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Sample input string:

char *str = "12345.567675";

And the desired output if I need the precision of 3 places after decimal point:

str = "12345.568";

Is there a way to do this without converting the string to double and back to string?

share|improve this question
    
you want the rounding too?? – UmNyobe Apr 4 '12 at 13:59
    
Of course he wants, that's obvious even without the example... – Griwes Apr 4 '12 at 14:03
    
@UmNyobe yes rounding as well. – user1313016 Apr 4 '12 at 14:05
    
Converting makes this so much easier. By is this not wanted? – RvdK Apr 4 '12 at 14:06
    
If you want rounding, you will need to have some sort of numerics involved, and I bet atof plus other library functions will be faster than you, especially considering something like 0.9999 where you want to get 1.000, so the problem is not even localized around the decimal point. Is it a homework?? – eudoxos Apr 4 '12 at 14:50

yeah, on high level:
1. search '.' in the string.
2. if the position of '.' + 3 is smaller than the length you done.
3. otherwise, concat the string in the position of '.' + 3.
4. here is tricky: you need to check the next char if exists, ('.' + 4), and if it's value >= 5 goto 4.1 (otherwise goto 5)
4.1. copy the string to a new string that have one more space on the left (cause 9.9999 will be changed to 10.0000 in the '4' loop) and set a pointer (P) to the last char in that string.
4.2. if *P between 0 to 8 add 1 to it and go to 5.
4.3. if *P is 9, set it to zero, move the pointer one left (-1) and goto 4.2
4.4. if *P is '.', move the pointer one left (-1) and goto 4.2
5. remove all the 0 on the right of the decimal point (and the decimal point it self if needed) and you done!!!
6. delete everything, and use the double conversion method...

share|improve this answer
    
This will not round the resulting string properly, e.g. 0.9999, rounding at third digit should give 1.000 – user677656 Apr 4 '12 at 14:15
    
it will, read bolt number 4: ...which can cause in some scenario to go from right to left over your number and add 1 to each char. – Roee Gavirel Apr 4 '12 at 14:21
1  
saying is one thing, doing is another – user677656 Apr 4 '12 at 14:24
1  
@g241 *p += 1, then proceed to step 5. – Mooing Duck Apr 4 '12 at 21:45
1  
@g24l: sue me, I got the capitalization wrong. The point is that this answer is perfectly valid, and is what I would go with. – Mooing Duck Apr 9 '12 at 14:36

You can do this using a recursion.

void roundstr(std::string& strp) {
    char clast;
    char nlast;
    int sl(strp.length()), ipos(0);

    if (strp[sl - 1] == '.') { // skip the dot
        strp.erase(strp.end() - 1);
        nlast='.';
        roundstr(strp);
        return;
    }

    if (strp[sl - 2] == '.') { // handle dot is next char
        ipos = 1;
    }

    if (sl == 1) { // handle first char
        nlast = '0'; // virtual 0 in front of first char
        clast = strp[1];
    } else {
        clast = strp[sl - 1]; // current (last) char
        nlast = strp[sl - 2 - ipos]; // next to last char
    }

    if (clast >= '5') { // need to operate only if meet 5 or larger, otherwise stop
        nlast++;
        strp.erase(strp.end() - 1); // remove the last char from the string
        if (nlast == ':') { // if need to round further
            strp.replace(strp.end() - 1 - ipos, strp.end() - ipos, 1, nlast);
            clast = '0'; // keep current char value
            roundstr(strp);
        } else {
            strp.replace(strp.end() - 1 - ipos, strp.end() - ipos, 1, nlast);
            if(clast==':') clast = '0';
        }
    }

    sl = strp.length();
    if (nlast == ':') {
        if (ipos == 1) {
            strp += '.';
        } else {
            strp += '0';
        }
    } else if (nlast=='.' && strp[sl-1] != '.') {
        strp += '.';
    } else {
        if (ipos == 1 && strp[sl-1]!='.') {
            strp += '.';
        } else {
            strp += clast;
        }
    }

    return;
}

and you call it like this:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <stdlib.h>

void roundstr(std::string&);
int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    int p;
    std::string strp;

    switch (argc) {
    case 2:
        p = 2;
        break;
    case 3:
        p = atoi(argv[2]);
        strp = argv[1];
        break;
    default:
        return 1;
        break;
    }

    std::cout << strp << " " << p << std::endl;
    roundstr(strp);
    strp.erase(strp.end()-p, strp.end());
    std::cout << strp << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

as you can see you must handle removing the extra digits but it is not difficult to write a wrapper function, or even a class to do this automagicaly during construction.

It may also be possible that this will be faster if done with c-strings instead of std::string. In case that you plan to do heavy duty symbolic arithmetic I would advise for replacing all std::string and char with char * but you should be more careful during removal addition of values.

share|improve this answer

Find the dot in the string. Then, find the fourth character after that position. Return substring from 0 to position of dot + 3, and then adjust the last character - if fourth character after dot in original string is greater than or equal to 5, then increment the last character (or set to '0', if '9' and increment the prievous and so on). If it's less than 5 - do nothing and return just substring of original string.

Although, I think it wouldn't hit the performance if you just converted it to float, use (for example) boost::format to get it rounded.

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget the carry, and the possible requirement of adding a digit to the left. – Mooing Duck Apr 4 '12 at 21:42

This casts it to a float first.

int main()
{
    std::string f = "12345.567675";

    std::ostringstream ss;
    float x = boost::lexical_cast<float>(f);
    ss << std::fixed << std::setprecision(3);
    ss << x;
    std::string s = ss.str();

    std::cout << s << "\n";

    return 0;
}

Here are the results:

./a.out 
12345.567
share|improve this answer
1  
aren't you converting this back to string from a numeric? what is this? playing with words...it's not tomato, it's a tomAtO ...? – user677656 Apr 4 '12 at 14:18
    
did you read the question ? 'without converting the string to double and back to string' – Roee Gavirel Apr 4 '12 at 14:24
    
@RoeeGavirel - Yes, but I missed that part. – 01100110 Apr 4 '12 at 14:27

Assuming that you always have a dot and at least 3 digits after it:

char *str = "12345.567675";
char *p = str;

while ( *p != '.' )
{
    printf( "%c", *p++ );
    // find a dot
}

for ( int i = 0; i < 4; i++ )
{
    printf( "%c", *p++ );
}
share|improve this answer
3  
So many bad things... A. don't assume it have '.' B. Don't assume it have 3 digit after it C. what about rounding the number... – Roee Gavirel Apr 4 '12 at 14:23

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