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I understand you need a special ID to deploy your developed app to an iPad, even your local one plugged into your dev-machine. Correct? What exactly is locked down - you can't simply copy the compiled app onto a device manually or anything?

I've heard you can get around this by jailbreaking the device, but how does this work? Is it much more convoluted or once jail-broken can you deploy to your test device in the same way you would un-jailbroken with an ID?

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You can write some code that will run on your jailbroken iPad, but it'll never get seen by most people. In order to get your app really out there, you'll need it in the App Store -- and in order to get it into the App Store, you'll need (1) an account and (2) for the app to be vetted by Apple. –  cHao Apr 4 '12 at 14:06
    
This is only for local development and testing - I wish to experiment developing for iPad before deciding if I want to create and release apps for real. –  John Apr 4 '12 at 15:05

3 Answers 3

I understand you need a special ID to deploy your developed app to an iPad, even your local one plugged into your dev-machine. Correct?

Correct.

What exactly is locked down - you can't simply copy the compiled app onto a device manually or anything?

A non-jailbroken iPad will only run apps with a valid code signature. You need a certificate to make one of those, and Apple will only issue a certificate to people in the dev programme.

I've heard you can get around this by jailbreaking the device, but how does this work? Is it much more convoluted or once jail-broken can you deploy to your test device in the same way you would un-jailbroken with an ID?

I don't know the details of deploying apps on a jailbroken device, but I doubt it'll be as easy as joining the programme: to run stuff on my own device, I just click a button in Xcode. With a jailbroken device, you'd have to build the app, then separately get it on to the device somehow.

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Since jailbreaking has been around since the first iPhone, the process has become more and more straightforward and easy for the user. This should help you with the actual jailbreaking, and this should help with adding apps. I imagine uploading apps on an iPad wouldn't be too far off from iPhones, but the one thing that's definitely the case is jailbreaking will void your warranty, so back up your data in case you need to run a factory reset to remove any traces of past jailbreaking.

Long story short, it's easier to develop apps legitimately by paying for a developer account, but if you're short on cash or just making apps as a hobby, jailbreaking is a valid (and fun) option.

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Yes that's basically it - I want to play before committing to pay. $99 isn't much (in the west anyway) but I kind of object having to pay just for hobby development. –  John Apr 4 '12 at 15:08
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Don't forget you can always use the iOS simulator for free, so you can have a go programming before you make the decision. –  Amy Worrall Apr 4 '12 at 16:13

There are two ways to distribute an application for iOS. Apple's approved method which is through the iTunes App Store, and through the jailbroken world.

Jailbreaking isn't supported by Apple and as a result you're pretty much on your own for the dependency and community that it won't break.

For the supported manner, You can develop an app for iOS and test it in the Simulator. To be able to test it on a device you need an acct in the dev program which enables you to make a certificate profile for the device that you can pair between apps and devices.

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