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I'm using javascript to bind to some checkboxes, and the toFixed(2) is not rounding up. Any ideas why it's not rounding? For instance, if the number is 859.385 it's only displaying 859.38 instead of 859.39.

I've also read that the toFixed can round differently depending on which browser you are using, anyone know of a way around this so that my javascript calculations match my php calculations?

var standardprice = parseFloat($('#hsprice_'+this.id.split('_')[1]).val());
var price =  parseFloat($('#hprice_'+this.id.split('_')[1]).val());
var discount =  parseFloat($('#hdiscount_'+this.id.split('_')[1]).val());
var deposit =  parseFloat($('#hdeposit_'+this.id.split('_')[1]).val());

var currSprice = parseFloat($('#hTotalSprice').val());
var currPrice = parseFloat($('#hTotalPrice').val());
var currDiscount = parseFloat($('#hTotalDiscount').val());
var currDeposit = parseFloat($('#hTotalDeposit').val());

currSprice += standardprice;
currPrice += price;
currDiscount += discount;
currDeposit += deposit;

$('#lblTotalSprice').text('$'+addCommas(currSprice.toFixed(2)));
$('#lblTotalPrice').text('$'+addCommas(currPrice.toFixed(2)));
$('#lblTotalDiscount').text('$'+addCommas(currDiscount.toFixed(2)));
$('#lblTotalDeposit').text('$'+addCommas(currDeposit.toFixed(2)));

$('#hTotalSprice').val(currSprice.toFixed(2));
$('#hTotalPrice').val(currPrice.toFixed(2));
$('#hTotalDiscount').val(currDiscount.toFixed(2));
$('#hTotalDeposit').val(currDeposit.toFixed(2));
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8 Answers

JavaScript's .toFixed() function is extremely buggy. It is very unpredictable with whether it rounds the results up or down.

Try running the following code in Chrome or Firefox:

( 0.035 ).toFixed( 2 ); // 0.04
( 0.045 ).toFixed( 2 ); // 0.04

It shows how unpredictable the .toFixed() method can be. I'd suggest writing your own method for this. The following should do what you want:

​function toFixed( number, precision ) {
    var multiplier = Math.pow( 10, precision );
    return Math.round( number * multiplier ) / multiplier;
}

Edit: TJ makes a very good point, so here's an updated version of this function.

function toFixed ( number, precision ) {
    var multiplier = Math.pow( 10, precision + 1 ),
        wholeNumber = Math.floor( number * multiplier );
    return Math.round( wholeNumber / 10 ) * 10 / multiplier;
}
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11  
It's not buggy. It's just how floating pointer numbers work, which might not be expected. –  user166390 May 26 '12 at 17:05
2  
Buggy might not be the best word, but it is unpredictable and inconsistent. In the past, I have tested this in different browsers and experienced different results. –  Robert Messerle Jul 3 '12 at 18:52
1  
To replicate toFixed completely, you may want to return the rounded value .toFixed(precision). Otherwise you don't get a string with a fixed number of decimals. –  Charles Jan 15 '13 at 2:31
    
I like this approach since rounding 5.5555 to 3 decimals with Math.round( num * 100 ) / 100).toFixed(dec) returns 5.560. Whereas the toFixed() function above more accurately returns 5.556 –  Justin Jul 22 '13 at 19:20
2  
Note that toFixed(35.855, 2) will give you "35.85", not "35.86", so this doesn't fix the OP's problem. (Astonishing, but true.) –  T.J. Crowder Nov 7 '13 at 7:59
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function roundup(num,dec){
    dec= dec || 0;
    var  s=String(num);
    if(num%1)s= s.replace(/5$/, '6');
    return Number((+s).toFixed(dec));
 }

 var n= 35.855
 roundup(n,2)

/* returned value: (Number) 35.86 */

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Try it with 35.855. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 7 '13 at 7:59
    
This is the only solution I've seen that will round predictably. –  Sean the Bean Nov 21 '13 at 15:18
    
The only problem is, it doesn't work if one of the decimals is 5 and the number of decimals to round to is higher than the position of that 5, e.g. roundup(70.5, 2). This could easily be improved by changing the regular expression in the replace statement, to something like: s.replace(/(\d{n})5/, '$16'), with n being equal to the dec paraemter. We only need to change the 5 in the n+1th position behind the decimal point, when rounding to n decimals, am I right? –  Mansiemans Feb 11 at 12:06
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You can use the Math.round() to round the number. If you want to round to a specific decimal point you can employ a little math:

var result=Math.round(original*100)/100
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1  
Note that this is unreliable. Try it with 35.855, for instance, and you'll end up with 35.85 (not 35.86). –  T.J. Crowder Nov 7 '13 at 7:58
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In Chrome, toFixed() rounds:

859.385 ==> 859.38
859.386 ==> 859.39

When I look at the ECMAScript 5th edition specification for .toFixed() (section 15.7.4.5), I do not see it explicitly describe rounding though it does describe something fairly obtusely that may be what Chrome has implemented.

It appears to me that if you want to control it with explicit rounding, then you should probably use the oft-suggested workaround of:

var roundedNum = (Math.round( num * 100 ) / 100).toFixed(2);

This will guarantee that you get predictable rounding like you are used to.

Working demo here: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/kvpgE/

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3  
It'll normally guarantee that you get predictable rounding. However, as mentioned in this answer the way javascript handles decimals can't really be trusted. Just try 35.855*100 in the Chrome console... I know, I was shocked too! This will mean that (Math.round( 35.855 * 100 ) / 100).toFixed(2) == 35.85 rather than 35.86. See that other answer for tips... –  mattbilson Aug 8 '13 at 15:33
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I stumbled upon this wondering why Number.toFixed was behaving strangely. I see that the native function is unreliable, which is unfortunate. Looking over the answers out of curiosity, I see most* of them don't behave properly with the number 35.855 as T.J. Crowder graciously commented on every one.

Maybe this will answer your question.

function toFixed(n,precision) {
    var match=RegExp("(\\d+\\.\\d{1,"+precision+"})(\\d)?").exec(n);
    if(match===null||match[2]===undefined) {
        return n.toFixed(precision);
        }
    if(match[2]>=5) {
        return (Number(match[1])+Math.pow(10,-precision)).toFixed(precision);
        }
    return match[1];
    }

The regex splits your number into an array of strings such as in toFixed(35.855,2): ["35.855", "35.85", "5"]. If the last number (after the precision cutoff) is >=5, add Math.pow(10, -precision) to the trimmed number. This will add .01 if you're cutting off at 2 decimals, .002 at 3, so on and so forth.

I don't know if this is foolproof, since it still performs decimal math on floats which can be unpredictable. I can say it rounds 35.855 up to 35.86.

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Use:

var result = Math.round( myNumber * 100 ) / 100;

For example:

$('#hTotalSprice').val(Math.round( currSprice * 100 ) / 100);

Or write your own function for doing that:

function roundMyNumber( num ) {
    return Math.round( num * 100 ) / 100;
}
$('#hTotalSprice').val( roundMyNumber( currSprice ) );
share|improve this answer
    
Note that this is unreliable. .val(roundMyNumber(35.855)) will put "35.85" (not "35.86") in the field. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 7 '13 at 7:56
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this might help

    tofix2Decimals=function(float){
        if(parseInt(float)==float)return float.toFixed(2);
        $decimals=/\.(\d+)/.exec(float)[1].length;
        $decimals=$decimals>=2?$decimals+1:3;
        float+=Math.pow(10,-$decimals);
        return float.toFixed(2);
    }
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An explanation might help. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 7 '13 at 8:01
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This happens due to JavaScript's Floating point representation.

Try this:

Number.prototype.round = function(digits) {
    digits = Math.floor(digits);
    if (isNaN(digits) || digits === 0) {
        return Math.round(this);
    }
    if (digits < 0 || digits > 16) {
        throw 'RangeError: Number.round() digits argument must be between 0 and 16';
    }
    var multiplicator = Math.pow(10, digits);
    return Math.round(this * multiplicator) / multiplicator;
}

Number.prototype.fixed = function(digits) {
    digits = Math.floor(digits);
    if (isNaN(digits) || digits === 0) {
        return Math.round(this).toString();
    }
    var parts = this.round(digits).toString().split('.');
    var fraction = parts.length === 1 ? '' : parts[1];
    if (digits > fraction.length) {
        fraction += new Array(digits - fraction.length + 1).join('0');
    }
    return parts[0] + '.' + fraction;
}

Usage:

var n = 859.385;
console.log(n.round(2)); // 859.39
console.log(n.fixed(2)); // 859.39
console.log(n.round(4)); // 859.385
console.log(n.fixed(4)); // 859.3850
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