is a spot between two characters that has a \w on one side of it and a \W on the other side of it (in either order), counting the imaginary characters off the beginning and end of the string as matching a \W.

The values in the assignments can be a little tricky to describe with a regular expression, but you also know that each value will terminate with some optional whitespace followed by either another assignment or end-of-string.

To avoid repeating the assertion pattern, compile it once with qr// and reuse it in your pattern along with a look-ahead assertion (?=...) to keep the match from spilling into the next variable name.

Matching against your pattern in list context with m//g gives the following behavior:

The /g modifier specifies global pattern matching—that is, matching as many times as possible within the string. How it behaves depends on the context. In list context, it returns a list of the substrings matched by any capturing parentheses in the regular expression. If there are no parentheses, it returns a list of all the matched strings, as if there were parentheses around the whole pattern.

The pattern $assignment uses non-greedy .+? to cut off the value as soon as the look-ahead sees another assignment or end-of-line. Remember that the match returns the substrings from all capturing subpatterns, so the look-ahead's alternation uses non-capturing (?:...). The qr//, in contrast, contains implicit capturing parentheses.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $string = <<'EOF';
var1=100 var2=90 var5=hello var3="a, b, c" var7=test var3=hello
EOF

my $assignment = qr/\b\w+ = .+?/x;
my @array = $string =~ /$assignment (?= \s* (?: $ | $assignment))/gx;

for ( my $i = 0; $i < scalar( @array ); $i++ )
{
  print $i.": ".$array[$i]."\n";
}

Output:

$ ./prog.pl 
0: var1=100
1: var2=90
2: var5=hello
3: var3="a, b, c"
4: var7=test
5: var3=hello

With regular expressions, use a technique that I like to call tack-and-stretch: anchor on features you know will be there (tack) and then grab what's between (stretch).

In this case, you know that a single assignment matches

\b\w+=.+

and you have many of these repeated in $string. Remember that \b means word boundary:

A word boundary (\b) is a spot between two characters that has a \w on one side of it and a \W on the other side of it (in either order), counting the imaginary characters off the beginning and end of the string as matching a \W.

The values in the assignments can be a little tricky to describe with a regular expression, but you also know that each value will terminate with whitespace—although not necessarily the first whitespace encountered!—followed by either another assignment or end-of-string.

To avoid repeating the assertion pattern, compile it once with qr// and reuse it in your pattern along with a look-ahead assertion (?=...) to stretch the match just far enough to capture the entire value while also preventing it from spilling into the next variable name.

Matching against your pattern in list context with m//g gives the following behavior:

The /g modifier specifies global pattern matching—that is, matching as many times as possible within the string. How it behaves depends on the context. In list context, it returns a list of the substrings matched by any capturing parentheses in the regular expression. If there are no parentheses, it returns a list of all the matched strings, as if there were parentheses around the whole pattern.

The pattern $assignment uses non-greedy .+? to cut off the value as soon as the look-ahead sees another assignment or end-of-line. Remember that the match returns the substrings from all capturing subpatterns, so the look-ahead's alternation uses non-capturing (?:...). The qr//, in contrast, contains implicit capturing parentheses.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $string = <<'EOF';
var1=100 var2=90 var5=hello var3="a, b, c" var7=test var3=hello
EOF

my $assignment = qr/\b\w+ = .+?/x;
my @array = $string =~ /$assignment (?= \s+ (?: $ | $assignment))/gx;

for ( my $i = 0; $i < scalar( @array ); $i++ )
{
  print $i.": ".$array[$i]."\n";
}

Output:

0: var1=100
1: var2=90
2: var5=hello
3: var3="a, b, c"
4: var7=test
5: var3=hello
1
source|link

With regular expressions, use a technique that I like to call tack-and-stretch: anchor on features you know will be there (tack) and then grab what's between (stretch).

In this case, you know that a single assignment matches

\b\w+=.+

and you have many of these repeated in $string. Remember that \b means word boundary:

A word boundary (\b) is a spot between two characters that has a \w on one side of it and a \W on the other side of it (in either order), counting the imaginary characters off the beginning and end of the string as matching a \W.

The values in the assignments can be a little tricky to describe with a regular expression, but you also know that each value will terminate with some optional whitespace followed by either another assignment or end-of-string.

To avoid repeating the assertion pattern, compile it once with qr// and reuse it in your pattern along with a look-ahead assertion (?=...) to keep the match from spilling into the next variable name.

Matching against your pattern in list context with m//g gives the following behavior:

The /g modifier specifies global pattern matching—that is, matching as many times as possible within the string. How it behaves depends on the context. In list context, it returns a list of the substrings matched by any capturing parentheses in the regular expression. If there are no parentheses, it returns a list of all the matched strings, as if there were parentheses around the whole pattern.

The pattern $assignment uses non-greedy .+? to cut off the value as soon as the look-ahead sees another assignment or end-of-line. Remember that the match returns the substrings from all capturing subpatterns, so the look-ahead's alternation uses non-capturing (?:...). The qr//, in contrast, contains implicit capturing parentheses.

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $string = <<'EOF';
var1=100 var2=90 var5=hello var3="a, b, c" var7=test var3=hello
EOF

my $assignment = qr/\b\w+ = .+?/x;
my @array = $string =~ /$assignment (?= \s* (?: $ | $assignment))/gx;

for ( my $i = 0; $i < scalar( @array ); $i++ )
{
  print $i.": ".$array[$i]."\n";
}

Output:

$ ./prog.pl 
0: var1=100
1: var2=90
2: var5=hello
3: var3="a, b, c"
4: var7=test
5: var3=hello