Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
bash-3.00# /usr/sbin/ip -6 route show
default via fdc6:3001:8e20:9ce9::1 dev int0  metric 1024  expires 2133437sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
unreachable default dev lo  proto none  metric -1  error -101 metric10 255
unreachable default dev lo  proto none  metric -1  error -101 metric10 255
unreachable default dev lo  proto none  metric -1  error -101 metric10 255
fdc6:3001:8e20:b06::/64 dev ext0  metric 256  expires 2132985sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
fdc6:3001:8e20:9ce9::/64 dev int0  metric 256  expires 2132977sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
fe80::/64 dev int0  metric 256  expires 2132977sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
fe80::/64 dev ext0  metric 256  expires 2132985sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
default via fe80::226:88ff:fee2:5d01 dev int0  proto kernel  metric 1024  expires 154sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 64
default via fe80::226:88ff:fee2:5d02 dev ext0  proto kernel  metric 1024  expires 175sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 64
default via fdc6:3001:8e20:b06::1 dev ext0  metric 1024  expires 2133059sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
unreachable default dev lo  proto none  metric -1  error -101 metric10 255
ff00::/8 dev int0  metric 256  expires 2132977sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
ff00::/8 dev ext0  metric 256  expires 2132985sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
unreachable default dev lo  proto none  metric -1  error -101 metric10 255

In the output above, does the ordering of the routes indicate the order in which the routes are looked-up? Or does the 'hoplimit' (the last column) influence the ordering of the lookup? What's the difference between 'hoplimit' and 'metric', and which of the two influence the lookup order?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
The specific reason for asking the question is that when a client in the same subnet as the server - whose routes are mentioned above - initiates a connection to it, the server responds with the destination address of the gateway (fdc6:3001:8e20:9ce9::1) instead of talking to the client directly. But when I delete the default gateway, then the connection goes through with the server. –  Maddy Apr 4 '12 at 11:45
    
When I add the route back again, more often than not, it shows up at the top again and prevents the connection again. Shouldn't the best match be considered for the route (fdc6:3001:8e20:9ce9::/64, in this case) for the case of subnet? Any thoughts? –  Maddy Apr 4 '12 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

  1. Routes are first looked up by longest match. So if there is a /64 route, a /48 route, and a default route (which is /0) which all match the destination of the packet, the /64 route will be used and the others will be ignored.

    Example: given a destination of fdc6:3001:8e20:9ce9:1:2:3:4 and the following routes:

    default via fdc6:3001:8e20:9ce9::1 dev int0  metric 1024  expires 2133437sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
    fdc6:3001:8e20:9ce9::/64 dev int0  metric 256  expires 2132977sec mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295
    

    The /64 route will always be chosen.

    This is notwithstanding your comment that implies otherwise. What you describe in your comment shouldn't happen. Please provide the exact source and destination IP addresses and source and destination MAC addresses of the problematic packet to diagnose this further.

  2. In case there are multiple routes to the destination with the same prefix length, the one(s) with the best metric is preferred.

    You don't have any examples in your routing table where ties are broken by metric. You'd need routes with the same destination and prefix length but different metrics.

  3. If there are still multiple routes, load balancing over each of the available paths takes place.

The hoplimit is not used at all in the route lookup process. It is used to set the hop limit of locally originated outgoing packets after the choice of route has been made.

share|improve this answer
    
The client packet details: Source address: fdc6:3001:8e20:b06:dd9c:57d1:8240:8caa Destination address: fdc6:3001:8e20:b06::171 - Corresponding MAC addresses: 00:50:56:86:07:94 and 00:18:7d:1c:a9:71. The server packet details: Source address: fdc6:3001:8e20:b06::171 Destination address: fdc6:3001:8e20:b06:dd9c:57d1:8240:8caa - MAC addresses: 00:18:7d:1c:a9:71 and 00:26:88:e2:5d:02. The server is sending the packet to the MAC address 00:26:88:e2:5d:02, which belongs to the gateway. –  Maddy Apr 5 '12 at 4:24
    
Weird. What is the output of ip route get fdc6:3001:8e20:b06:dd9c:57d1:8240:8caa on the server? –  Celada Apr 5 '12 at 14:20
    
$ /usr/sbin/ip route get fdc6:3001:8e20:b06:dd9c:57d1:8240:8caa fdc6:3001:8e20:b06:dd9c:57d1:8240:8caa via fdc6:3001:8e20:b06:dd9c:57d1:8240:8caa dev ext0 src fdc6:3001:8e20:b06::171 metric 0 cache mtu 1500 advmss 1440 metric10 4294967295 –  Maddy Apr 5 '12 at 15:53
    
The output of that command confirms that it should really be going direct, not through the gateway. ip route get is supposed to show you exactly the route that packets will actually take. I have no idea why your server is sending packets to the gateway instead. Sorry. –  Celada Apr 5 '12 at 16:29
    
I learned a few things from your comments. Thanks, again. –  Maddy Apr 6 '12 at 4:09

The route lookup for IPv6 is not fundamentally different from legacy IPv4.

The IP stack will find the route which best matches (i.e. longest prefix) the target IP and has the lowest metric.

The hop limit does not influence the routing decision. The metric indicates the 'cost' of the route. It's supposed to be set based on the number of hops to the destination and the bandwidth, latency, price, ... of the route. The hop limit is merely used to pre-set the hop limit field in the IPv6 header.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.