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templatetypedef, OP's use of "BFS" suggests that the graph is unweighted.

Here's an algorithm that runs in time proportional to the length sum, for each root in the final collection, of the size of the subgraph reachable from that root. For, say, graphs of bounded degree, this is on the order of the size of the output. 

For the sake of uniqueness I'm going to assume that "shortest path" means least in length-lex order. At a high-level, we compute an order in which to process the vertices so that if vertex u's BFS tree subsumes vertex v's, then u is ordered before v. Each vertex is processed in linear time, which includes determining the vertices it subsumes.

The order is computed by finding the strong components, topologically sorting the strong components, and then ordering the vertices within each single component arbitrarily. Clearly u subsumes v only if the set of vertices reachable from u is a proper superset of the vertices reachable from v.

To process a vertex u, compute the BFS tree from u and then determine the set of vertices whose subtrees have no arc leaving the subtree - these are the ones that get subsumed. Determine the latter by traversing the tree depth-first, recording, for each vertex v, an interval I(v) whose left endpoint is the entry time and whose right endpoint is the exit time. For each vertex v, compute the smallest interval J(v) containing I(v) and all I(w) with an arc v->w. Using DFS, compute, for each vertex v, the smallest interval K(v) containing K(w) for all descendants w of v. A vertex v other than u is subsumed if and only if K(v) = I(v).

Why should this work? We know that v's subtree of the tree rooted at u is a subset of the tree rooted at v. Suppose that u subsumes v (in other words, these two trees are equal). Then clearly the head of every arc from v's subtree goes to v's subtree, as otherwise, the head should have been explored. Conversely, suppose that u does not subsume v. The tree rooted at v contains a vertex not in v's subtree, and thus there's an arc leaving v's subtree.

I hope this description is useful to you, but I fear that your actual question involves fast point-to-point shortest path queries with subquadratic space, for which there might be better approaches.

templatetypedef, OP's use of "BFS" suggests that the graph is unweighted.

Here's an algorithm that runs in time proportional to the length of the output. For the sake of uniqueness I'm going to assume that "shortest path" means least in length-lex order. At a high-level, we compute an order in which to process the vertices so that if vertex u's BFS tree subsumes vertex v's, then u is ordered before v. Each vertex is processed in linear time, which includes determining the vertices it subsumes.

The order is computed by finding the strong components, topologically sorting the strong components, and then ordering the vertices within each single component arbitrarily. Clearly u subsumes v only if the set of vertices reachable from u is a proper superset of the vertices reachable from v.

To process a vertex u, compute the BFS tree from u and then determine the set of vertices whose subtrees have no arc leaving the subtree - these are the ones that get subsumed. Determine the latter by traversing the tree depth-first, recording, for each vertex v, an interval I(v) whose left endpoint is the entry time and whose right endpoint is the exit time. For each vertex v, compute the smallest interval J(v) containing I(v) and all I(w) with an arc v->w. Using DFS, compute, for each vertex v, the smallest interval K(v) containing K(w) for all descendants w of v. A vertex v other than u is subsumed if and only if K(v) = I(v).

Why should this work? We know that v's subtree of the tree rooted at u is a subset of the tree rooted at v. Suppose that u subsumes v (in other words, these two trees are equal). Then clearly the head of every arc from v's subtree goes to v's subtree, as otherwise, the head should have been explored. Conversely, suppose that u does not subsume v. The tree rooted at v contains a vertex not in v's subtree, and thus there's an arc leaving v's subtree.

I hope this description is useful to you, but I fear that your actual question involves fast point-to-point shortest path queries with subquadratic space, for which there might be better approaches.

templatetypedef, OP's use of "BFS" suggests that the graph is unweighted.

Here's an algorithm that runs in time proportional to the sum, for each root in the final collection, of the size of the subgraph reachable from that root. For, say, graphs of bounded degree, this is on the order of the size of the output. 

For the sake of uniqueness I'm going to assume that "shortest path" means least in length-lex order. At a high-level, we compute an order in which to process the vertices so that if vertex u's BFS tree subsumes vertex v's, then u is ordered before v. Each vertex is processed in linear time, which includes determining the vertices it subsumes.

The order is computed by finding the strong components, topologically sorting the strong components, and then ordering the vertices within each single component arbitrarily. Clearly u subsumes v only if the set of vertices reachable from u is a proper superset of the vertices reachable from v.

To process a vertex u, compute the BFS tree from u and then determine the set of vertices whose subtrees have no arc leaving the subtree - these are the ones that get subsumed. Determine the latter by traversing the tree depth-first, recording, for each vertex v, an interval I(v) whose left endpoint is the entry time and whose right endpoint is the exit time. For each vertex v, compute the smallest interval J(v) containing I(v) and all I(w) with an arc v->w. Using DFS, compute, for each vertex v, the smallest interval K(v) containing K(w) for all descendants w of v. A vertex v other than u is subsumed if and only if K(v) = I(v).

Why should this work? We know that v's subtree of the tree rooted at u is a subset of the tree rooted at v. Suppose that u subsumes v (in other words, these two trees are equal). Then clearly the head of every arc from v's subtree goes to v's subtree, as otherwise, the head should have been explored. Conversely, suppose that u does not subsume v. The tree rooted at v contains a vertex not in v's subtree, and thus there's an arc leaving v's subtree.

I hope this description is useful to you, but I fear that your actual question involves fast point-to-point shortest path queries with subquadratic space, for which there might be better approaches.

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templatetypedef, OP's use of "BFS" suggests that the graph is unweighted.

Here's an algorithm that runs in time proportional to the length of the output. For the sake of uniqueness I'm going to assume that "shortest path" means least in length-lex order. At a high-level, we compute an order in which to process the vertices so that if vertex u's BFS tree subsumes vertex v's, then u is ordered before v. Each vertex is processed in linear time, which includes determining the vertices it subsumes.

The order is computed by finding the strong components, topologically sorting the strong components, and then ordering the vertices within each single component arbitrarily. Clearly u subsumes v only if the set of vertices reachable from u is a proper superset of the vertices reachable from v.

To process a vertex u, compute the BFS tree from u and then determine the set of vertices whose subtrees have no arc leaving the subtree - these are the ones that get subsumed. Determine the latter by traversing the tree depth-first, recording, for each vertex v, an interval I(v) whose left endpoint is the entry time and whose right endpoint is the exit time. For each vertex v, compute the smallest interval J(v) containing I(v) and all I(w) with an arc v->w. Using DFS, compute, for each vertex v, the smallest interval K(v) containing K(w) for all descendants w of v. A vertex v other than u is subsumed if and only if K(v) = I(v).

Why should this work? We know that v's subtree of the tree rooted at u is a subset of the tree rooted at v. Suppose that u subsumes v (in other words, these two trees are equal). Then clearly the head of every arc from v's subtree goes to v's subtree, as otherwise, the head should have been explored. Conversely, suppose that u does not subsume v. The tree rooted at v contains a vertex not in v's subtree, and thus there's an arc leaving v's subtree.

I hope this description is useful to you, but I fear that your actual question involves fast point-to-point shortest path queries with subquadratic space, for which there might be better approaches.