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With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS  (which ignores NULL values):

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

You can also set the MySQL server SQL mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation.

SET @@sql_mode=CONCAT_WS(',', @@sql_mode, 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT');
SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE (user_firstname || ' ' || user_lastname) LIKE ?

This sets the SQL mode for the current session only. You'll need to set @@sql_mode each time you connect. If you wish to unset 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT' mode in a session:

SET @@sql_mode=REPLACE(@@sql_mode, 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT', '');

MySQL appears to remove any extra commas in @@sql_mode, so you don't need to worry about them.

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS :

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

You can also set the MySQL server mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation.

SET @@sql_mode=CONCAT_WS(',', @@sql_mode, 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT');
SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE (user_firstname || ' ' || user_lastname) LIKE ?

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS (which ignores NULL values):

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

You can also set the MySQL server SQL mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation.

SET @@sql_mode=CONCAT_WS(',', @@sql_mode, 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT');
SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE (user_firstname || ' ' || user_lastname) LIKE ?

This sets the SQL mode for the current session only. You'll need to set @@sql_mode each time you connect. If you wish to unset 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT' mode in a session:

SET @@sql_mode=REPLACE(@@sql_mode, 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT', '');

MySQL appears to remove any extra commas in @@sql_mode, so you don't need to worry about them.

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

5 added 166 characters in body
source|link

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

You can also set the MySQL server mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation.

SET @@sql_mode=CONCAT_WS(',', @@sql_mode, 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT');
SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE (user_firstname || ' ' || user_lastname) LIKE ?

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

You can also set the MySQL server mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation.

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

You can also set the MySQL server mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation.

SET @@sql_mode=CONCAT_WS(',', @@sql_mode, 'PIPES_AS_CONCAT');
SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE (user_firstname || ' ' || user_lastname) LIKE ?

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

4 added 73 characters in body; added 380 characters in body
source|link

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

+ should work You can also set the MySQL server mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation in T-SQL, which I take to mean you're not using any version of SQL Server.

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query.

+ should work for string concatenation in T-SQL, which I take to mean you're not using any version of SQL Server.

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

With MySQL, you can use CONCAT:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT(user_firstname, ' ', user_lastname) LIKE ?

or CONCAT_WS:

SELECT * FROM sam_users 
  WHERE CONCAT_WS(' ', user_firstname, user_lastname) LIKE ?

However, MySQL won't be able to use any indices when performing this query. If the value of the pattern argument to LIKE begins with a wildcard, MySQL won't be able to use indices, so comparing to a generated value (instead of a column) won't make a difference.

You can also set the MySQL server mode to "ANSI" or "PIPES_AS_CONCAT" to use the || operator for string concatenation.

Don't use SELECT *; select only the columns you need.

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2 removed double comma
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