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Why when I'm using jdbc to do inserts into my data base my table auto_increments gets jacked-up.

Example Of totally empty tables being populated:

Dog table

DogId DogName
3     Woofer
4     Kujo
5     Spike

Owner Table

OwnerId DogID OwnerName
6       3     George
7       4     John
8       5     Sam

Desired Results

Dog table

DogId DogName
1     Woofer
2     Kujo
3     Spike

Owner Table

OwnerId DogID OwnerName
1       1     George
2       2     John
3       3     Sam

Actual code:

 public void insertStuff(Something d)
  {
    Connection con = null;

    try
    {
      Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver");
      con = (Connection) DriverManager.getConnection(
          "jdbc:mysql://" + this.getServer() + "/" + this.getDatabase(), user,
          password);
      con.setAutoCommit(false);

      Statement s1 = (Statement) con.createStatement();
      s1.executeUpdate("INSERT IGNORE INTO DOG (DOG_NAME) VALUES(\""
          + d.getDogName() + "\")");

      Statement s2 = (Statement) con.createStatement();
      s2.executeUpdate("INSERT IGNORE INTO OWNER (DOG_ID,OWNER_TITLE) VALUES ("
          + "(SELECT DOG_ID FROM DEVICE WHERE DOG_NAME =\""
          + d.getDogName()
          + "\"),\"" + d.getOWNER() + "\")");

      Statement s3 = (Statement) con.createStatement();
      s3.executeUpdate("INSERT IGNORE INTO KENNEL " + "("
          + "KENNEL_NAME,+ "OWNER_ID) " + "VALUES " + "( \""
          + d.getKennelName()
          + "\","
          + "\""
          + ","
          + "(SELECT OWNER_ID FROM OWNER WHERE OWNER_TITLE=\""
          + d.getOWNER() + "\")" + ")");

      }

      con.commit();

    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
      if (con != null)
        try
        {
          con.rollback();
        }
        catch (SQLException e1)
        {
          // TODO Auto-generated catch block
          e1.printStackTrace();
        }

      e.printStackTrace();
    }
    finally
    {
      if (con != null)
        try
        {
          con.close();
        }
        catch (SQLException e)
        {
          // TODO Auto-generated catch block
          e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
  }
share|improve this question
    
Can you post some code? Show us your create table statement and the code you're using to do the inserts. –  Sam Dufel Apr 3 '12 at 20:25
    
@SamDufel There ya go. posted above in the edit –  stackoverflow Apr 3 '12 at 20:36
    
@Sam these tables are created once and inserted n times. There is no create/delete happening –  stackoverflow Apr 3 '12 at 20:47
    
Try running "truncate dog; truncate owner;" and then re-running your insert code, it will just work. –  BluesRockAddict Apr 3 '12 at 20:55
1  
I see, from your question it wasn't clear that you're not using dummy data sets. Then resetting auto_increment would be your best option. Or maybe you're trying to "fix" the ids with existing data in those tables (i.e. without re-inserting)? –  BluesRockAddict Apr 3 '12 at 21:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Only two scenarios I know about are:

(1) some records have been deleted

(2) there is some trigger on table that modify such id

Please note that even you made fresh inserts to empty table, if there were previously some rows, emptying table don't reset auto-increment ID counter and it continues on order from last issued number, not from the number of actual records in table...

share|improve this answer
    
How do I make sure every table with auto_increment starts at one then? –  stackoverflow Apr 3 '12 at 20:38
1  
@stackoverflow - (1) alter table myTable auto_increment = 1 or (2) create a new table and start over –  Ωmega Apr 3 '12 at 20:41
    
Is there any way to set auto_increment default=1 or something along those lines? –  stackoverflow Apr 3 '12 at 20:42
1  
@stackoverflow - An integer or floating-point column can have the additional attribute AUTO_INCREMENT. When you insert a value of NULL (recommended) or 0 into an indexed AUTO_INCREMENT column, the column is set to the next sequence value. Typically this is value+1, where value is the largest value for the column currently in the table. AUTO_INCREMENT sequences begin with 1. For a multiple-row insert, LAST_INSERT_ID() and mysql_insert_id() actually return the AUTO_INCREMENT key from the first of the inserted rows. –  Ωmega Apr 3 '12 at 20:51
1  
@stackoverflow - yes, it will... The above CREATE TABLE with ENGINE=InnoDB was just an example, but it is same for ENGINE=MyISAM –  Ωmega Apr 3 '12 at 20:56

Auto-increment values can also be affected by inserting a row within a transaction, then backing out of the transaction.

You can always reset the auto_increment value on mysql directly:

alter table <tablename> auto_increment = <some_number>;

But honestly, what does it matter? The values need to be unique, but they shouldn't indicate an order.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point and rightly so I just wanted to make extra sure there wasn't something totally wrong going on here –  stackoverflow Apr 3 '12 at 21:29

Most likely you have previously deleted rows from tables Dog/Owner which increased auto increment number. You'd need to reset it (or just do DROP/CREATE for those tables and reinsert the data):

ALTER TABLE Dog AUTO_INCREMENT = 1;
ALTER TABLE Owner AUTO_INCREMENT = 1;

Yet another way to accomplish the same is to run truncate:

TRUNCATE Dog;
TRUNCATE OWNER;

This will delete the data and reset the index.

share|improve this answer
    
This is an example of a fresh insert. I do no deletes or any drops when this happens –  stackoverflow Apr 3 '12 at 20:22
    
Yes, but you do it on existing tables. –  BluesRockAddict Apr 3 '12 at 20:25

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