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I have simple entity:

public class Hall
{
    [Key]
    public int Id {get; set;}

    public string Name [get; set;}
}

Then in the Seed method I use AddOrUpdate to populate table:

var hall1 = new Hall { Name = "French" };
var hall2 = new Hall { Name = "German" };
var hall3 = new Hall { Name = "Japanese" };

context.Halls.AddOrUpdate(
    h => h.Name,
    hall1,
    hall2,
    hall3
);

Then I run in the Package Management Console:

Add-Migration Current
Update-Database

It's all fine: I have three rows in the table "Hall". But if I run in the Package Management Console Update-Database again I have already five rows:

Id  Name
1   French
2   Japaneese
3   German
4   French
5   Japanese

Why? I think it is should be three rows again, not five. I tried to use Id property instead of Name but it does not make the difference.

UPDATE:

This code produces the same result:

var hall1 = new Hall { Id = 1, Name = "French" };
var hall2 = new Hall { Id = 2, Name = "German" };
var hall3 = new Hall { Id = 3, Name = "Japanese" };

context.Halls.AddOrUpdate(
                h => h.Id,
                hall1);

context.Halls.AddOrUpdate(
                h => h.Id,
                hall2);

context.Halls.AddOrUpdate(
                h => h.Id,
                hall3);

Also I have the latest EntityFramework installed via nuget.

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What happens if you use separate call to AddOrUpdate for every record? It is quite strange that you have 5 records. It means that it worked once so there must be something special in your. –  Ladislav Mrnka Apr 4 '12 at 8:34
    
@Ladislav Mrnka: The same thing for separate calls. –  YYY Apr 4 '12 at 8:37
    
Look at this: - thedatafarm.com/blog/data-access/… –  Kirin Yao Apr 5 '12 at 6:31
    
Thanks a lot. I've already seen this page. Unfortunately, I haven't found any interesting in this article that can solve my issue. –  YYY Apr 5 '12 at 13:38
1  
I have the same problem, any one else? –  Daryn Nov 3 '12 at 20:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Ok I was banging my face off the keyboard for an hour with this. If your table's Id field is an Identity field then it won't work so use a different one for identifierExpression. I used the Name property and also removed the Id field from the new Hall {...} initializer.

This tweak to the OPs code worked for me so I hope it helps someone:

protected override void Seed(HallContext context)
{
    context.Halls.AddOrUpdate(
        h => h.Name,   // Use Name (or some other unique field) instead of Id
        new Hall
        {
            Name = "Hall 1"
        },
        new Hall
        {
            Name = "Hall 2"
        });

    context.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Good answer thank you. But this is another annoying thing in the framework that just doesn't' work right. –  Byron Whitlock Apr 20 at 0:09

This code works:

public Configuration()
{
    AutomaticMigrationsEnabled = true;
}

protected override void Seed(HallContext context)
{
    context.Halls.AddOrUpdate(
        h => h.Id,
        new Hall
        {
            Id = 1,
            Name = "Hall 1"
        },
        new Hall
        {
            Id = 2,
            Name = "Hall 2"
        });

    context.SaveChanges();
}
share|improve this answer
2  
It might work, but it's not correct. ID is generated on the server. Run it and SQL will use 1 and 2 for the first two ID's. Then delete those rows and run it again, Id = 1, will be ignored and SQL will use ID=3, 4 when they are inserted next. Or change the Id's to 99, 100 in the code above. Drop the DB, Run the seed method and it won't use 99, 100, but SQL will use 1 and 2. Also, if those seed rows are deleted, each seed run will insert the same data again because ID won't match. Much better to use Name as the unique field. –  RickAnd - MSFT Feb 10 at 1:20
1  
So you suggest to mark Ciaran Bruen's answer as correct? I just can not check it now –  YYY Feb 13 at 9:21

This can also be caused if you're setting the Entity State incorrectly. I kept getting the following error when I'd run update-database..."Sequence contains more than one matching element."

For example, I had duplicate rows being created on each update-database command (which of course is not supposed to happen when seeding data), and then the next update-database command wouldn't work at all since it found more than one match (hence the sequence error saying I have more than one matching row). That's because I had overridden SaveChanges in my context file with a method call to ApplyStateChanges...

public override int SaveChanges()
{
    this.ApplyStateChanges();
    return base.SaveChanges();
}

I was using ApplyStateChanges to ensure that when adding object graphs, Entity Framework knows explicitly whether the object is in an added or modified state. The entire explanation on how I'm using ApplyStateChanges can be found here.

And this works great (but the caveat!!)...if you're also seeding the database using CodeFirst migrations, then the above method will cause havoc for the AddOrUpdate() call within the Seed Method. So before anything else, just check your DBContext file and ensure you're not overriding SaveChanges in the way above, or you will end up getting duplicate data running the update-database command a second time, and then won't work at all the third time since there's more than one row for each matching item.

When it comes down to it, you don't need to configure the Id in AddOrUpdate()...that defeats the whole purpose of easy and initial database seeding. It works fine by something like:

context.Students.AddOrUpdate(
    p => p.StudentName,
    new Student { StudentName = "Bill Peters" },
    new Student { StudentName = "Jandra Nancy" },
    new Student { StudentName = "Rowan Miller" },
    new Student { StudentName = "James O'Dalley" },

just AS LONG as I'm not overriding the SaveChanges method in my context file with a call to ApplyStateChanges. Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

I have found that AddOrUpdate works fine with fields that are not ID's. If this works for you: context.Halls.AddOrUpdate(h => h.Name, hall1, hall2, hall3)

You may want to use Hall names like 'French_test_abc_100', 'German_test_abc_100' etc.

That stops hard coded test data messing things up when you are testing your app.

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If object(hall)'s id is 0, it is a insertion. I think you need to double check the id field of your hall objects

share|improve this answer
    
I updated my question: the result is the same. –  YYY Apr 4 '12 at 9:32
    
It should work, the logic seems to be right. Possibly, the commit is missing, or some other bugs in the code that you are not showing. possibly create a timestamp in a new column to confirm this situation. –  weeyoung Apr 4 '12 at 9:38
    
there is nothing more in my code. –  YYY Apr 4 '12 at 10:04

Is your ID field an Identity field? I was running into this same issue. When I removed the Identity status from my ID field and set the IDs going into the database, that resolved the issue.

That worked for me, since these were look-up tables and shouldn't have been identity fields, anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, it is an identity field. I added condition if table is not empty then seed table. –  YYY May 12 '12 at 15:38

I think it's likely that you need to back out existing database migrations (i.e. start your database from scratch) with something like 'Update-Database TargetMigration:0' followed by 'Update-Database'.

As it is, you're not dropping the existing table or values, you're just add/updating those values. That needs to happen in order to get your desired result.

Here's a good reference for EF migrations: http://elegantcode.com/2012/04/12/entity-framework-migrations-tips/

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