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I'm trying for a while to work this out with no success so far I have a command output that I need to chew to make it suitable for further processing

The text I have is:

1/2 [3] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word word word 4/5

What I need is to extract only the numbers 1/2 [3] 4/5 so it will look:

1 2 3 4 5

So, basically I was trying to exclude all characters that are not digits, like "/", "[", "]", etc. I tried awk with FS, tried using regexp, but none of my tries were successful.

I would then add something to it like first:1 second:2 third:3 .... etc Please take in mind I'm talking about a file that contains a lot if lines with the same structure, but I already though about using awk to sum every column with

awk '{sum1+=$1 ; sum2+=$2 ;......etc} END {print "first:"sum1 " second:"sum2.....etc}'

But first I will need to extract only the relevant numbers, The date that is in between "( )" can be omitted completely but they are numbers too, so filtering merely by digits won't be enough as it will match them too

Hope you can help me out Thanks in advance!

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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This: sed -r 's/[(][^)]*[)]/ /g; s/[^0-9]+/ /g' should work. It makes two passes, removing parenthesized expressions first and then replacing all runs of non-digits with single spaces.

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GREAT! exactly what I needed! Here's how the entire command looks the file test.txt contains: 10/20 [30] (date) word word word word 40/50 10/20 [30] (date) word word word word 40/50 So, when running: cat test.txt | sed -r 's/[(][^)]*[)]/ /g; s/[^0-9]+/ /g' | awk '{sum1+=$1; sum2+=$2; sum3+=$3; sum4+=$4; sum5+=$5}END{print "first:"sum1, "second:"sum2, "third:"sum3, "fourth:"sum4, "fifth:"sum5}' and it's output: first:20 second:40 third:60 fourth:80 fifth:100 Thanks a lot @Michał Kosmulski You guys are great –  TuxSax Apr 4 '12 at 9:11
    
BTW, is there a way to make comments look better like answers and questions? Like code blocks and indentation, line breaks, etc. –  TuxSax Apr 4 '12 at 9:23
    
You're welcome. As for formatting, check out this page: stackoverflow.com/editing-help#comment-formatting –  Michał Kosmulski Apr 4 '12 at 9:34
    
Yeah, I tried, but it didn't seem to work... test code See? no line breaks! Anyway, thanks @MichałK –  TuxSax Apr 4 '12 at 9:37

You can do something like sed -e 's/(.*)//' -e 's/[^0-9]/ /g'. It deletes everything inside the round brackets, than substitutes all non-digit characters with a space. To get rid of extra spaces you can feed it to column -t:

$ echo '1/2 [3] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word word word 4/5' | sed -e 's/(.*)//' -e 's/[^0-9]/ /g' | column -t
1  2  3  4  5
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1UP This was pretty much what I came up with. –  MattH Apr 4 '12 at 9:10

see below, if it is what you want:

kent$  echo "1/2 [3] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word word word 4/5"|sed -r 's/\([^)]*\)//g; s/[^0-9]/ /g'
1 2  3                       4 5

if you want it to look better:

kent$  echo "1/2 [3] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word word word 4/5"|sed -r 's/\([^)]*\)//g; s/[^0-9]/ /g;s/ */ /g'
 1 2 3 4 5
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This will give you digits extracted out excluding text in parenthesis:

digits=$(echo '1/2 [3] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word word word 4/5' |\
       sed 's/(.*)//' | grep -o '[0-9][0-9]*')
echo $digits

or pure sed solution:

echo '1/2 [3] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word word word 4/5' |\
sed -e 's/(.*)//' -e 's/[^0-9]/ /g' -e 's/[ \t][ \t]*/ /g'

OUTPUT:

1 2 3 4 5
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i was thinking about grep -o [0-9], however it will fail if the number has two digits, like 1/20 [35] ... –  Kent Apr 4 '12 at 8:56
    
I edited my answer and added another option based on pure sed. –  anubhava Apr 4 '12 at 9:01
 awk '{ first+=gensub("^([0-9]+)/.*","\\1","g",$0)
        second+=gensub("^[0-9]+/([0-9]+) .*","\\1","g",$0)
        thirdl+=gensub("^[0-9]+/[0-9]+ \[([0-9]+)\].*","\\1","g",$0)
        fourth+=gensub("^.* ([0-9]+)/[0-9]+ *$","\\1","g",$0)
        fifth+=gensub("^.* [0-9]+/([0-9]+) *$","\\1","g",$0)
      }
      END { print "first: " first " second: " second " third: " third " fourth: " fourth " fifth: " fifth
      }

Might work for you.

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one pass with awk is sufficient if you set a fancy field separator: any one of slash, space, open bracket or close bracket separates a field:

awk -F '[][/ ]' '
  {s1+=$1; s2+=$2; s3+=$4; s4+=$(NF-1); s5+=$NF}
  END {printf("first:%d second:%d third:%d fourth:%d fifth:%d\n", s1, s2, s3, s4, s5)}
'
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TXR:

@(collect)
@one/@two [@three] (@date @time) @(skip :greedy) @four/@five
@(filter :tonumber one two three four five)
@(end)
@(bind (first second third fourth fifth)
       @(mapcar (op apply +) (list one two three four five)))
@(output)
first:@first second:@second third:@third fourth:@fourth fifth:@fifth
@(end)

data:

1/2 [3] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word word word 4/5
10/20 [30] (27/03/2012 19:32:54) word word 40/50

run:

$ txr data.txr data.txt
first:11 second:22 third:33 fourth:44 fifth:55

Easy to add some error checking:

@(collect)
@  (cases)
@one/@two [@three] (@date @time) @(skip :greedy) @four/@five
@  (or)
@line
@  (throw error `badly formatted line: @line`)
@  (end)
@  (filter :tonumber one two three four five)
@(end)
@(bind (first second third fourth fifth)
       @(mapcar (op apply +) (list one two three four five)))
@(output)
first:@first second:@second third:@third fourth:@fourth fifth:@fifth
@(end)

$ txr data.txr -
foo bar junk
txr: unhandled exception of type error:
txr: ("badly formatted line: foo bar junk")
Aborted

TXR is for robust programming. There is strong typing, so you can't treat strings as numbers just because they contain digits. Variables have to be bound before use, and so misspelled variables do not silently default to zero or blank, but rather produce an unbound variable <name> in <file>:<line> type error. Text extraction is performed with lots of specific context to guard against misinterpreting input in one format as being in another format.

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