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I have the following functor:

class ComparatorClass {
  public:
    bool operator () (SimulatedDiskFile * file_1, SimulatedDiskFile * file_2) {
      string file_1_name = file_1->getFileName();
      string file_2_name = file_2->getFileName();

      cout << file_1_name << " and " << file_2_name << ": ";

      if (file_1_name < file_2_name) {
        cout << "true" << endl;
        return true;
      }
      else {
        cout << "false" << endl;
        return false;
      }
    }
};

It is supposed to be a strict weak ordering, and it's this long (could be one line only) for debug purposes.

I'm using this functor as a comparator functor for a stl::set. Problem being, it only inserts the first element. By adding console output to the comparator function, I learned that it's actually comparing the file name to itself every time.

Other relevant lines are:

typedef set<SimulatedDiskFile *, ComparatorClass> FileSet;

and

// (FileSet files_;) <- SimulatedDisk private class member
void SimulatedDisk::addFile(SimulatedDiskFile * file) {
  files_.insert(file);
  positions_calculated_ = false;
}

EDIT: the code that calls .addFile() is:

current_request = all_requests.begin();
while (current_request != all_requests.end()) {
  SimulatedDiskFile temp_file(current_request->getFileName(), current_request->getResponseSize());
  disk.addFile(&temp_file);
  current_request++;
}

Where all_requests is a list, and class Request is such that:

class Request {
  private:
    string file_name_;
    int response_code_;
    int response_size_;

  public:
    void setFileName(string file_name);
    string getFileName();
    void setResponseCode(int response_code);
    int getResponseCode();
    void setResponseSize(int response_size);
    int getResponseSize();
};

I wish I could offer my hypotesis as to what's going on, but I actually have no idea. Thanks in advance for any pointers.

share|improve this question
    
If it looks like it's comparing the same filename each time then it's not going to insert any new members after the first as, to the set, each new file compares as neither 'less than' nor 'not greater than' the one file already in the set. Where are you getting the file pointer that you are passing into the addFile method from? –  Charles Bailey Jun 16 '09 at 12:14
    
What code is calling addFile? –  Patrick Jun 16 '09 at 12:15
    
Edited question to add these information pieces. –  Rafael Almeida Jun 16 '09 at 12:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's nothing wrong with the code you've posted, functionally speaking. Here's a complete test program - I've only filled in the blanks, not changing your code at all.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <set>

using namespace std;

class SimulatedDiskFile
{
public:
	string getFileName() { return name; }

	SimulatedDiskFile(const string &n)
		: name(n) { }

	string name;
};

class ComparatorClass {
  public:
	bool operator () (SimulatedDiskFile * file_1, SimulatedDiskFile * file_2) {
	  string file_1_name = file_1->getFileName();
	  string file_2_name = file_2->getFileName();

	  cout << file_1_name << " and " << file_2_name << ": ";

	  if (file_1_name < file_2_name) {
		cout << "true" << endl;
		return true;
	  }
	  else {
		cout << "false" << endl;
		return false;
	  }
	}
};

typedef set<SimulatedDiskFile *, ComparatorClass> FileSet;

int main()
{
	FileSet files;

	files.insert(new SimulatedDiskFile("a"));
	files.insert(new SimulatedDiskFile("z"));
	files.insert(new SimulatedDiskFile("m"));

	FileSet::iterator f;
	for (f = files.begin(); f != files.end(); f++)
		cout << (*f)->name << std::endl;

	return 0;
}

I get this output:

z and a: false
a and z: true
z and a: false
m and a: false
m and z: true
z and m: false
a and m: true
m and a: false
a
m
z

Note that the set ends up with all three things stored in it, and your comparison logging shows sensible behaviour.

Edit:

Your bug is in these line:

SimulatedDiskFile temp_file(current_request->getFileName(), current_request->getResponseSize());

disk.addFile(&temp_file);

You're taking the address of a local object. Each time around the loop that object is destroyed and the next object is allocated into exactly the same space. So only the final object still exists at the end of the loop and you've added multiple pointers to that same object. Outside the loop, all bets are off because now none of the objects exist.

Either allocate each SimulatedDiskFile with new (like in my test, but then you'll have to figure out when to delete them), or else don't use pointers at all (far easier if it fits the constraints of your problem).

share|improve this answer
    
Using the new operator actually solved it. In my naiveness I figured C++ garbage collector wouldn't delete the SDF block since it had a pointer to it (in the container). I'm using pointers exactly to fit a constraint, since I'll have to modify the objects based on the order they appear on the set. But deleting them afterwards will be not a problem. Thanks a lot! –  Rafael Almeida Jun 16 '09 at 12:31
    
You really need to read up on C++ memory management - there is no C++ garbage collector. –  anon Jun 16 '09 at 12:32
    
You're probably right, I'll get to it when I can! =) –  Rafael Almeida Jun 16 '09 at 12:37
    
Beware of naive descriptions, e.g. on this site. Go to a library and check out Stroustrup, Herb Sutter, Scott Meyers. –  Daniel Earwicker Jun 16 '09 at 12:59
    
Also ignore any book written before about '98. –  Daniel Earwicker Jun 16 '09 at 13:00

And here is the problem:

SimulatedDiskFile temp_file(current_request->getFileName(),
                                   current_request->getResponseSize());
disk.addFile(&temp_file);

You are adding a pointer to a variable which is immediately destroyed. You need to dynamically create your SDF objects.

share|improve this answer
urrent_request = all_requests.begin();
while (current_request != all_requests.end()) {
  SimulatedDiskFile temp_file(...blah..blah..); ====> pointer to local variable is inserted
  disk.addFile(&temp_file);
  current_request++;

}

temp_file would go out of scope the moment next iteration in while loop. You need to change the insert code. Create SimulatedDiskFile objects on heap and push otherwise if the objects are smaller then store by value in set.

share|improve this answer

Agree with @Earwicker. All looks good. Have you had a look inside all_requests? Maybe all the filenames are the same in there and everything else is working fine? (just thinking out loud here)

share|improve this answer

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