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query: select id from users where id in (1,2,3,4,5)

If the users table contains ids 1, 2, 3, this would return 1, 2, and 3. I want a query that would return 4 and 5. In other words, I don't want the query to return any rows that exist in the table, I want to give it a list of numbers and get the values from that list that don't appear in the table.

(updated to clarify question following several inapplicable answers)

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How would you pick the id's for 1,2,3,4,5? is it a fixed number or 1 to max ID used? –  BugFinder Apr 4 '12 at 14:46
    
@BugFinder: that are fixed numbers. –  Dev Apr 4 '12 at 14:47
    
Am I missing something here? Your users table only contains id's 1,2 and 3 but you want to get id's 4 and 5? Where are id's 4 and 5? If they're not in the users table, you won't get anything whether you say select id from users where id in (4,5) or whatever other query you throw at it... –  DaveyBoy Apr 4 '12 at 14:51
    
So, what you want in this case is to get a list of the values missing from the table itself? ie if you're looking for 1,2,3,4 & 5 and the ones not on your table are 4 & 5, that's your expected result? –  DarkAjax Apr 4 '12 at 14:53
    
@darkajax: Where are id's 4 and 5? .. that exists in my list. I want to search my list and find out ids, which do not exist. 'yes' for your later comment. –  Dev Apr 4 '12 at 14:53

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Given the numbers are a fixed list. Quickest way I can think of is have a test table, populated with those numbers and do

untested select statement - but you will follow the princpal.

select test.number from test left join users on test.number = users.id where test.number<>users.id

Then you'll get back all the numbers that dont have a matching user.id and so can fill in the holes..

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answer by @safarov .... SELECT id FROM temp_ids WHERE temp_ids.id NOT IN (SELECT id FROM users) looks fine too. –  Dev Apr 4 '12 at 15:03
    
@BugFinder +1, finally you get question –  safarov Apr 4 '12 at 15:04
    
This is a good idea. It has the beneficial side effect that the range of possible IDs is stored in a table, rather than being hidden in a query somewhere in the code. –  octern Apr 4 '12 at 19:13

Write not in instead of in

select id from users where id not in (1,2,3,4,5)

If you want the opposite in list but not in table. Temp_ids is temp table consist of your id list

SELECT id FROM temp_ids WHERE temp_ids.id NOT IN (SELECT id FROM users)
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-1, Not correct, this will not return any result, but I need 4 and 5. where are in the list but not in id column of users table. –  Dev Apr 4 '12 at 14:44
    
table contains 3 records with ids: 1,2,3 –  Dev Apr 4 '12 at 14:46
    
The problem is dev is trying to find the numbers that are missing from a list, so wether the range was 1 to 5, or 1 to 1000, hes after a list of available numbers from the range that have not been allocated –  BugFinder Apr 4 '12 at 15:00

A different option is to use another table containing all possible ids and then do a select from there:

mysql> describe ids;
+-------+-----------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| Field | Type            | Null | Key | Default | Extra |
+-------+-----------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
| id    | int(5) unsigned | NO   |     | 0       |       |
+-------+-----------------+------+-----+---------+-------+
1 row in set (0.05 sec)

mysql> select * from ids;
+----+
| id |
+----+
|  1 |
|  2 |
|  3 |
|  4 |
|  5 |
+----+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> select * from users;
+----+
| id |
+----+
|  1 |
|  2 |
|  3 |
+----+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)


mysql> select id from ids where id not in (select id from users);
+----+
| id |
+----+
|  4 |
|  5 |
+----+
2 rows in set (0.04 sec)

Added side effect - allows you to expand the result list by inserting into the ids table

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Yep, that was my suggestion. –  BugFinder Apr 4 '12 at 15:03
    
@BugFinder - sorry - I'm a bit slow on he uptake today –  DaveyBoy Apr 4 '12 at 15:05
1  
Thats OK yours had pretty pictures :) –  BugFinder Apr 4 '12 at 15:36

The following query may be useful for you:-

select id from users where id in (4,5) and not in (1,2,3)

It will select users whose id is equal to 4 or 5 and exclude users of id 1,2,3

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This wont work because there is no id 4 or 5 used to return. The problem is dev is trying to find the numbers that are missing from a list, so wether the range was 1 to 5, or 1 to 1000, hes after a list of available numbers from the range that have not been allocated –  BugFinder Apr 4 '12 at 15:01
    
@dev, The question is highly non-understandable. It needs revision. –  Tabrez Ahmed Apr 4 '12 at 15:04

Had the same need and built on the answer by BugFinder using a temporary table in session. This way it will automatically be destroyed after I'm done with the query, so I don't have to deal with house cleaning as I will run this type of query often.

Create the temporary table:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE tmp_table (id INT UNSIGNED);

Populate tmp_table with the values you will check:

INSERT INTO tmp_table (id) values (1),(2),(3),(4),(5);

With the table created and populated, run the query as with any regular table:

SELECT tmp_table.id
  FROM tmp_table
  LEFT JOIN users u
  ON tmp_table.id = u.id
  WHERE u.id IS NULL;

This info on MySQL Temporary Tables was also useful

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If you don't want to (explicitly) use temporary tables, this will work:

SELECT id FROM (
  (SELECT 1 AS id) UNION ALL
  (SELECT 2 AS id) UNION ALL
  (SELECT 3 AS id) UNION ALL
  (SELECT 4 AS id) UNION ALL
  (SELECT 5 AS id)
) AS list
LEFT JOIN users USING (id)
WHERE users.id IS NULL

However, it is quite ugly, quite long, and I am dubious about how it would perform if the list of IDs is long.

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