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I'm generating a file stream and wrapping it in a buffered stream reader. I am then consuming the stream a line at a time with read line. After X number of lines / bytes I hit the stack overflow exception. It doesn't seem to be an issue with recursively calling a method as it processes smaller files without issue. I'm hoping I just overlooked something simple here. There's to much logic to post the entire snippet here but this is the gist...

Instantiates a static stream reader //
{    
    using (FileStream fs = File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read,
    FileShare.Read))
    using (BufferedStream bs = new BufferedStream(fs))
    using (reader = new StreamReader(bs))

     InitializeRecord(reader) // passes reader in
}

InitializeRecord(StreamReader reader)
{  
    //Makes some determinations whether to take in the first line or skip to first    header record... This is working fine. Initializes first line = reader.ReadLine()
    // Calls the first method to generate the header output which in turns calls the LineReader Method to consume the next line.
}

LineReader()
{ // Main loop for iterating over lines where stackoverflow occurs
    while (!reader.EndOfStream)
    {
        string prev_line = line;
        line = reader.ReadLine(); // StackOverFlow occurs here only on larger files / # of bytes read        
        VerifyLine(line,prev_line);
    }
}

VerifyLine(string line)
{ 
    // Does some checking on the line and calls output methods for each record type which in turn calls LineReader which LineReader exits when the endofstream is reached. 
    //But is blowing up prior to reaching the end of the stream.  By writing the lines out to disk as it iterates it writes a replica of the stream perfectly until the stack overflow occurs. 
    //This is only the difference of anything greater than a 5 MB file. Some of these records are hitting 9 million characters. I tried increasing the buffer size without luck.
}
share|improve this question
    
You've not given us the lines which caused the problem. Somewhere inside InitializeRecord, LineReader, or VerifyLine exists your problem. – user7116 Apr 4 '12 at 15:09
    
I edited for LineReader method where the exception is being thrown. – user1135183 Apr 4 '12 at 15:15
    
what about 'VerifyLine' ? – Emanuele Greco Apr 4 '12 at 15:17
    
I'm not sure I can fit all of the code in here. It is a over 500 lines. The VerifyLine Method conditionally process the line passed in from the LineReader and calls out conditionally to four other methods which generate the variations of the output (header, detail, sub-trailer, and trailer). All of the line reading is occurring in the LineReader method which works fine and returns the expected results on smaller files under 5MB. But this is also where the error is occurring on larger files on line = reader.ReadLine in the LineReader method. – user1135183 Apr 4 '12 at 15:24
1  
If you run it under the debugger you will be able to inspect the stack trace when it crashes; it should show you where your unwanted recursion is coming from. – Matthew Watson Apr 4 '12 at 15:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It doesn't seem to be an issue with recursively calling a method as it processes smaller files without issue

But you are saying it blows up on larger files correct? For me, this sounds like there is a problem with your recursion. Is there anyway to perform your operations without recursion? I'd like to see more code in the verifyLine method.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I didn't have any infinite looping going on which is why I didn't think it was recursion. But based on a comment above I forgot about the call stack window in the debugger. It's running out of memory re-cursing through the methods prior to the endofstream being reached on larger files. – user1135183 Apr 4 '12 at 16:08

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