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I'm trying to code an algorithm that will save to file as binary strings every integer in a range. Eg, for the range 0 to 7:

0 0 0
0 0 1
0 1 0
0 1 1
1 0 0
1 0 1
1 1 0
1 1 1

Note that the leading zeros and spaces between digits are essential.

What I cant figure out how to do in a simple way is to convert the integers to binary numbers represented by bool []s (or some alternate approach).

EDIT

As requested, my solution so far is:

const int NUM_INPUTS = 6;
bool digits[NUM_INPUTS] = {0};
int NUM_PATTERNS = pow(2, NUM_INPUTS);

for(int q = 0; q < NUM_PATTERNS; q++)
{
    for(int w = NUM_INPUTS -1 ; w > -1 ; w--)
    {

        if( ! ((q+1) % ( (int) pow(2, w)))  )
            digits[w] = !digits[w];

        outf << digits[w] << " ";
    }

    outf << "\n";
}

Unfortunately, this is a bit screwy as the first pattern it gives me is 000001 instead of 000000.

This is not homework. I'm just coding a simple algorithm to give me an input file for training a neural network.

share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? If so, tag it as such –  Shahbaz Apr 4 '12 at 15:01
    
I think you want to do some base conversion instead. Google C++ base 2 –  Blender Apr 4 '12 at 15:01
    
Binary data is not the same as an array of bools... are you supposed to create your own binary representation of numbers too? –  Lirik Apr 4 '12 at 15:02
1  
What have you tried so far? –  Mithrandir Apr 4 '12 at 15:02
    
@Mithrandir updated –  Matt Munson Apr 4 '12 at 15:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't use pow. Just use binary math:

const int NUM_INPUTS = 6;
int NUM_PATTERNS = 1 << NUM_INPUTS;

for(int q = 0; q < NUM_PATTERNS; q++)
{
    for(int w = NUM_INPUTS -1 ; w > -1; w--)
    {
        outf << ((q>>w) & 1) << " ";
    }
    outf << "\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
How does 1 << 6 = 64? I'm not familiar with the << or >> operators. –  Matt Munson Apr 4 '12 at 18:15
    
x << n shifts the value x to the left by n bits. If you prefer, it doubles the value x, n times. 1, in binary, is "0000_0001". 1 Shifted left 6 times is "0100_0000". In base 10, that is 64. Similarly x >> n shifts the value x to the right by n bits (or halves x, n times). en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation#Bit_shifts –  Robᵩ Apr 4 '12 at 18:46

Note: I'm not providing code, but merely a hint because the question sounds like homework

This is quite easy. See this example:

number = 23
binary representation = 10111
first  digit = (number   )&1 = 1
second digit = (number>>1)&1 = 1
third  digit = (number>>2)&1 = 1
fourth digit = (number>>3)&1 = 1
fifth  digit = (number>>4)&1 = 1

Alternatively written:

temp = number
for i from 0 to digits_count
    digit i = temp&1
    temp >>= 1

Note that the order of digits taken by this algorithm is the reverse of what you want to print.

share|improve this answer
    
int compare = 1L << (digits_count - 1); digit i = (temp & compare ? 1 : 0); temp <<= 1; –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 4 '12 at 15:10
    
In case you're wondering, that'll let you take the digits in the order you wanted... –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 4 '12 at 15:29
    
@OrgnlDave, I wasn't wondering, it was obvious. I only intend to give the OP a hint though, and let him tackle with the problem himself. –  Shahbaz Apr 4 '12 at 15:30

The lazy way would be to use std::bitset.

Example:

#include <bitset> 
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
  for (unsigned int i = 0; i != 8; ++i){
    std::bitset<3> b(i);
    std::cout << b << std::endl;
  }
}

If you want to output the bits individually, space-separated, replace std::cout << b << std::endl; with a call to something like Write(b), with Write defined as:

template<std::size_t S>
void Write(const std::bitset<S>& B)
{
  for (int i = S - 1; i >= 0; --i){
    std::cout << std::noboolalpha << B[i] << " ";
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
what is std::bitset? –  Matt Munson Apr 4 '12 at 18:54
    
@MattMunson: Now that I have access to a real computer with a real screen and a real keyboard, I added an example. –  Éric Malenfant Apr 4 '12 at 23:04

I guess , in this context , the problem is equivalent to converting a decimal into a binary. As a solution, base arithmetic method might be applied as well. And it seems you started to implement that method.

But this method can't be implemented just using mod (%) operation. Also division(/) operation must be used.

Thus , code would be as follows :

    int s = q;

    for(int w = NUM_INPUTS -1 ; w > -1 ; w--)  
    {
        (s / pow(2,w)) ? digits[w] = 1 : digits[w] = 0;
        s %= pow(2,w);

        outf << digits[w] << " ";
    }
share|improve this answer
    
May I ask the reason for downvote? –  user6994 Apr 4 '12 at 16:22
    
excessive use of needless arithmetic. a loop with a few bit shifts and compares is much easier, more appropriate, and clearer –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 4 '12 at 16:23
    
I agree with the ease of other method. But I wanted to approach the problem without interfering bitwise operations that are low level. Also, the way in the question tries to implement this arithmetical method. –  user6994 Apr 4 '12 at 16:30
    
shrug it wasn't me that down-voted you. and...let's be honest...we're talking about getting the bits out of an integer, 'low-level' bitwise operations are entirely more appropriate than floating-point library calls. IMO at least –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 4 '12 at 21:50

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