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I want to check if a "particular" class is applied to a span inside a div or not.So i tried

$('#div').click(function() {
     console.log($(this).find('.myImgClass').length);  // returns 0-if not found
                                                      // 1 if found
}

HTMl

<div>
 <span class="myImgClass"></span>
</div>

Is this the right way to do it ?

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2  
Yeah, that's fine... there is no right or wrong anyway. Depending on what exactly you want to do, e.g. if you want to filter the divs, you can also use .has: api.jquery.com/has –  Felix Kling Apr 4 '12 at 8:41
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should do the trick,

$('div').click(function() {
  alert("Spans with .myImgClass: " + $(this).children('span.myImgClass').length);
});

Example on JSFiddle.net

If you only need divs with the class then:

$('div > span.myImgClass').click(function() {
  var theSpan = $(this);
  var theDiv = theSpan.parent();
  alert("Div with Span with .myImgClass.");
});
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thank you erik. –  user1184100 Apr 4 '12 at 9:00
    
I think div > span.myImgClass: should be div > span.myImgClass, right? But $('div > span.myImgClass') would select the span elements, not the divs, hence the click event handler is bound to the span elements. –  Felix Kling Apr 4 '12 at 9:53
    
Yeah thanks for the correction! –  Erik Philips Apr 4 '12 at 9:55
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Use jQuery.hasClass() method to do that:

var hasMyImgClassClass = $("span").hasClass("myImgClass");
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But that does not tell you whether the element has a descendant with that class. –  Felix Kling Apr 4 '12 at 8:40
1  
I think he meant $("div > span") –  Erik Philips Apr 4 '12 at 8:41
    
@Erik: Even then, in the context of this click event handler, .hasClass() is not particularly useful. You would have to get a reference to the span first in order to use it, e.g. $(this).find('span') and why wouldn't use the class name directly in the selector then? –  Felix Kling Apr 4 '12 at 8:45
    
Mine is only in reference to this answer (which needs more work), not the question. –  Erik Philips Apr 4 '12 at 8:46
    
@Erik Philips: I had to misunderstood OP intentions. ;) –  Crozin Apr 4 '12 at 8:54
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Your selector is wrong, div instead of #div

$('div').click(function() {
   console.log($(this).has('.myImgClass').length);
});
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1  
Note that .has returns jQuery object. –  Felix Kling Apr 4 '12 at 8:43
    
thank you nifty.. –  user1184100 Apr 4 '12 at 9:01
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$("div >span").click(function(){
 alert($(this).hasClass('myImgClass')) 
});
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This changes to which element the click event handler is bound to... why are you doing this? It seems the OP wants the click handler bound to the div. –  Felix Kling Apr 4 '12 at 8:49
    
thank you felix and manish –  user1184100 Apr 4 '12 at 9:01
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Looks right (apart from the div selector), but if you want to specifically check for spans change it to this:

$('div').click(function() {
     console.log($(this).find('span.myImgClass').length);  
});
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