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I have just started with Python. When I execute a python script file on Windows, the output window appears but instantaneously goes away. I need it to stay there so I can analyze my output. How can I keep it open?

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2  
A belated +1000. I'm using python as a teaching language for a friend who uses Windows, and I could not believe how much trouble it was (at least based on existing documentation) getting to where we could run a script and see the output. –  Jefromi Jul 23 '11 at 18:08
    
Thanks Jefromi. –  movingahead Jul 27 '11 at 18:45

8 Answers 8

up vote 56 down vote accepted

You have a few options:

  1. Run the program from an already-open terminal. Open a command prompt and type:

    python myscript.py
    

    For that to work you need the python executable in your path. Just check on how to edit environment variables on Windows, and add C:\PYTHON26 (or whatever directory you installed python to).

    When the program ends, it'll drop you back to the cmd prompt instead of closing the window.

  2. Add code to wait at the end of your script. Adding ...

    raw_input()
    

    ... at the end of the script makes it wait for the Enter key. That method is annoying because you have to modify the script, and have to remember removing it when you're done. Specially annoying when testing other people's scripts.

  3. Use an editor that pauses for you. Some editors prepared for python will automatically pause for you after execution. Other editors allow you to configure the command line it uses to run your program. I find it particularly useful to configure it as "python -i myscript.py" when running. That drops you to a python shell after the end of the program, with the program environment loaded, so you may further play with the variables and call functions and methods.

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2  
+1 to item 3. I use Scite as my Python editor and it simply keeps the output in its own output window. This is really useful because you can potentially see the output of more than one run in a single window. –  Joris Timmermans Jun 16 '09 at 12:14
    
I am able to see the output by running it from an already open terminal. But I need to give the complete script address in the python command? Can that be avoided? When I use the raw_input() method, it gives me NameError: name 'raw_input'is not defined. Can you suggest an editor which automatically pauses after execution? –  movingahead Jun 16 '09 at 12:20
1  
@movingahead: maybe you are using python 3? in python 3 it was renamed to input(). But I would use python 2.6 for now, since python 3 lacks important third party libraries that haven't been ported yet. (see other questions on python 2vs3). About editor, I don't use windows, notepad++ lets you configure the command. I use emacs which has a windows version, but I never used it. –  nosklo Jun 16 '09 at 13:30
    
@nosklo thanks!! Yah I am using Python 3. Doing basic stuff now so shouldn't be much of an issue. I will try notepad++. Am currently trying out Pydev for Eclipse –  movingahead Jun 16 '09 at 14:25

cmd /k is the typical way to open any console application (not only Python) with a console window that will remain after the application closes. The easiest way I can think to do that, is to press Win+R, type cmd /k and then drag&drop the script you want to the Run dialog.

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yah it works out too –  movingahead Jun 24 '09 at 13:44
1  
Fantastic answer. You should have got this. –  Jagu Oct 26 '11 at 6:08
1  
Just fyi for the python os.system command you would do os.system( "cmd /k " + myAppPath + " " + myFlagsString ) –  Jared Glass Dec 6 '11 at 8:01
    
cmd /k is Windows-only. I can't help with a Mac alternative, sorry. –  tzot Mar 9 '12 at 17:20

Start the script from already open cmd window or at the end of script add something like this

 raw_input("press enter to exit ;)")
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1  
"Any key" won't work, only Enter will (or Ctrl+D, depending on where we are). –  Daniel Andersson Nov 2 '13 at 18:01
    
@DanielAndersson yep, changed the text –  Anurag Uniyal Nov 3 '13 at 23:17
4  
If you think about it, it's kind of deep that only "enter" will allow you to "exit"... –  Joel B Nov 5 '13 at 23:54

you can combine the answers before: (for Notepad++ User)

press F5 to run current script and type in command:

cmd /k python -i "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"

in this way you stay in interactive mode after executing your Notepad++ python script and you are able to play around with your variables and so on :)

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To keep your window open in case of exception (yet, while printing the exception using http://stackoverflow.com/a/3702726/2436175)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    try:
        ## your code, typically one function call
    except:
        import sys
        print sys.exc_info()[0]
        import traceback
        print traceback.format_exc()
        print "Press Enter to continue ..." 
        raw_input() 

To keep the window open in any case:

if __name__ == '__main__':
    try:
        ## your code, typically one function call
    except:
        import sys
        print sys.exc_info()[0]
        import traceback
        print traceback.format_exc()
    finally:
        print "Press Enter to continue ..." 
        raw_input()
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To just keep the window open I agree with Anurag and this is what I did to keep my windows open for short little calculation type programs.

This would just show a cursor with no text:

raw_input() 

This next example would give you a clear message that the program is done and not waiting on another input prompt within the program:

print('You have reached the end and the "raw_input()" function is keeping the window open') 
raw_input()

Note!
(1) In python 3, there is no raw_input(), just input().
(2) Use single quotes to indicate a string; otherwise if you type doubles around anything, such as "raw_input()", it will think it is a function, variable, etc, and not text.

In this next example, I use double quotes and it won't work because it thinks there is a break in the quotes between "the" and "function" even though when you read it, your own mind can make perfect sense of it:

print("You have reached the end and the "input()" function is keeping the window open")
input()

Hopefully this helps others who might be starting out and still haven't figured out how the computer thinks yet. It can take a while. :o)

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I had a similar problem. With Notepad++ I used to use the command : C:\Python27\python.exe "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)" which closed the cmd windows immediately after the code terminated. Now I am using cmd /k c:\Python27\python.exe "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)" which keeps the cmd window open.

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You may want to add ";C:\Python27" to the end of your Path environment variable. That way it can be shortened to 'cmd /k python -i "$(FULL_CURRENT_PATH)"' - Exactly what the answer above says plus the useful -i. –  Enigma Dec 12 '12 at 23:34
  1. Go here and download and install Notepad++
  2. Go here and download and install Python 2.7 not 3.
  3. Start, Run Powershell. Enter the following. [Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", "$env:Path;C:\Python27", "User")
  4. Close Powershell and reopen it.
  5. Make a directory for your programs. mkdir scripts
  6. Open that directory cd scripts
  7. In Notepad++, in a new file type: print "hello world"
  8. Save the file as hello.py
  9. Go back to powershell and make sure you are in the right directory by typing dir. You should see your file hello.py there.
  10. At the Powershell prompt type: python hello.py
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