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I have a data structure "Person"

struct Person
{
  protected:
    string name;
    int age;
    string address;
    ...
}

I want to create "views" around this structure to separate out access to different member variables:

class PersonRead: public Person
{
  public:
    string getName() {..}
    int getAge() {...}
    ...
}
class PersonUpdate: public Person
{
  public:
    void setAddress( string address_ ) {...}
    void setAge( int age_ ) {...}
    ...
}

I use this to only expose those methods/variables which are really required:

int main()
{
...
    writePersonDataToFile ( (PersonRead) personObj );
    updatePersonData ( (PersonUpdate) personObj);
...
}

Though the above code serves my purpose, there are several issues including:

  1. The public inheritence here is not exactly an 'is-a' relationship

  2. I need to derive IndianPerson from Person, and all the corresponding interfaces. This leads to bad diamond pattern:

    struct IndianPerson: public Person {};
    class IndianPersonRead: public IndianPerson, public PersonRead {}; //Person Class common, Diamond pattern here!
    

Is there a name for such a design pattern? What are better ways to implement this pattern? I have a feeling Policy classes might help, but cant figure out how to implement this

Any examples would be great help

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

For your scenario this might seem like overkill but, if you want fine grained control over which classes can call different methods on your class the c++ client-attorney idiom idiom might be appropriate.

For a detailed description of this idiom see http://drdobbs.com/184402053

Here is a rough example (note: this has not been compiled, although it is based on production code I am currently using):

class Person
{
public:
   /// constructor destructor etc:

private:
    string getName() { return name; }

public:
    /// Writer Attourney that access to allows class PersonReader access 
    /// to getXXX functions
    class ReaderAttorney
    {
    private:
        /// Add additional reader member functions...
        static string readName( Person& p )
        { 
            return p.getName();
        }

        // Make any classes that shuold be allowde read access friends of the 
        // attorney here
        friend class PersonReader;
    };

    /// Writer Attourney that access to allows class PersonWriter access 
    /// to setXXX functions
    class WriterAttorney
    {
    private:
        /// Add additiona reader member functions...
        static string setName( Person& p, const string& newName )
        { 
            p.setName( newName );
        }
        friend class PersonWriter;
    };

private:
    string name;
    int age;
    string address;
};

This can be used as follows:

void PersonWriter::setPersonDetails( const string& name, int age .... )
{
   // PersonWriter is a frend of WriterAttorney and is granted access
   Person::WriterAttorney::setName( name );
   Person::WriterAttorney::setName( age );

   // Note this will fail, since PersonWriter is not a friend of 
   // ReaderAttorney, ergo it is not granted read permission:
   Person::ReaderAttorney::readName();
}
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I think that your approach is not correct at all: PersonRead and PersonUpdate are not Persons. They read and modify Person data but are not really Person.

In the same way, IndianPersonRead and IndianPersonUpdate are not an IndianPerson.

I separate this relationship in following:

  • PersonRead use Person
  • PersonUpdate use Person
  • IndianPerson inherits from Person: is a Person
  • IndianPersonRead inherits from PersonRead and use IndianPerson
  • IndianPersonUpdate inherits from PersonUpdate and use IndianPerson

I show an example of my apporach:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

struct Person
{
    string getname() const { return name; }
    string getaddress() const { return address; }
    void setaddress(const string & address_) { address = address_; }
    void setname(const string & name_) { name = name_; }

    protected:
        string name;
        int age;
        string address;
};

class PersonRead
{
    public:
        string getname(const Person & p) { return p.getname(); }
};

class PersonUpdate
{
    public:
        void setAddress(Person & p, const string & address_ ) {p.setaddress(address_); }
        void setname(Person & p, const string & name_ ) {p.setname(name_); }
};

struct IndianPerson : public Person
{
    string gettribe() const { return tribe; }
    void settribe(const string & tribe_) { tribe = tribe_; }
    protected:
    string tribe;
};

struct IndianPersonRead : public PersonRead
{
    public:
        string gettribe(const IndianPerson & p) const { return p.gettribe(); }
};

struct IndianPersonUpdate : public PersonUpdate
{
    public:
    void settribe(IndianPerson & p, const string & t)   { p.settribe(t); }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    IndianPerson ip;
    IndianPersonUpdate ipU;
    IndianPersonRead ipR;

    ipU.settribe(ip, "Cheroki");
    ipU.setname(ip, "Charly");
    cout << ipR.getname(ip) << " : " << ipR.gettribe(ip) << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1: I agree that this improves the use of inheritance. However, it's still annoying to use this hierarchy when trying to write something like the writePersonDataToFile sketched in the question: such a function can't possibly take the correct type (const Person&) and yet work correctly for e.g. IndianPerson instances - unless each Person knows how to serialize itself. Assuming that you don't want to have a 'serialize' method in each Person, you probably want a tree of PersonSerializer classes (instead of PersonRead). –  Frerich Raabe Apr 4 '12 at 10:55

First of all I will agree with the Tio's point of view PersonUpdate is not a Person so there is a wrong inheritance usage. Also I believe that you need to make your classes with target to represent the real world so classes like PersonUpdate are wrong because they represent the action and not the object.

In your case one solution could be to use the visitor design pattern, so the Person could accept a especially designed IPersonStream interface in order to perform the serialization in classes which will implement this interface. Person stream will accept the persons attributes on it or for good the Person's memento take a look on memento design pattern, and serialize it to xml or whatever you want.

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I don't have a design pattern name, but to resolve your concerns, I would swap the inheritance relation and let Person inherit from the PersonReader and PersonWriter interfaces. This way, objects that must only read from Person use the PersonReader interface and as such promises to not change it.

By making every member of Person private, you can even make sure that Person is not accessed in another way, but then every class that inherits from Person should have these members private.

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