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I want to implement a small android application, that works as SSL Server. After lot of problems with the right format of the keystore, I solved this and run into the next one.

My keystore file is properly loaded by the KeyStore class. But when I try to open the server socket (socket.accept()) the following error is raised:

javax.net.ssl.SSLException: Could not find any key store entries to support the enabled cipher suites.

I generated my keystore with this command:

keytool -genkey -keystore test.keystore -keyalg RSA -keypass ssltest -storepass ssltest -storetype BKS -provider org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider -providerpath bcprov.jar

with the Unlimited Strength Jurisdiction Policy for Java SE6 applied to my jre6.

I got a list of supported ciphers suites by calling

socket.getSupportedCipherSuites()

that prints a long list with very different combinations. But I don't know how to get a supported key. I also tried the android debug keystore after converting it to BKS format using portecle but get still the same error.

Can anyone help and tell how I can generate a key that is compatible with one of the cipher suites?

Version Information:

targetSDK: 15
tested on emulator running 4.0.3 and real device running 2.3.3
BounceCastle 1.46
portecle 1.7

Code of my test application:

public class SSLTestActivity extends Activity implements Runnable {
SSLServerSocket mServerSocket;
ToggleButton tglBtn;

/** Called when the activity is first created. */
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.main);

    this.tglBtn = (ToggleButton)findViewById(R.id.toggleButton1);

    tglBtn.setOnCheckedChangeListener(new CompoundButton.OnCheckedChangeListener() {

        @Override
        public void onCheckedChanged(CompoundButton buttonView, boolean isChecked) {
            if (isChecked) {
                new Thread(SSLTestActivity.this).run();
            } else {
                try {
                    if (mServerSocket != null)
                        mServerSocket.close();
                } catch (IOException e) {
                    Log.e("SSLTestActivity", e.toString());
                }
            }
        }
    });
}

@Override
public void run() {
    try {
        KeyStore keyStore = KeyStore.getInstance(KeyStore.getDefaultType());
        keyStore.load(getAssets().open("test.keystore"), "ssltest".toCharArray());

        ServerSocketFactory socketFactory = SSLServerSocketFactory.getDefault();
        mServerSocket = (SSLServerSocket) socketFactory.createServerSocket(8080);
        while (!mServerSocket.isClosed()) {
            Socket client = mServerSocket.accept();
            PrintWriter output = new PrintWriter(client.getOutputStream(), true);
            output.println("So long, and thanks for all the fish!");
            client.close();
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        Log.e("SSLTestActivity", e.toString());
    }
}
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Keystore does not support enabled cipher suites

It's not really up to the keystore to support or not a cipher suite. It's the SSLSocket (or engine) that supports them. What it's looking for is a key, in the keystore, of a type suitable for one of its supported cipher suites. Typically, enabled cipher suites are RSA or DSS based, so it will look for an RSA or DSA key respectively.

In the following code:

KeyStore keyStore = KeyStore.getInstance(KeyStore.getDefaultType());
keyStore.load(getAssets().open("test.keystore"), "ssltest".toCharArray());

ServerSocketFactory socketFactory = SSLServerSocketFactory.getDefault();
mServerSocket = (SSLServerSocket) socketFactory.createServerSocket(8080);

You're not doing anything with your keyStore. You might as well not load it at all in this case (and you should always close the input stream you read from, by the way).

Here, you're still using the default SSLServerSocketFactory, which you haven't specifically configured (and for which there is no default keystore): this is why you get "Could not find any key store entries to support the enabled cipher suites": it can't find a suitable key store entry, because it can't even find the key store.

You would need to configure an SSLContext, initialise it with a KeyManager built from your keystore and then get a server socket factory from it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your explanation. Using SSLContext fixed the problem :) –  wurfkeks Apr 4 '12 at 12:17
    
Thanks a ton for this. I was getting all sorts of errors because I was trying to get an SSLServerSocketFactory out of an SSLContext which was only initialized with TrustManagers, not KeyManagers. Your explanation and code really helped, cheers :) –  Matt Lyons May 24 '12 at 6:14

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