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This would seem to be the sort of thing for which a hashtable would be perfect. Storage and retrieval of hashtable entries is possible in O(1) time, and can be used quite effectively here. I would recommend trying something like the following algorithm:

  1. Create a Dictionary<string, int> (this is effectively a generic hashtable, available from .NET 2.0 onwards). This will be used to keep track of the occurrences of each keywords (the value will act as a bit field).
  2. Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example: dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex); where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.

    Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example:

    dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex);
    

    where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.

  3. Iterate over all entries in the dictionary, looking for the appropiate value (bit field). In your case, because you are looking for a keyword that appears in the first two files but not the last two, the value you want to search for is 0011 (or 3 in decimal). Find this entry and you have your keyword.

Unless I'm mistaken, this algorithm runs in O(n) time, where n is the total number of keywords in all your text files. I don't think you're going to get better than that, truthfully.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need a few more details...

Edit: Hrmm... I seemed to have missed the bit about your "keywords" possibly containing more than one actual word. If these "keywords" are known to be shorted than a certain (lowish) number of words, then I think this solution may still be viable with small modifications. Otherwise, you'll need something a bit more clever, it would appear.

This would seem to be the sort of thing for which a hashtable would be perfect. Storage and retrieval of hashtable entries is possible in O(1) time, and can be used quite effectively here. I would recommend trying something like the following algorithm:

  1. Create a Dictionary<string, int> (this is effectively a generic hashtable, available from .NET 2.0 onwards). This will be used to keep track of the occurrences of each keywords (the value will act as a bit field).
  2. Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example: dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex); where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.
  3. Iterate over all entries in the dictionary, looking for the appropiate value (bit field). In your case, because you are looking for a keyword that appears in the first two files but not the last two, the value you want to search for is 0011 (or 3 in decimal). Find this entry and you have your keyword.

Unless I'm mistaken, this algorithm runs in O(n) time, where n is the total number of keywords in all your text files. I don't think you're going to get better than that, truthfully.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need a few more details...

Edit: Hrmm... I seemed to have missed the bit about your "keywords" possibly containing more than one actual word. If these "keywords" are known to be shorted than a certain (lowish) number of words, then I think this solution may still be viable with small modifications. Otherwise, you'll need something a bit more clever, it would appear.

This would seem to be the sort of thing for which a hashtable would be perfect. Storage and retrieval of hashtable entries is possible in O(1) time, and can be used quite effectively here. I would recommend trying something like the following algorithm:

  1. Create a Dictionary<string, int> (this is effectively a generic hashtable, available from .NET 2.0 onwards). This will be used to keep track of the occurrences of each keywords (the value will act as a bit field).
  2. Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example:

    dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex);
    

    where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.

  3. Iterate over all entries in the dictionary, looking for the appropiate value (bit field). In your case, because you are looking for a keyword that appears in the first two files but not the last two, the value you want to search for is 0011 (or 3 in decimal). Find this entry and you have your keyword.

Unless I'm mistaken, this algorithm runs in O(n) time, where n is the total number of keywords in all your text files. I don't think you're going to get better than that, truthfully.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need a few more details...

Edit: Hrmm... I seemed to have missed the bit about your "keywords" possibly containing more than one actual word. If these "keywords" are known to be shorted than a certain (lowish) number of words, then I think this solution may still be viable with small modifications. Otherwise, you'll need something a bit more clever, it would appear.

2 added 360 characters in body
source|link

This would seem to be the sort of thing for which a hashtable would be perfect. Storage and retrieval of hashtable entries is possible in O(1) time, and can be used quite effectively here. I would recommend trying something like the following algorithm:

  1. Create a Dictionary<string, int> (this is effectively a generic hashtable, available from .NET 2.0 onwards). This will be used to keep track of the occurrences of each keywords (the value will act as a bit field).
  2. Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example: dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex); where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.
  3. Iterate over all entries in the dictionary, looking for the appropiate value (bit field). In your case, because you are looking for a keyword that appears in the first two files but not the last two, the value you want to search for is 0011 (or 3 in decimal). Find this entry and you have your keyword.

Unless I'm mistaken, this algorithm runs in O(n) time, where n is the total number of keywords in all your text files. I don't think you're going to get better than that, truthfully.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need a few more details...

Edit: Hrmm... I seemed to have missed the bit about your "keywords" possibly containing more than one actual word. If these "keywords" are known to be shorted than a certain (lowish) number of words, then I think this solution may still be viable with small modifications. Otherwise, you'll need something a bit more clever, it would appear.

This would seem to be the sort of thing for which a hashtable would be perfect. Storage and retrieval of hashtable entries is possible in O(1) time, and can be used quite effectively here. I would recommend trying something like the following algorithm:

  1. Create a Dictionary<string, int> (this is effectively a generic hashtable, available from .NET 2.0 onwards). This will be used to keep track of the occurrences of each keywords (the value will act as a bit field).
  2. Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example: dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex); where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.
  3. Iterate over all entries in the dictionary, looking for the appropiate value (bit field). In your case, because you are looking for a keyword that appears in the first two files but not the last two, the value you want to search for is 0011 (or 3 in decimal). Find this entry and you have your keyword.

Unless I'm mistaken, this algorithm runs in O(n) time, where n is the total number of keywords in all your text files. I don't think you're going to get better than that, truthfully.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need a few more details...

This would seem to be the sort of thing for which a hashtable would be perfect. Storage and retrieval of hashtable entries is possible in O(1) time, and can be used quite effectively here. I would recommend trying something like the following algorithm:

  1. Create a Dictionary<string, int> (this is effectively a generic hashtable, available from .NET 2.0 onwards). This will be used to keep track of the occurrences of each keywords (the value will act as a bit field).
  2. Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example: dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex); where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.
  3. Iterate over all entries in the dictionary, looking for the appropiate value (bit field). In your case, because you are looking for a keyword that appears in the first two files but not the last two, the value you want to search for is 0011 (or 3 in decimal). Find this entry and you have your keyword.

Unless I'm mistaken, this algorithm runs in O(n) time, where n is the total number of keywords in all your text files. I don't think you're going to get better than that, truthfully.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need a few more details...

Edit: Hrmm... I seemed to have missed the bit about your "keywords" possibly containing more than one actual word. If these "keywords" are known to be shorted than a certain (lowish) number of words, then I think this solution may still be viable with small modifications. Otherwise, you'll need something a bit more clever, it would appear.

1
source|link

This would seem to be the sort of thing for which a hashtable would be perfect. Storage and retrieval of hashtable entries is possible in O(1) time, and can be used quite effectively here. I would recommend trying something like the following algorithm:

  1. Create a Dictionary<string, int> (this is effectively a generic hashtable, available from .NET 2.0 onwards). This will be used to keep track of the occurrences of each keywords (the value will act as a bit field).
  2. Load each text file and read all the keywords, setting the appropiate bit for the corresponding text file in which the keyword is found. Example: dict[keyword] |= (1 << curTextFileIndex); where curTextFileIndex would vary from 0 to 3 in your case.
  3. Iterate over all entries in the dictionary, looking for the appropiate value (bit field). In your case, because you are looking for a keyword that appears in the first two files but not the last two, the value you want to search for is 0011 (or 3 in decimal). Find this entry and you have your keyword.

Unless I'm mistaken, this algorithm runs in O(n) time, where n is the total number of keywords in all your text files. I don't think you're going to get better than that, truthfully.

Hope that helps. Let me know if you need a few more details...