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I have a SQL Server table:

+----+-------------+-------------------+
| ID | CompanyID   | CompanyCode       |
+----+-------------+-------------------+
| 1  | 1           | AAAA-123          |
| 2  | 2           | BBBB-111          |
| 3  | 1           | AAAA-123          |
| 4  | 3           | CCCC-999          |
| 5  | 3           | CCCC-999          |
| 6  | 1           | AAAA-123          |
+----+-------------+-------------------+

The ID field is the PK.

The CompanyID and CompanyCode fields specify a unique company whereby a CompanyID will ALWAYS have the same CompanyCode (and vice versa) and no two Companies will ever have the same CompanyID and/or CompanyCode.

I would like to create a rule on the table that will never allow a record to be added to the table if/when a CompanyCode doesn't match an existing CompanyCode where the CompanyID's match.

The following is an example of what I cannot allow to occur on the table:

+----+-------------+-------------------+
| ID | CompanyID   | CompanyCode       |
+----+-------------+-------------------+
| 1  | 1           | AAAA-123          |
| 2  | 1           | BBBB-111          |<<<< This record should not be allowed
| 3  | 1           | AAAA-123          |
| 4  | 3           | CCCC-999          |
| 5  | 3           | CCCC-999          |
| 6  | 1           | AAAA-123          |
+----+-------------+-------------------+

Notice the record with ID=2, the CompanyCode BBBB-111 doesn't match the existing record that has a CompanyCode of AAAA-123.

I want this rule to exist on the table somehow - i.e. I don't want this rule to be a business rule that queries and/or stored procedures have to manage.

I suppose you can say I'm wanting to enforce duplicate records (on CompanyID and CompanyCode) if and only if an existing CompanyID and/or CompanyCode exists in the table.

Is this possible to do at the table design level? Or am I stuck with having to manage this in my scripts?

Update

Although this isn't really pertinent to my OP, from the feedback I received, I suppose I should give a little background on the CompanyID/CompanyCode table design.

First off, this is just a mock table design to try to explain my question - my real table has nothing to do with companies.

Second, my real table is a middle-man between two web-services where Service1 creates a DeviceID and Service2 collects a SerialNumber that exists in a micro-device. Also, my real table contains many other columns that this middle-man server has to process.

One of the strange things about this middle-man service is that the table that I'm talking about has to allow NULLS for both the DeviceID and SerialNumber - it all depends on which Service sent a record first.... I'm am talking too much and going way off topic of my original question, but I thought I had to clarify my table example since I was getting much flak in regards to my breaking normalization.

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3  
Why is CompanyCode here and not in Company table? –  Nikola Markovinović Apr 4 '12 at 12:45
4  
This is like one of the early examples you get shown when learning normalization - if CompanyCode depends on CompanyID (and vice versa, in this case), there should be a table somewhere that represents that fact once, then only one of these keys should appear in the above table. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 4 '12 at 12:56
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Okay, this isn't the prettiest of code, but it does enforce the constraint, I think. The trick is to create an indexed view with two unique indexes defined on it:

create table dbo.ABC (
    Col1 int not null,
    Col2 int not null
)
go
create view dbo.ABC_Col1_Col2_dep
with schemabinding
as
    select Col1,Col2,COUNT_BIG(*) as Cnt
    from
        dbo.ABC
    group by
        Col1,Col2
go
create unique clustered index IX_Col1_UniqueCol2 on dbo.ABC_Col1_Col2_dep (Col1)
go
create unique nonclustered index IX_Col2_UniqueCol1 on dbo.ABC_Col1_Col2_dep (Col2)
go

Now we insert some initial data:

insert into dbo.ABC (Col1,Col2)
select 1,3 union all
select 2,19 union all
select 3,12

We can add another row with exactly the same values for Col1 and Col2:

insert into dbo.ABC (Col1,Col2)
select 1,3

But if we pick a value for Col2 that has been used for another Col1, or vice versa, we get errors:

insert into dbo.ABC (Col1,Col2)
select 2,3
go
insert into dbo.ABC (Col1,Col2)
select 1,5

The trick here was to observe that this query:

    select Col1,Col2,COUNT_BIG(*) as Cnt
    from
        dbo.ABC
    group by
        Col1,Col2

will only have one row for a particular Col1 value, and only one row with a particular Col2 value, provided that the constraint you're seeking to enforce has not been broken - but as soon as a non-matching row is inserted into the base table, this query returns multiple rows.

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 CREATE UNIQUE INDEX idx_name ON TableName(CompanyID, CompanyCode)

(assuming your table is named TableName).

However, you should be aware that this design violates the principle of database normalization. A properly normalized database would have a separate table with only CompanyID and CompanyName fields. You would then modify the table in your example to have only the CompanyID field; the CompanyCode would be "looked up" (using a VIEW) when needed.

This design has the following benefits:

  1. It becomes literally impossible to have the same company ID with different names.

  2. In the event a company changes its code, you only need to update one record in a single table which is error-proof and faster.

  3. You save on storage.

It has a minor disadvantage in that you have to join in the Company table to get the code. In relational databases that's not necessarily a real disadvantage (JOINing normalized data is what relational database are for), but you could eliminate even that by getting rid of CompanyID and using the code as the primary key for companies. I would only consider this if the code is immutable (it won't change over time for a given company).

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This will not work as a Unique Index will not allow multiple records to include the same CompanyID and CompanyCode. Notice how the example table in my OP includes more than one record with duplicate ID/Code. –  Jed Apr 4 '12 at 13:26
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I would suggest that you NOT store CompanyID and CompanyCode in the table. Instead, you should have another table that stores 1 row for each CompanyId and also has it's corresponding code. You can then set up a foreign key to makes sure the CompanyId in this table exists in the other table.

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I don't know about making a rule to enforce this, but you are using two seperate foreign keys for the same thing ( that will always match up)... it would be a better idea to not have company code in this table at all and join it on a different table when you need the data, or redesign it in some other way

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You are violating 3rd normal form. A non key is dependent on another non key. CompanyCode is dependent on CompanyID. The remedy as stated by others is to create a CompanyID, CompanyCode table where CompanyID is the PK. Remove CompanyCode from your table and create FK relationship on ComanyID that points to you new table. http://www.phlonx.com/resources/nf3/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_normal_form

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