4 added 4 characters in body
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C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

EDIT: there is example code here.

using namespace System;

using namespace System;

public ref class CSquare
{
private:
    double sd;

public:
    CSquare() : sd(0.00) {}
    CSquare(double side) : sd(side) { }
    ~CSquare() { }

    property double Side
    {
    double get() { return sd; }
    void set(double s)
    {
        if( s <= 0 )
        sd = 0.00;
        else
        sd = s;
    }
    }

    property double Perimeter { double get() { return sd * 4; } }
    property double Area { double get() { return sd * sd; } }
};

array<CSquare ^> ^ CreateSquares()
{
    array<CSquare ^> ^ sqrs = gcnew array<CSquare ^>(5);

    sqrs[0] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[0]->Side = 5.62;
    sqrs[1] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[1]->Side = 770.448;
    sqrs[2] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[2]->Side = 2442.08;
    sqrs[3] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[3]->Side = 82.304;
    sqrs[4] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[4]->Side = 640.1115;

    return sqrs;
}

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

EDIT: there is example code here.

using namespace System;

public ref class CSquare
{
private:
    double sd;

public:
    CSquare() : sd(0.00) {}
    CSquare(double side) : sd(side) { }
    ~CSquare() { }

    property double Side
    {
    double get() { return sd; }
    void set(double s)
    {
        if( s <= 0 )
        sd = 0.00;
        else
        sd = s;
    }
    }

    property double Perimeter { double get() { return sd * 4; } }
    property double Area { double get() { return sd * sd; } }
};

array<CSquare ^> ^ CreateSquares()
{
    array<CSquare ^> ^ sqrs = gcnew array<CSquare ^>(5);

    sqrs[0] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[0]->Side = 5.62;
    sqrs[1] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[1]->Side = 770.448;
    sqrs[2] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[2]->Side = 2442.08;
    sqrs[3] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[3]->Side = 82.304;
    sqrs[4] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[4]->Side = 640.1115;

    return sqrs;
}

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

EDIT: there is example code here.

using namespace System;

public ref class CSquare
{
private:
    double sd;

public:
    CSquare() : sd(0.00) {}
    CSquare(double side) : sd(side) { }
    ~CSquare() { }

    property double Side
    {
    double get() { return sd; }
    void set(double s)
    {
        if( s <= 0 )
        sd = 0.00;
        else
        sd = s;
    }
    }

    property double Perimeter { double get() { return sd * 4; } }
    property double Area { double get() { return sd * sd; } }
};

array<CSquare ^> ^ CreateSquares()
{
    array<CSquare ^> ^ sqrs = gcnew array<CSquare ^>(5);

    sqrs[0] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[0]->Side = 5.62;
    sqrs[1] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[1]->Side = 770.448;
    sqrs[2] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[2]->Side = 2442.08;
    sqrs[3] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[3]->Side = 82.304;
    sqrs[4] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[4]->Side = 640.1115;

    return sqrs;
}
3 added 1174 characters in body
source|link

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

EDIT: there is example code here.

using namespace System;

public ref class CSquare
{
private:
    double sd;

public:
    CSquare() : sd(0.00) {}
    CSquare(double side) : sd(side) { }
    ~CSquare() { }

    property double Side
    {
    double get() { return sd; }
    void set(double s)
    {
        if( s <= 0 )
        sd = 0.00;
        else
        sd = s;
    }
    }

    property double Perimeter { double get() { return sd * 4; } }
    property double Area { double get() { return sd * sd; } }
};

array<CSquare ^> ^ CreateSquares()
{
    array<CSquare ^> ^ sqrs = gcnew array<CSquare ^>(5);

    sqrs[0] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[0]->Side = 5.62;
    sqrs[1] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[1]->Side = 770.448;
    sqrs[2] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[2]->Side = 2442.08;
    sqrs[3] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[3]->Side = 82.304;
    sqrs[4] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[4]->Side = 640.1115;

    return sqrs;
}

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

EDIT: there is example code here.

using namespace System;

public ref class CSquare
{
private:
    double sd;

public:
    CSquare() : sd(0.00) {}
    CSquare(double side) : sd(side) { }
    ~CSquare() { }

    property double Side
    {
    double get() { return sd; }
    void set(double s)
    {
        if( s <= 0 )
        sd = 0.00;
        else
        sd = s;
    }
    }

    property double Perimeter { double get() { return sd * 4; } }
    property double Area { double get() { return sd * sd; } }
};

array<CSquare ^> ^ CreateSquares()
{
    array<CSquare ^> ^ sqrs = gcnew array<CSquare ^>(5);

    sqrs[0] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[0]->Side = 5.62;
    sqrs[1] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[1]->Side = 770.448;
    sqrs[2] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[2]->Side = 2442.08;
    sqrs[3] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[3]->Side = 82.304;
    sqrs[4] = gcnew CSquare;
    sqrs[4]->Side = 640.1115;

    return sqrs;
}
2 added 148 characters in body
source|link

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

C++/CLI or COM interop work just as well with non-static classes as with static. Using C++/CLI you just reference your assembly that holds the non-static class and then you can use gcnew to obtain a reference to a new instance.

What makes you think that this is not possible with your non-static class?

1
source|link