Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This seems like a pretty common question. Sadly I could not find it on SO. If this is a duplicate question; I apologize for that.

Say I have two integer arrays A and B:

A = [17, 3, 9, 11, 11, 15, 2]
B = [1, 13]

I need to return a true or a false if any element of array A is less than any element of array B.

The trivial way to do this was use 2 each loops (O(n^2) complexity)

def is_greater?(a,b)
  retVal = false
  b.each { |element|
    a.each { |value|
      if (value < element)
        retVal = true
        break
      end
    }
  }
  return retVal
end

is_greater?(A,B) => true

I also sorted out the elements in both the arrays and then used a single while loop to determine whether the element in A is less than that in B.

A.sort!
B.sort!
def is_greater?(a,b)
  retVal = false
  i = 0
  j = 0
  while (i < a.length && j < b.length)
    if (a[i] < b[j])
      retVal = true
      break
    elsif (a[i] == b[j])
      i = i + 1
      j = j + 1
    else
     j = j + 1
    end
  end
  return retVal
end

is_greater?(A,B) => true

I was wondering whether there is an efficient, precise way to do it in terms of lines of code. I was trying to figure out how to use the any? block, but it did not make any sense to me.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Yes, you can use Enumerable methods #any? and #min

For each item in a, return true if it is less than max:

max = b.max
a.any?{|x| x < max}  
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! i used this solution with the max value storing advice given by @TCopple –  chaitanya Apr 4 '12 at 18:45

It should be enough to just check the minimum of the first array against the maximum of the second.

a.min < b.max

The only way this conditional returns false is if every element is b is less than every element in a.

The complexity is O(m+n) which is the single iteration through both a and b.

share|improve this answer
    
atleast its linear rather than O(nlogn) and O(n^2) solutions which I proposed. Thanks for the max value caching tip –  chaitanya Apr 4 '12 at 18:44
    
It is actually O(2n) = O(n) (Product rule with constant) when m ~= n, not O(n logn). It is the same as the other solution. –  texasbruce Apr 4 '12 at 18:54
    
I like this one :) –  fl00r Apr 4 '12 at 19:22
    
@texasbruce I don't know if you're talking about my solution, but if you are I agree it reduces to the same complexity as the other answer. But.... m = len(a) and n = len(b), which is not O(2n) cause n can only represent the length of one array. –  TCopple Apr 4 '12 at 20:44
    
@texasbruce The O(n logn) was the complexity of the sorting solution which I gave, TCopple's solution has the complexity O(m+n).. essentially its linear –  chaitanya Apr 4 '12 at 20:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.