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How can I retrieve the item that is selected in a WPF-treeview? I want to do this in XAML, because I want to bind it.

You might think that it is SelectedItem but apparently that does not exist is readonly and therefore unusable.

This is what I want to do:

<TreeView ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Model.Clusters}" 
    		ItemTemplate="{StaticResource ClusterTemplate}"
    		SelectedItem="{Binding Path=Model.SelectedCluster}" />

I want to bind the SelectedItem to a property on my Model.

But this gives me the error:

'SelectedItem' property is read-only and cannot be set from markup.

Edit: Ok, this is the way that I solved this:

<TreeView
    	  ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Model.Clusters}" 
    	  ItemTemplate="{StaticResource HoofdCLusterTemplate}"
    	  SelectedItemChanged="TreeView_OnSelectedItemChanged" />

and in the codebehindfile of my xaml:

private void TreeView_OnSelectedItemChanged(object sender, RoutedPropertyChangedEventArgs<object> e)
{
    Model.SelectedCluster = (Cluster)e.NewValue;
}
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3  
Yea, this is really inconvenient. –  Benny Jobigan Feb 10 '10 at 3:18
13  
Man this sucks. It just hit me too. I came here hoping to find that there is a decent way and I'm just an idiot. This is the first time that I am sad that I am not an idiot.. –  Andrei Rînea May 14 '10 at 10:54
2  
this really sucks and mess up the binding concept –  Delta Aug 20 '10 at 18:26
    
Hope this could help some one to bind to a tree view item selected changed call back on Icommand jacobaloysious.wordpress.com/2012/02/19/… –  jacob aloysious Feb 19 '12 at 5:16
    
In terms of binding and MVVM, code behind is not "banned", rather code behind should support the view. In my opinion from all the other solutions I've seen, the code behind is a vastly better option since it's still dealing with "binding" the view to the viewmodel. The only negative is that if you have a team with a designer on it working only in XAML, the code behind could get broken/neglected. It's a small price to pay for a solution that takes 10 seconds to implement. –  nrjohnstone Feb 19 at 20:35

13 Answers 13

up vote 18 down vote accepted

This property exists : TreeView.SelectedItem

But it is readonly, so you cannot assign it through a binding, only retrieve it

share|improve this answer
    
I accept this answer, because there I found this link, which let to my own answer: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms788714.aspx –  Natrium Jun 16 '09 at 11:56
1  
but you can make it not readonly, see my answer –  Delta Aug 21 '10 at 17:35

I realise this has already had an answer accepted, but I put this together to solve the problem. It uses a similar idea to Delta's solution, but without the need to subclass the TreeView:

public class BindableSelectedItemBehavior : Behavior<TreeView>
{
    #region SelectedItem Property

    public object SelectedItem
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(SelectedItemProperty); }
        set { SetValue(SelectedItemProperty, value); }
    }

    public static readonly DependencyProperty SelectedItemProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("SelectedItem", typeof(object), typeof(BindableSelectedItemBehavior), new UIPropertyMetadata(null, OnSelectedItemChanged));

    private static void OnSelectedItemChanged(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var item = e.NewValue as TreeViewItem;
        if (item != null)
        {
            item.SetValue(TreeViewItem.IsSelectedProperty, true);
        }
    }

    #endregion

    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        base.OnAttached();

        this.AssociatedObject.SelectedItemChanged += OnTreeViewSelectedItemChanged;
    }

    protected override void OnDetaching()
    {
        base.OnDetaching();

        if (this.AssociatedObject != null)
        {
            this.AssociatedObject.SelectedItemChanged -= OnTreeViewSelectedItemChanged;
        }
    }

    private void OnTreeViewSelectedItemChanged(object sender, RoutedPropertyChangedEventArgs<object> e)
    {
        this.SelectedItem = e.NewValue;
    }
}

You can then use this in your XAML as:

<TreeView>
    <e:Interaction.Behaviors>
        <behaviours:BindableSelectedItemBehavior SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedItem, Mode=TwoWay}" />
    </e:Interaction.Behaviors>
</TreeView>

Hopefully it will help someone!

share|improve this answer
7  
+1 for the solution. If anyone else is reading this, I had to add Mode=TwoWay to the binding in order for it to work. Maybe it's just me... –  Brent May 12 '11 at 3:12
4  
As Brent pointed out I also needed to add Mode=TwoWay to the binding. I'm not a "Blender" so wasn't familiar withe the Behavior<> class from System.Windows.Interactivity. The assembly is part of Expression Blend. For those who don't want to buy/install trial to get this assembly you can download the BlendSDK which includes System.Windows.Interactivity. BlendSDK 3 for 3.5... I think it is BlendSDK 4 for 4.0. Note: This only allows you to get what item is selected, does not allow you to set the selected item –  Discofunk Jun 17 '11 at 20:53
3  
You can also replace UIPropertyMetadata by FrameworkPropertyMetadata(null, FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.BindsTwoWayByDefault, OnSelectedItemChanged)); –  Filimindji Dec 4 '11 at 2:50
9  
nope. this gives you the selected TreeViewItem and not the data item (datacontext) that is associated with it. There's a reason that the original SelectedItem in TreeView is readonly - it's hard to find the SelectedTreeViewItem from the data item. no good solution afaik :( –  Elad Katz Nov 7 '12 at 9:10
2  
@Lukas exactly as shown in the XAML code snippet above. Just replace {Binding SelectedItem, Mode=TwoWay} with {Binding MyViewModelField, Mode=TwoWay} –  Steve Greatrex Dec 11 '13 at 17:22

well, I find a solution, it move the mess, so mvvm works

first add this class

public class ExtendedTreeView : TreeView
{
    public ExtendedTreeView()
        : base()
    {
        this.SelectedItemChanged += new RoutedPropertyChangedEventHandler<object>(___ICH);
    }

    void ___ICH(object sender, RoutedPropertyChangedEventArgs<object> e)
    {
        if (SelectedItem != null)
        {
            SetValue(SelectedItem_Property, SelectedItem);
        }
    }

    public object SelectedItem_
    {
        get { return (object)GetValue(SelectedItem_Property); }
        set { SetValue(SelectedItem_Property, value); }
    }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty SelectedItem_Property = DependencyProperty.Register("SelectedItem_", typeof(object), typeof(ExtendedTreeView), new UIPropertyMetadata(null));
}

and add this to yor xmla

 <local:ExtendedTreeView ItemsSource="{Binding Items}" SelectedItem_="{Binding Item, Mode=TwoWay}">
 .....
 </local:ExtendedTreeView>
share|improve this answer
6  
For this I would have done an Attached Behavior! –  Elisa Nov 25 '10 at 11:56
2  
This is the ONLY thing that has come close to working for me so far. I really like this solution. –  Rachael Mar 8 '13 at 19:32
    
Don't know why but it did not work for me :( I succeeded to get the selected item from the tree but not the vice versa - to change the selected item from outside the tree. –  Erez Sep 24 '13 at 7:33

Answer with attached properties and no external dependencies, should the need ever arise!

You can create an attached property that is bindable and has a getter and setter:

public class TreeViewHelper
{
    private static Dictionary<DependencyObject, TreeViewSelectedItemBehavior> behaviors = new Dictionary<DependencyObject, TreeViewSelectedItemBehavior>();

    public static object GetSelectedItem(DependencyObject obj)
    {
        return (object)obj.GetValue(SelectedItemProperty);
    }

    public static void SetSelectedItem(DependencyObject obj, object value)
    {
        obj.SetValue(SelectedItemProperty, value);
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for SelectedItem.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public static readonly DependencyProperty SelectedItemProperty =
        DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("SelectedItem", typeof(object), typeof(TreeViewHelper), new UIPropertyMetadata(null, SelectedItemChanged));

    private static void SelectedItemChanged(DependencyObject obj, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (!(obj is TreeView))
            return;

        if (!behaviors.ContainsKey(obj))
            behaviors.Add(obj, new TreeViewSelectedItemBehavior(obj as TreeView));

        TreeViewSelectedItemBehavior view = behaviors[obj];
        view.ChangeSelectedItem(e.NewValue);
    }

    private class TreeViewSelectedItemBehavior
    {
        TreeView view;
        public TreeViewSelectedItemBehavior(TreeView view)
        {
            this.view = view;
            view.SelectedItemChanged += (sender, e) => SetSelectedItem(view, e.NewValue);
        }

        internal void ChangeSelectedItem(object p)
        {
            TreeViewItem item = (TreeViewItem)view.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromItem(p);
            item.IsSelected = true;
        }
    }
}

Add the namespace declaration containing that class to your XAML and bind as follows (local is how I named the namespace declaration):

        <TreeView ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Root.Children}" local:TreeViewHelper.SelectedItem="{Binding Path=SelectedItem, Mode=TwoWay}">

    </TreeView>

Now you can bind the selected item, and also set it in your view model to change it programmatically, should that requirement ever arise. This is, of course, assuming that you implement INotifyPropertyChanged on that particular property.

share|improve this answer
    
Two way binding doesn't seem to work as the cast TreeViewItem to be selected in the TreeViewSelectedItemBehavior class is (in my experience) always null. This may be because ItemContainerGenerator only returns items that have been generated visually, but I'm not really sure. +1 for the rest anyway. –  Sheridan Oct 18 '11 at 23:16
    
+1, best answer in this thread imho. No dependency on System.Windows.Interactivity, and allows two-way binding (setting programmatically in an MVVM environment). Perfect. –  Chris Ray Jun 26 '13 at 22:02
    
+1, though too late, minor change is needed. Inherit Helper class with DependencyObject and have property for SelectedItem –  hungryMind Jul 7 at 10:21
    
@hungryMind the DependencyObject relation should not be necessary because this is an attached property –  Bas Brekelmans Jul 7 at 19:15
    
A problem with this approach is the behaviour will only start working once the selected item has been set once via the binding (i.e. from the ViewModel). If the initial value in the VM is null, then the binding won't update the DP value, and the behaviour won't be activated. You could fix this using a different default selected item (e.g. an invalid item). –  Mark Jul 17 at 10:32

All to complicated... Go with Caliburn Micro (http://caliburnmicro.codeplex.com/)

View:

<TreeView Micro:Message.Attach="[Event SelectedItemChanged] = [Action SetSelectedItem($this.SelectedItem)]" />

ViewModel:

public void SetSelectedItem(YourNodeViewModel item) {}; 
share|improve this answer
1  
Awesome... was using Caliburn.Micro and wasn't sure how to do this. Worked perfectly! –  Mike L Aug 10 '12 at 0:28
3  
Yes... and where's the part that sets SelectedItem on TreeView? –  mnn May 3 '13 at 13:15

You might also be able to use TreeViewItem.IsSelected property

share|improve this answer
    
If only it were that easy... –  Simon F Jun 11 at 20:28

This can be accomplished in a 'nicer' way using only binding and the GalaSoft MVVM Light library's EventToCommand. In your VM add a command which will be called when the selected item is changed, and initialize the command to perform whatever action is necessary. In this example I used a RelayCommand and will just set the SelectedCluster property.

public class ViewModel
{
    public ViewModel()
    {
        SelectedClusterChanged = new RelayCommand<Cluster>( c => SelectedCluster = c );
    }

    public RelayCommand<Cluster> SelectedClusterChanged { get; private set; } 

    public Cluster SelectedCluster { get; private set; }
}

Then add the EventToCommand behavior in your xaml. This is really easy using blend.

<TreeView
      x:Name="lstClusters"
      ItemsSource="{Binding Path=Model.Clusters}" 
      ItemTemplate="{StaticResource HoofdCLusterTemplate}">
    <i:Interaction.Triggers>
        <i:EventTrigger EventName="SelectedItemChanged">
            <GalaSoft_MvvmLight_Command:EventToCommand Command="{Binding SelectedClusterChanged}" CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=lstClusters,Path=SelectedValue}"/>
        </i:EventTrigger>
    </i:Interaction.Triggers>
</TreeView>
share|improve this answer

I came across this page looking for the same answer as the original author, and proving there's always more than one way to do it, the solution for me was even easier than the answers provided here so far, so I figured I might as well add to the pile.

The motivation for the binding is to keep it nice & MVVM. The probable usage of the ViewModel is to have a property w/ a name such as "CurrentThingy", and somewhere else, the DataContext on some other thing is bound to "CurrentThingy".

Rather than going through additional steps required (eg: custom behavior, 3rd party control) to support a nice binding from the TreeView to my Model, and then from something else to my Model, my solution was to use simple Element binding the other thing to TreeView.SelectedItem, rather than binding the other thing to my ViewModel, thereby skipping the extra work required.

XAML:

<TreeView x:Name="myTreeView" ItemsSource="{Binding MyThingyCollection}">
.... stuff
</TreeView>

<!-- then.. somewhere else where I want to see the currently selected TreeView item: -->

<local:MyThingyDetailsView 
       DataContext="{Binding ElementName=myTreeView, Path=SelectedItem}" />

Of course, this is great for reading the currently selected item, but not setting it, which is all I needed.

share|improve this answer
    
What is local:MyThingyDetailsView? I get that local:MyThingyDetailsView holds the selected item, but how does your view model get this info? This looks like a nice, clean way to do this, but I need just a little more info... –  Bob Horn Feb 4 '12 at 4:03
    
local:MyThingyDetailsView is simply a UserControl full of XAML making up a details view about one "thingy" instance. It's embedded in the middle of another view as content, w/ the DataContext of this view is the currently selected tree view item , using Element binding. –  Wes Feb 14 '12 at 6:21
    
I think I messed up that answer. lemme know if I can clear anything up. –  Wes Feb 14 '12 at 6:32

I suggest an addition to the behavior provided by Steve Greatrex. His behavior doesn't reflects changes from the source because it may not be a collection of TreeViewItems. So it is a matter of finding the TreeViewItem in the tree which datacontext is the selectedValue from the source. The TreeView has a protected property called "ItemsHost", which holds the TreeViewItem collection. We can get it through reflection and walk the tree searching for the selected item.

private static void OnSelectedItemChanged(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        var behavior = sender as BindableSelectedItemBehaviour;

        if (behavior == null) return;

        var tree = behavior.AssociatedObject;

        if (tree == null) return;

        if (e.NewValue == null) 
            foreach (var item in tree.Items.OfType<TreeViewItem>())
                item.SetValue(TreeViewItem.IsSelectedProperty, false);

        var treeViewItem = e.NewValue as TreeViewItem; 
        if (treeViewItem != null)
        {
            treeViewItem.SetValue(TreeViewItem.IsSelectedProperty, true);
        }
        else
        {
            var itemsHostProperty = tree.GetType().GetProperty("ItemsHost", System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic | System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance);

            if (itemsHostProperty == null) return;

            var itemsHost = itemsHostProperty.GetValue(tree, null) as Panel;

            if (itemsHost == null) return;

            foreach (var item in itemsHost.Children.OfType<TreeViewItem>())
                if (WalkTreeViewItem(item, e.NewValue)) break;
        }
    }

    public static bool WalkTreeViewItem(TreeViewItem treeViewItem, object selectedValue) {
        if (treeViewItem.DataContext == selectedValue)
        {
            treeViewItem.SetValue(TreeViewItem.IsSelectedProperty, true);
            treeViewItem.Focus();
            return true;
        }

        foreach (var item in treeViewItem.Items.OfType<TreeViewItem>())
            if (WalkTreeViewItem(item, selectedValue)) return true;

        return false;
    }

This way the behavior works for two-way bindings. Alternatively, it is possible to move the ItemsHost acquisition to the Behavior's OnAttached method, saving the overhead of using reflection every time the binding updates.

share|improve this answer

I tried all solutions of this questions. No one solved my problem fully. So I think it's better to use such inherited class with redefined property SelectedItem. It will work perfectly if you choose tree element from GUI and if you set this property value in your code

public class TreeViewEx : TreeView
{
    public TreeViewEx()
    {
        this.SelectedItemChanged += new RoutedPropertyChangedEventHandler<object>(TreeViewEx_SelectedItemChanged);
    }

    void TreeViewEx_SelectedItemChanged(object sender, RoutedPropertyChangedEventArgs<object> e)
    {
        this.SelectedItem = e.NewValue;
    }

    #region SelectedItem

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or Sets the SelectedItem possible Value of the TreeViewItem object.
    /// </summary>
    public new object SelectedItem
    {
        get { return this.GetValue(TreeViewEx.SelectedItemProperty); }
        set { this.SetValue(TreeViewEx.SelectedItemProperty, value); }
    }

    // Using a DependencyProperty as the backing store for MyProperty.  This enables animation, styling, binding, etc...
    public new static readonly DependencyProperty SelectedItemProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("SelectedItem", typeof(object), typeof(TreeViewEx),
        new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(null, FrameworkPropertyMetadataOptions.BindsTwoWayByDefault, SelectedItemProperty_Changed));

    static void SelectedItemProperty_Changed(DependencyObject dependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        TreeViewEx targetObject = dependencyObject as TreeViewEx;
        if (targetObject != null)
        {
            TreeViewItem tvi = targetObject.FindItemNode(targetObject.SelectedItem) as TreeViewItem;
            if (tvi != null)
                tvi.IsSelected = true;
        }
    }                                               
    #endregion SelectedItem   

    public TreeViewItem FindItemNode(object item)
    {
        TreeViewItem node = null;
        foreach (object data in this.Items)
        {
            node = this.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromItem(data) as TreeViewItem;
            if (node != null)
            {
                if (data == item)
                    break;
                node = FindItemNodeInChildren(node, item);
                if (node != null)
                    break;
            }
        }
        return node;
    }

    protected TreeViewItem FindItemNodeInChildren(TreeViewItem parent, object item)
    {
        TreeViewItem node = null;
        bool isExpanded = parent.IsExpanded;
        if (!isExpanded) //Can't find child container unless the parent node is Expanded once
        {
            parent.IsExpanded = true;
            parent.UpdateLayout();
        }
        foreach (object data in parent.Items)
        {
            node = parent.ItemContainerGenerator.ContainerFromItem(data) as TreeViewItem;
            if (data == item && node != null)
                break;
            node = FindItemNodeInChildren(node, item);
            if (node != null)
                break;
        }
        if (node == null && parent.IsExpanded != isExpanded)
            parent.IsExpanded = isExpanded;
        if (node != null)
            parent.IsExpanded = true;
        return node;
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
It would be much faster if UpdateLayout() and IsExpanded is not called for some nodes. When it is not needed to call UpdateLayout() and IsExpanded? When tree item was visited previously. How to know that? ContainerFromItem() returns null for not visited nodes. So we can expand the parent node only when ContainerFromItem() returns null for children. –  CoperNick Oct 9 '13 at 14:53

After studying the Internet for a day I found my own solution for selecting an item after create a normal treeview in a normal WPF/C# environment

private void BuildSortTree(int sel)
        {
            MergeSort.Items.Clear();
            TreeViewItem itTemp = new TreeViewItem();
            itTemp.Header = SortList[0];
            MergeSort.Items.Add(itTemp);
            TreeViewItem prev;
            itTemp.IsExpanded = true;
            if (0 == sel) itTemp.IsSelected= true;
            prev = itTemp;
            for(int i = 1; i<SortList.Count; i++)
            {

                TreeViewItem itTempNEW = new TreeViewItem();
                itTempNEW.Header = SortList[i];
                prev.Items.Add(itTempNEW);
                itTempNEW.IsExpanded = true;
                if (i == sel) itTempNEW.IsSelected = true;
                prev = itTempNEW ;
            }
        }
share|improve this answer

There is also a way to create XAML bindable SelectedItem property without using Interaction.Behaviors.

public static class BindableSelectedItemHelper
{
    #region Properties

    public static readonly DependencyProperty SelectedItemProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("SelectedItem", typeof(object), typeof(BindableSelectedItemHelper),
        new FrameworkPropertyMetadata(null, OnSelectedItemPropertyChanged));

    public static readonly DependencyProperty AttachProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("Attach", typeof(bool), typeof(BindableSelectedItemHelper), new PropertyMetadata(false, Attach));

    private static readonly DependencyProperty IsUpdatingProperty = DependencyProperty.RegisterAttached("IsUpdating", typeof(bool), typeof(BindableSelectedItemHelper));

    #endregion

    #region Implementation

    public static void SetAttach(DependencyObject dp, bool value)
    {
        dp.SetValue(AttachProperty, value);
    }

    public static bool GetAttach(DependencyObject dp)
    {
        return (bool)dp.GetValue(AttachProperty);
    }

    public static string GetSelectedItem(DependencyObject dp)
    {
        return (string)dp.GetValue(SelectedItemProperty);
    }

    public static void SetSelectedItem(DependencyObject dp, object value)
    {
        dp.SetValue(SelectedItemProperty, value);
    }

    private static bool GetIsUpdating(DependencyObject dp)
    {
        return (bool)dp.GetValue(IsUpdatingProperty);
    }

    private static void SetIsUpdating(DependencyObject dp, bool value)
    {
        dp.SetValue(IsUpdatingProperty, value);
    }

    private static void Attach(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        TreeListView treeListView = sender as TreeListView;
        if (treeListView != null)
        {
            if ((bool)e.OldValue)
                treeListView.SelectedItemChanged -= SelectedItemChanged;

            if ((bool)e.NewValue)
                treeListView.SelectedItemChanged += SelectedItemChanged;
        }
    }

    private static void OnSelectedItemPropertyChanged(DependencyObject sender, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        TreeListView treeListView = sender as TreeListView;
        if (treeListView != null)
        {
            treeListView.SelectedItemChanged -= SelectedItemChanged;

            if (!(bool)GetIsUpdating(treeListView))
            {
                foreach (TreeViewItem item in treeListView.Items)
                {
                    if (item == e.NewValue)
                    {
                        item.IsSelected = true;
                        break;
                    }
                    else
                       item.IsSelected = false;                        
                }
            }

            treeListView.SelectedItemChanged += SelectedItemChanged;
        }
    }

    private static void SelectedItemChanged(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        TreeListView treeListView = sender as TreeListView;
        if (treeListView != null)
        {
            SetIsUpdating(treeListView, true);
            SetSelectedItem(treeListView, treeListView.SelectedItem);
            SetIsUpdating(treeListView, false);
        }
    }
    #endregion
}

You can then use this in your XAML as:

<TreeView  helper:BindableSelectedItemHelper.Attach="True" 
           helper:BindableSelectedItemHelper.SelectedItem="{Binding SelectedItem, Mode=TwoWay}">
share|improve this answer

A more elegant and generic solution can be:

private void TreeView_OnSelectedItemChanged(object sender, RoutedPropertyChangedEventArgs<object> e)
{
    Model.SelectedCluster = (e as Cluster).NewValue;
}

Using the 'as' keyword allows Visual Studio to autocomplete your code as well in a very nice manner. :)

share|improve this answer

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