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Does Ninject have an attribute which I could use to decorate class or constructor to let Ninject to ignore it?

I need to get rid of:

A cyclical dependency was detected between the constructors of two services.

This is my code:

// Abstraction
public interface ICommandHandler<TCommand>
{
    void Handle(TCommand command);
}

// Implementation
public class ShipOrderCommandHandler 
    : ICommandHandler<ShipOrderCommand>
{
    private readonly IRepository<Order> repository;

    public ShipOrderCommandHandler(
        IRepository<Order> repository)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
    }

    public void Handle(ShipOrderCommand command)
    {
        // do some useful stuf with the command and repository.
    }
}

My generic decorator:

public TransactionalCommandHandlerDecorator<TCommand>
    : ICommandHandler<TCommand>
{
    private ICommandHandler<TCommand> decoratedHandler;

    public TransactionalCommandHandlerDecorator(
        ICommandHandler<TCommand> decoratedHandler)
    {
        this.decoratedHandler = decoratedHandler;
    }

    public void Handle(TCommand command)
    {
        using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
        {
            this.decoratedHandler.Handle(command);
            scope.Complete();
        }
    }
}

My container registration:

kernel.Bind(typeof(ICommandHandler<>))
    .To(typeof(TransactionCommandHandlerDecora‌​tor<>));
share|improve this question
1  
You could use With.Interception as a way to accomplish the same effect but obv the decorator route is a very valid way to do it. –  Ruben Bartelink Apr 4 '12 at 19:46
    
I have read the whole Ninject Wiki and do not find how to ignore constructor. With. is good solution but not optimal I will need to place it in every Controller Constructor, it would be more rational to put Ignore on constructor which cause the problem. –  Tomas Apr 5 '12 at 6:14

2 Answers 2

Here's a working example based on your code.

public class AutoDecorationFacts
{
    readonly StandardKernel _kernel = new StandardKernel();

    public AutoDecorationFacts()
    {
        _kernel.Bind( typeof( ICommandHandler<> ) )
            .To( typeof( TransactionalCommandHandlerDecorator<> ) )
            .Named( "decorated" );
    }

    [Fact]
    public void RawBind()
    {
        _kernel.Bind( typeof( ICommandHandler<> ) ).To<ShipOrderCommandHandler>().WhenAnyAnchestorNamed( "decorated" );
        VerifyBoundRight();
    }

    void VerifyBoundRight()
    {
        var cmd = _kernel.Get<ICommandHandler<ShipOrderCommand>>();
        Assert.IsType<TransactionalCommandHandlerDecorator<ShipOrderCommand>>( cmd );
    }

Best used with Ninject.Extensions.Conventions:-

    [Fact]
    public void NameSpaceBasedConvention()
    {
        _kernel.Bind( scan => scan
            .FromThisAssembly()
            .SelectAllClasses()
            .InNamespaceOf<CommandHandlers.ShipOrderCommandHandler>()
            .BindAllInterfaces()
            .Configure( x => x.WhenAnyAnchestorNamed( "decorated" ) ) );
        VerifyBoundRight();
    }

    [Fact]
    public void UnconstrainedWorksTooButDontDoThat()
    {
        _kernel.Bind( scan => scan
            .FromThisAssembly()
            .SelectAllClasses()
            .BindAllInterfaces(  )
            .Configure( x=>x.WhenAnyAnchestorNamed("decorated" )));
        VerifyBoundRight();
    }
}

Your classes:

public class ShipOrderCommand { }

// Abstraction
public interface ICommandHandler<TCommand>
{
    void Handle( TCommand command );
}

// Implementation
namespace CommandHandlers
{
    public class ShipOrderCommandHandler
        : ICommandHandler<ShipOrderCommand>
    {
        public ShipOrderCommandHandler(
            )
        {
        }

        public void Handle( ShipOrderCommand command )
        {
            // do some useful stuf with the command and repository.
        }
    }
}
public class TransactionalCommandHandlerDecorator<TCommand>
    : ICommandHandler<TCommand>
{
    private ICommandHandler<TCommand> decoratedHandler;

    public TransactionalCommandHandlerDecorator(
        ICommandHandler<TCommand> decoratedHandler )
    {
        this.decoratedHandler = decoratedHandler;
    }

    public void Handle( TCommand command )
    {
        this.decoratedHandler.Handle( command );
    }
}

(used NuGet-latest versions of Ninject and Ninject.Extensions.Conventions)

share|improve this answer
    
How would one add another decorator on top of the transactional decorator (i.e. ExecutionTimeCommandHandlerDecorator)? –  Discofunk Jul 11 '13 at 3:27
    
@Discofunk See github.com/ninject/ninject/wiki/Contextual-Binding In general, one uses WhenInjectedInto and friends (the .Named trick above is as you point out not compositional and to be honest looking at it, I wonder who wrote it!) –  Ruben Bartelink Jul 11 '13 at 10:10

You should be able to use Contextual Binding to Bind the raw interfaces with a constraint to make them only be considered in the right context (i.e., when they're going into a decorator).

I have a very similar such When extension one I can paste here tomorrow if you're still looking then.

EDIT: The code I had in mind (turns out it doesnt do want you want directly)

public static class NinjectWhenExtensions
{
    public static void WhenRootRequestIsFor<T>( this IBindingSyntax that )
    {
        that.BindingConfiguration.Condition = request => request.RootRequestIsFor<T>();
    }
}

public static class NinjectRequestExtensions
{
    public static bool RootRequestIsFor<T>( this IRequest request )
    {
#if false
        // Need to use ContextPreservingGet in factories and nested requests for this to work.
        // http://www.planetgeek.ch/2010/12/08/ninject-extension-contextpreservation-explained/
        return RootRequest( request ).Service == typeof( T );   
#else
        // Hack - check the template arg is the interface wer'e looking for rather than doing what the name of the method would actually suggest
        IRequest rootRequest = RootRequest( request );
        return rootRequest.Service.IsGenericType && rootRequest.Service.GetGenericArguments().Single() == typeof( T );
#endif
    }

    static IRequest RootRequest( IRequest request )
    {
        if ( request.ParentRequest == null )
            return request;

        return RootRequest( request.ParentRequest );
    }
}

Used to attach decorators:-

root.Bind<IEndpointSettings>().To<IAnonymousEndpointSettings>().WhenRootRequestIsFor<IAnonymousService>();
root.Bind<IEndpointSettings>().To<IAuthenticatedSettings>().WhenRootRequestIsFor<IServiceA>();

EDIT 2: You should be able to use create a When derivative which takes the general binding for IX out of the picture except when it's being Resolved to be fed into a Decorator. Then the Bind for your Decorator can either use Context Preservation (@Remo has an article on it) to ensure that gets into the context so your predicate can decide or you may be able to add metadata to the Request and have the When rely on that.

So, I'd: 1. read about Context Preservation 2. examine/dump the contents of the context on the request that comes into your When condition and determine how you can appropriately filter.

(And hope someone will come along with a canned one liner answer!)

The Context Preservation extension may have a part to play.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, please post the code. Thank you! –  Tomas Apr 5 '12 at 5:50
    
@Tomas updated. More to come later. –  Ruben Bartelink Apr 5 '12 at 7:51
    
@Tomas updated again. Sorry it isnt full working code with tests - aint got the time at the moment to do it, fun and all as it would be to work it out! –  Ruben Bartelink Apr 5 '12 at 9:01

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