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I'm building a set of arrays where each element depends on the previous element, and I'm having a hard time coming up with an elegant solution for setting the initial value. The code looks something like this:

int A[1024];
int B[1024];
/* ... more arrays... */
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 1024; i++) {
    /* do some work */
    A[i] = A[i-1] + some_value();
    B[i] = B[i-1] + some_other_value();
    /* ... and so on... */
}

But of course this is an invalid memory access when i is 0. I know that the initial values of all arrays should be 0.

There are several ways to solve this problem. I could put a giant if statement in the loop to check if i is 0. Seems clunky since it will only evaluate to true once. I could keep a temporary variable, initialized to 0, for each array, called prev_val_of_A, etc, that holds the value of the last iteration. I'd have to update it to the current value at the end of every iteration. This seems a little silly since, most of the time, the value I want is sitting right there in the array's previous element. I could fiddle with the meaning of the array, and adopt the convention that the second element in the array contains the value for the first iteration of the loop; that is, allocate for A[1025], initialize A[0], then in the loop, do

A[i+1] = A[i] + some_value();

This seems confusing and might invite errors on further use of A.

I'm looking for clean, elegant suggestions to solve this issue.

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3 Answers 3

The easiest way to solve this is to initialise A[0], B[0] etc and then start the loop from i = 1. i.e.

int A[1024];
int B[1024];
/* ... more arrays... */
int i;

A[0] = stuff();
B[0] = other_stuff();
/* etc */

for (i = 1; i < 1024; i++) {
    /* do some work */
    A[i] = A[i-1] + some_value();
    B[i] = B[i-1] + some_other_value();
    /* ... and so on... */
}

EDIT: And this is reasonably elegent, as it mirrors the mathematics: sequences are often defined by f(0) = x, f(n) = <stuff with f(n-1)> if n > 0)

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I agree this would be best if I could make it work. It is certainly the most natural (and I should have mentioned it in the question). The problem is that /* do some work */ needs to occur for i=0, too. Perhaps I need to rethink the loop. –  Sam Britt Apr 4 '12 at 15:21

What about the following:

int AX[1024+1];
int BX[1024+1];
int *A = AX+1, *B = BX+1;
AX[0] = 0;
BX[0] = 0;

/* ... more arrays... */
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 1024; i++) {
    /* do some work */
    A[i] = A[i-1] + some_value();
    B[i] = B[i-1] + some_other_value();
    /* ... and so on... */
}
share|improve this answer
    
nevermind.. you added even more obscurity to a simple problem but it is correct –  UmNyobe Apr 4 '12 at 13:49
    
@UmNyobe: No, it's i=0. And AX has 1024 values plus a start value at the beginning. So Sams algorithms looks unchanged but has initialized values for the calculation of A[0], B[0], ... . –  ur. Apr 4 '12 at 13:51
    
yeah I noticed... but it is neither elegant nor clean... –  UmNyobe Apr 4 '12 at 13:53

Conceptually, your array is defined as an initial value and a reccurence relation. So just initialize your first element outside the loop, and then compute the next values with a loop. I don't see why it will not be pretty.

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Agreed, but see my comment to dbaupp's answer. –  Sam Britt Apr 4 '12 at 15:33

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