3 insert duplicate link
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    Post Closed as "exact duplicate" by aschepler, GManNickG, delnan, Omnifarious, George Stocker of
2 added 1566 characters in body
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Edit: Here is what I finally went with because I don't really trust the ::std::common_type template. It still has a problem though, it will bind + from right to left instead of from left to right. This may cause problems with non-commutative + operators. That's not very hard to fix though:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

namespace {
template<class T> typename ::std::add_rvalue_reference<T>::type val();

template<class T> struct id{typedef T type;};

template<class T, class... P> struct sum_type;
template<class T> struct sum_type<T> : id< T > {};
template<class T, class U, class... P> struct sum_type<T,U,P...>
: sum_type< decltype( val<const T&>() + val<const U&>() ), P... > {};
}

template <typename T>
T sum(const T &&arg)
{
   return ::std::forward<const T>(arg);
}

template <typename FirstArg, typename SecondArg, typename... RemainingArgs>
auto sum(const FirstArg &&first, const SecondArg &&second,
         const RemainingArgs &&... args)
   -> typename sum_type<FirstArg, SecondArg, RemainingArgs...>::type
{
   using ::std::forward;

   return forward<const FirstArg>(first) + \
      sum(forward<const SecondArg>(second),
          forward<const RemainingArgs>(args)...);
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
   using ::std::cout;
   cout << sum(1, 2, 3.2) << '\n';

   return 0;
}

Edit: Here is what I finally went with because I don't really trust the ::std::common_type template. It still has a problem though, it will bind + from right to left instead of from left to right. This may cause problems with non-commutative + operators. That's not very hard to fix though:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <utility>

namespace {
template<class T> typename ::std::add_rvalue_reference<T>::type val();

template<class T> struct id{typedef T type;};

template<class T, class... P> struct sum_type;
template<class T> struct sum_type<T> : id< T > {};
template<class T, class U, class... P> struct sum_type<T,U,P...>
: sum_type< decltype( val<const T&>() + val<const U&>() ), P... > {};
}

template <typename T>
T sum(const T &&arg)
{
   return ::std::forward<const T>(arg);
}

template <typename FirstArg, typename SecondArg, typename... RemainingArgs>
auto sum(const FirstArg &&first, const SecondArg &&second,
         const RemainingArgs &&... args)
   -> typename sum_type<FirstArg, SecondArg, RemainingArgs...>::type
{
   using ::std::forward;

   return forward<const FirstArg>(first) + \
      sum(forward<const SecondArg>(second),
          forward<const RemainingArgs>(args)...);
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
   using ::std::cout;
   cout << sum(1, 2, 3.2) << '\n';

   return 0;
}
1
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What's wrong (if anything) with this implementation of a C++11 variadic sum function?

I'm getting this compiler error:

g++ -std=gnu++0x -I. -O3 -Wall sum.cpp
sum.cpp:7:41: sorry, unimplemented: cannot expand ‘Remaining ...’ into a fixed-length argument list
sum.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, const char**)’:
sum.cpp:29:23: error: no matching function for call to ‘sum(int, int, int)’
sum.cpp:29:23: note: candidate is:
sum.cpp:20:6: note: template<class FirstArg, class ... RemainingArgs> decltype (Sum<FirstArg, RemainingArgs ...>::sum(first, sum::args ...)) sum(const FirstArg&, const RemainingArgs& ...)

for this sum.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template <typename First, typename... Remaining>
struct Sum {
   static auto sum(const First &arg, const Remaining &... args)
      -> decltype(arg + Sum<Remaining...>::sum(args...))
   {
      return arg + sum(args...);
   }
};

template <typename First>
struct Sum<First>
{
   static First sum(const First &arg) { return arg; }
};

template <typename FirstArg, typename... RemainingArgs>
auto sum(const FirstArg &first, const RemainingArgs &... args)
   -> decltype(Sum<FirstArg, RemainingArgs...>::sum(first, args...))
{
   return Sum<FirstArg, RemainingArgs...>::sum(first, args...);
}

int main(int argc, const char *argv[])
{
   using ::std::cout;
   cout << sum(1, 2, 3) << '\n';

   return 0;
}

I've tried multiple means of declaring this function. Is this just a problem with gcc 4.6.1?