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This is my code:

int ** allocateSpace( int row, int col){
int i; int **a; a = malloc(sizeof(int *) * row); for(i = 0; i < row; i ++)
a[i] = malloc(sizeof(int) * col);
return a; }

My goal is to allocate certain spaces for a matrix with rows and columns given by the parameters, and return the pointers pointing to the matrix.

The above code works well.

But when I change the code to the following form:

void allocateSpace(int **a, int row, int col){
    int i;
    a = malloc(sizeof(int *) * row);
    for(i = 0; i < row; i ++)
      a[i] = malloc(sizeof(int) * col);
}

It seems like when returning from the allocateSpace function, the memory allocated was released(since I got a segmentation fault). But why? I mean I just wanna allocate certain memory for a given pointer, and it's all done in the subfunction.

Please tell me the reason why I got a seg error and the difference between the two function listed above. Thank you very much!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem is that you are trying to change a pointer that is passed by value:

void allocateSpace(int **a, int row, int col){
  // ...
}

int** a here is passed by value (i.e. the pointer value is copied to the stack in order to use it as function parameter).

When you then do

a = malloc(sizeof(int *) * row);

you change only the copy of the pointer and once the function returns, your change is discarded.

The solution is to pass the pointer by reference, i.e.

void allocateSpace(int ***a, int row, int col){
//...
}

and change the real value by following the reference:

*a = malloc(sizeof(int *) * row);
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Because you need to pass in a pointer to a pointer to a pointer in order to assign the allocated memory:

void allocateSpace(int ***a, int row, int col){
    int i;
    *a = malloc(sizeof(int *) * row);
    for(i = 0; i < row; i ++)
      ( *a )[i] = malloc(sizeof(int) * col);
}

And to call it you would need to pass the address of an int**:

int** ppData;

allocateSpace( &ppData, 10, 10 );
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1  
+1 you got your answer in just before me and put an example of how to call. –  JeremyP Apr 4 '12 at 10:32

In the second case you are modifying the function's parameter a - that is a local copy passed by value. So, if you call the function like: allocateSpace(myptr,N,M), myptr will not be modifed - a copy local to the function will. Therefore, myptr contains whatever it contained before the call - possibly garbage. You would need to change the function param to: int ***a (oh the horror) and then put an additional * (dereference op) before each reference to a in the function body.

Compare this to the situation where you want to modify a simple int in a function - the param should be int * and assignments in function body should go to *a. Same applies here - one additional level of dereference is needed to achieve your goal.

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In the second function int **a is passed by value (the pointer) so changes in the function dont affect the caller's function. You have to pass this value by reference.

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