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In some code that I have to maintain, I have seen a format specifier %*s . Can anybody tell me what this is and why it is used?

An example of its usage is like:

fprintf(outFile, "\n%*s", indent, "");
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4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

It's used to specify, in a dynamic way, what the width of the field is:

  • The width is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.

so "indent" specifies how much space to allocate for the string that follows it in the parameter list.

So,

printf("%*s", 5, "");

is the same as

printf("%5s", "");

It's a nice way to put some spaces in your file, avoiding a loop.

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Thanks for the clarification. I googled a bit but couldn't find the answer. –  Aamir Jun 16 '09 at 10:11
    
I can't get this to work with sscanf –  Ethan Heilman Jan 24 '10 at 3:32
2  
@EthanHeilman, the * means something COMPLETELY different in the scanf family of functions. –  John Hascall Sep 6 at 20:56

* Causes fprintf to pad the output until it is n characters wide, where n is an integer value stored in the a function argument just preceding that represented by the modified type.

printf("%*d", 5, 10) //will result in "10" being printed with a width of 5.
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http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/printf/

The width is not specified in the format string, but as an additional integer value argument preceding the argument that has to be formatted.

e.g: printf("%*s", 4, myValue); is equivelant to printf("%4s", myValue);.

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Don't use "%*s" on a buffer which is not NULL terminated (packed) thinking that it will print only "length" field.

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