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I have an inelegant solution for what I need, but am looking for an elegant solution to replace it.

The following code doesn't compile, but represents what I would like to do:

interface IWebService
{
}

abstract class BaseClient<T>
{
}

class SpecializedClient : BaseClient<IWebService>
{
}

class ClientHelper<T> where T : BaseClient<*>
{
}

Where the T in ClientHelper<T> is any class that extends BaseClient regardless of the templated type passed in.

The inelegant solution I found is:

class ClientHelper<T, U> where T : BaseClient<U> {}

The reason this becomes inelegant is my project ends up with a class similar to:

class MyClass<A, B, C, D, E, F, G> where A  : MyBaseClass<B, C, D, E, F, G>

All the way down to the base class that takes a single type. Is this simply the cost of having a complex inheritance tree of generic classes or is there a simpler way to do this while retaining type restrictions on the templated types?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your "inelegant" solution is the right one if the public interface of BaseClient exposes it's generic type parameter in any way.

So assuming BaseClient is not as you defined it:

abstract class BaseClient<T>
{
   //Something about T here
}

Then T is part of the public interface contract of BaseClient, and therefore part of the public interface contract of ClientHelper (again, assuming that BaseClient<U> is exposed via the interface of ClientHelper).

On the other hand, let's assume it actually is as your example puts it:

abstract class BaseClient<T>
{
   //Nothing about T here
}

In that case, you can do:

interface IBaseClient
{
   //Nothing about T here
}

abstract class BaseClient<T> : IBaseClient
{ 
    // Whatever you like here
}

and ClientHelper becomes:

class ClientHelper<T> where T : IBaseClient
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
The interface might work for part of it as some of my classes don't publicly expose T they simply use it internally. I'll take any simplification I can get as it is beginning to become unwieldy. –  Foran Apr 4 '12 at 3:51
    
That simplified all cases where I have Class<T> where T is never publicly exposed. Simple, yet so obvious I couldn't see it. :-) It cut out roughly half of the types that need to be forwarded around. –  Foran Apr 4 '12 at 4:04
    
Cool. Glad it worked out for you. You might also be able to eliminate the some additional generic parameters if you can generalize all of the operations for a given T (methods, properties, events, and fields) that are not type-dependent into interfaces. –  Chris Shain Apr 4 '12 at 4:19

One option seems to be:

interface IWebService
{
}

interface IClient<out T>
{
}

abstract class BaseClient<T> : IClient<T>
{
}

class SpecializedClient : BaseClient<IWebService>
{
}

class ClientHelper<T> where T : IClient<object>
{
}

However that will only work if you BaseClient only returns T and never accepts it.

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