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I have two tables, tbl_foo and tbl_bar, and I want to join these tables with tbl_foo.foo_id = tbl_bar.foo_id in the on-clause. However, for each tbl_bar.baz_id there should be one row for each tbl_foo.foo_id (even if no such entry in tbl_bar exists). How do I write such query?

There's more info on the schema and my desired result below.

  • Edit: Each row must have a foo_id and baz_id.
  • Edit 2: Added tbl_baz below.

Desired result

+--------+--------+--------+------------+
| bar_id | baz_id | foo_id | some_field |
+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|      1 |    101 |      1 | foo        |
|      2 |    101 |      2 | bar        |
|      3 |    101 |      3 | baz        |
|   NULL |    101 |      4 | bin        |
|      4 |    102 |      1 | foo        |
|   NULL |    102 |      2 | bar        |
|      5 |    102 |      3 | baz        |
|   NULL |    102 |      4 | bin        |
+--------+--------+--------+------------+

Table: tbl_foo

+--------+------------+
| foo_id | some_field |
+--------+------------+
|      1 | foo        |
|      2 | bar        |
|      3 | baz        |
|      4 | bin        |
+--------+------------+

Table: tbl_bar

+--------+--------+--------+
| bar_id | baz_id | foo_id |
+--------+--------+--------+
|      1 |    101 |      1 |
|      2 |    101 |      2 |
|      3 |    101 |      3 |
|      4 |    102 |      1 |
|      5 |    102 |      3 |
+--------+--------+--------+

Table: tbl_baz

+--------+
| baz_id |
+--------+
|    101 |
|    102 |
+--------+

SQL Schema

CREATE TABLE tbl_foo (
    foo_id INT,
    some_field VARCHAR(255),
    PRIMARY KEY (foo_id)
);

INSERT INTO tbl_foo VALUES
(1, 'foo'),
(2, 'bar'),
(3, 'baz'),
(4, 'bin');

CREATE TABLE tbl_bar (
    bar_id INT,
    baz_id INT,
    foo_id INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (bar_id, baz_id),
    FOREIGN KEY (baz_id) REFERENCES tbl_baz (baz_id),
    FOREIGN KEY (foo_id) REFERENCES tbl_foo (foo_id)
);

INSERT INTO tbl_bar VALUES
(1, 101, 1),
(2, 101, 2),
(3, 101, 3),
(4, 102, 1),
(5, 102, 3);

CREATE TABLE tbl_baz (
    baz_id INT,
    PRIMARY KEY (baz_id)
);

INSERT INTO tbl_baz VALUES
(101),
(102);
share|improve this question
    
Are you expecting a baz_id for every foo_id? Are you looking to then insert missing records into tbl_bar? –  Tim Lehner Apr 4 '12 at 13:39
    
@TimLehner Yes and no. I simply need the data for my application to process –  Vague Apr 4 '12 at 14:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may be looking for a query like this:

UPDATE

Based upon new tbl_baz:

select y.bar_id, x.baz_id, x.foo_id, x.some_field
from (
    select a.foo_id, a.some_field, b.baz_id
    -- Cross foo_id with all baz_id
    from tbl_foo as a, tbl_baz as b
) as x
    -- Get the bar_id where it exists for each foo_id/baz_id combo
    left join tbl_bar as y on x.foo_id = y.foo_id
        and x.baz_id = y.baz_id
order by x.baz_id, x.foo_id

This is based on the assumption that you want to see each foo_id for each baz_id regardless of what is in your many-to-many table.

EXAMPLE of why you may not want this, or may want to update your many-to-many table instead:

If we replace "foo" and "baz" with "person" and "car", this query is essentially saying that every person owns every car. This may be the case, but it is certainly not represented in the "ownership" many-to-many table (bar).

share|improve this answer
    
What's wrong with your earlier CROSS JOIN version? –  Vague Apr 4 '12 at 14:49
    
I don't know, did it work? I'm lost on the MySql cross-join syntax (MySql really sees that as inner-join?). This is more correct either way if a particular baz is not in the bar table. –  Tim Lehner Apr 4 '12 at 14:54
    
Both of your versions seem to work. Thanks. You're right in your example, and I'll look into a way to keep the many-to-many table complete –  Vague Apr 4 '12 at 15:36
    
Interesting. It's probably better to pull the values from the baz table directly as in the new version of the query, especially considering the seeming incompleteness of bar. –  Tim Lehner Apr 4 '12 at 15:41

Like mwigdalh said, there's no way to achieve that output with the given tables. If there was another baz table, there would be a way. The problem is that the highlighted records below are essentially pulled from thin air, and meaningless. You could just as easily put "meh" in each one, and the output would make as much sense.

+--------+--------+--------+------------+
| bar_id | baz_id | foo_id | some_field |
+--------+--------+--------+------------+
|      1 |    101 |      1 | foo        |
|      2 |    101 |      2 | bar        |
|      3 |    101 |      3 | baz        |
|   NULL |   *101*|      4 | bin        |
|      4 |    102 |      1 | foo        |
|   NULL |   *102*|      2 | bar        |
|      5 |    102 |      3 | baz        |
|   NULL |   *102*|      4 | bin        |
+--------+--------+--------+------------+

If you provide some context in a closer-to-real-world example, it might be found that there's a different output altogether that achieves your desired result.

share|improve this answer
    
There is actually a baz table, and baz_id should be a foreign key. I'll update the SQL schema in my question. –  Vague Apr 4 '12 at 14:04
    
And you're correct about the highlighted lines. I do however need this data. Do you suggest that I should pull them from thin air in my application instead? –  Vague Apr 4 '12 at 14:15
2  
When I hear that something is pulled out of thin air, but also that you "do however need this data", that doesn't pass the smell test. You could pull them out of thin air anywhere you like, but like I said, you may as well hardcode them in your app to "meh" and get the same result. If you're dealing with some legacy system that absolutely won't accept NULL for a baz_id, then just put COALESCE(baz_id,-1) AS baz_id in your SELECT statement. But I'd be wary that this might be papering over some cracks that will cause a lot more damage in the long run. –  mo. Apr 4 '12 at 14:52

Vague, you can't get there from here. You're asking for a result that specifies a baz_id for rows where there is no corresponding row from tbl_bar. There is simply no way to construct the missing data in this case.

Either your schema is not correct or you need some custom default logic for cases where you can't find a row in tbl_bar.

share|improve this answer
    
Not possible with this set of data. –  Virus Apr 4 '12 at 13:30
    
Thanks for your input, but I think @TimLehner is on to something which makes it seem possible. –  Vague Apr 4 '12 at 14:10
    
If his assumption (that you want each foo_id for every baz_id) is true, then his query should work (once it's translated to MySql). –  mwigdahl Apr 4 '12 at 14:19

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