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I want to have a 2x2 grid with a buttons inside. This is only ICS so I am trying to use the new GridLayout given.

Here's the XML of my layout:

 <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<GridLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:id="@+id/favorites_grid"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="match_parent"
    android:background="#00ff00"
    android:rowCount="2"
    android:columnCount="2">
  <Button
      android:text="Cell 0"
      android:layout_row="0"
      android:layout_column="0"
      android:textSize="14dip" />
  <Button
      android:text="Cell 1"
      android:layout_row="0"
      android:layout_column="1"
      android:textSize="14dip" />

  <Button
      android:text="Cell 2"
      android:layout_row="1"
      android:layout_column="0"
      android:textSize="14dip" />
  <Button
      android:text="Cell 3"
      android:layout_row="1"
      android:layout_column="1"
      android:textSize="14dip" />
</GridLayout>

The problem is that my views do not stretch evenly for each row. This causes a lot of extra space to the right of my GridLayout.

I tried setting layout_gravity="fill_horizontal" but that only applies to the last view on the row. This means Cell 1 stretches all the way to give enough space for Cell 0.

Thoughts on how to tackle this?

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Why didn't you set specific layout_width and layout_height sizes on these Button elements? –  Igor Ganapolsky Jan 14 at 17:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 25 down vote accepted

There are limitations when using the GridLayout, the following quote is taken from the documentation.

"GridLayout does not provide support for the principle of weight, as defined in weight. In general, it is not therefore possible to configure a GridLayout to distribute excess space in non-trivial proportions between multiple rows or columns ... For complete control over excess space distribution in a row or column; use a LinearLayout subview to hold the components in the associated cell group."

Here is a small example that uses LinearLayout subviews. (I used Space Views that takes up unused area and pushes the buttons into desired position.)

<GridLayout
    xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:layout_width="match_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:columnCount="1"
>
    <TextView
        android:text="2x2 button grid"
        android:textSize="32dip"
        android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal" />

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:orientation="horizontal">
        <Space
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_weight="1" />
        <Button
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:text="Button 1" />
        <Space
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_weight="1" />
        <Button
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_gravity="start"
            android:text="Button 2" />
        <Space
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_weight="1" />
    </LinearLayout>

    <LinearLayout
        android:layout_width="match_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:orientation="horizontal"
    >
        <Space
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_weight="1" />
        <Button
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:text="Button 3" />
        <Space
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_weight="1" />
        <Button
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="wrap_content"
            android:layout_gravity="start"
            android:text="Button 4" />
        <Space
            android:layout_width="wrap_content"
            android:layout_height="match_parent"
            android:layout_weight="1" />
    </LinearLayout>
</GridLayout>
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This looks like it works. I was trying to avoid that but I dont see another way of getting around this. I could probably write my own ViewGroup class that properly measures and layout its children. –  dnkoutso Apr 6 '12 at 15:25
15  
This GridLayout with a column of 1 is pretty much LinearLayout in vertical orientation. It makes the layout more complicated. GridLayout is supposed to simplify and take away nested layout. –  Win Myo Htet Nov 13 '12 at 2:15
3  
Just found a way! android:layout_gravity="fill_horizontal". In case you are using the Support Library, then change it to grid:layout_gravity="fill_horizontal" –  zubietaroberto Oct 1 '13 at 23:00
1  
I agree with Win Myo Htet. This seems to be the answer Android is suggesting, but I fail to see how it is an improvement over a LinearLayout. I thought the reason for GridLayout was to avoid nested LinearLayouts? Now I can't see a use case for GridLayout that makes sense. –  Mitch Nov 7 '13 at 23:09
    
@Mitch It seems the GridLayout plain isn't supposed to be used in this kind of instance. GridLayout, as far as I can tell from the docs, is supposed to help for much more complicated layouts. Imaging a layout where you want to have an small image in the top right corner, a main logo in the center and 3 text fields that should be aligned halfway between the left of the small image and the right of the center logo. GridLayout makes that simple. If you want 3 buttons evenly spaced horizontally, then LinearLayout is still the simplest. –  Rev Tyler Mar 19 at 20:00

You can set width of every child dynamically:

GridLayout.LayoutParams params = (GridLayout.LayoutParams) child.getLayoutParams();
    params.width = (parent.getWidth()/parent.getColumnCount()) -params.rightMargin - params.leftMargin;
    child.setLayoutParams(params);
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seems to break when useDefaultMargins="true" - works perfectly with them set to false –  Richard Le Mesurier Jul 29 at 13:27

I finally found the solution. As Rotemmiz said, you have to do it dynamically afterwards. This code stretches the buttons to fill the view horizontally, but the same can be done for vertically.

public void fillview(android.support.v7.widget.GridLayout gl)
{
    Button buttontemp;

    //Stretch buttons
    int idealChildWidth = (int) ((gl.getWidth()-20*gl.getColumnCount())/gl.getColumnCount());
    for( int i=0; i< gl.getChildCount();i++)
    {
        buttontemp = (Button) gl.getChildAt(i);
        buttontemp.setWidth(idealChildWidth);
    }
}

(The 20 is for the internal and external padding and margins. This could be done more universally, but this is far cleaner)

Then it can be called like this:

    android.support.v7.widget.GridLayout gl = (android.support.v7.widget.GridLayout)findViewById(R.id.buttongrid);
    ViewTreeObserver vto = gl.getViewTreeObserver();
    vto.addOnGlobalLayoutListener(new OnGlobalLayoutListener() {@Override public void onGlobalLayout() 
    {

            android.support.v7.widget.GridLayout gl = (android.support.v7.widget.GridLayout) findViewById(R.id.buttongrid);
            fillview(gl);

            ViewTreeObserver obs = gl.getViewTreeObserver();
            obs.removeGlobalOnLayoutListener(this);
    }});

It must be done with an observer because we need to wait for the view to be drawn before we call the views.

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Try adding the following to your GridLayout spec. That should work.

android:useDefaultMargins="true"

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I wanted to have a centered table with the labels right aligned and the values left aligned. The extra space should be around the table. After much experimenting and not following what the documentation said I should do, I came up with something that works. Here's what I did:

<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
xmlns:tools="http://schemas.android.com/tools"
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
android:layout_gravity="center_horizontal"
android:orientation="vertical" >

<GridLayout
    android:layout_width="wrap_content"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"
    android:columnCount="2"
    android:orientation="horizontal"
    android:useDefaultMargins="true" >

    <TextView
        android:layout_gravity="right"
        android:text="Short label:" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/start_time"
        android:layout_gravity="left"
        android:text="Long extended value" />

    <TextView
        android:layout_gravity="right"
        android:text="A very long extended label:" />

    <TextView
        android:id="@+id/elapsed_time"
        android:layout_gravity="left"
        android:text="Short value" />
</GridLayout>

This seems to work but the GridLayout shows the message:

"This GridLayout layout or its LinearLayout parent is useless"

Not sure why it is "useless" when it works for me.

I'm not sure why this works or if this is a good idea, but if you try it and can provide a better idea, small improvement or explain why it works (or won't work) I'd appreciate the feedback.

Thanks.

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This looks good in the layout editor, but fails when it runs. :-( –  Mitch Nov 11 '13 at 21:24
    
The "parent is useless" message is because you have a wrap_content inside a wrap_content and it is the only element in there as far as I can see. –  Ben Wilkinson Nov 21 '13 at 23:47

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