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I need to split a large (500 MB) text file (a log4net exception file) into manageable chunks like 100 5 MB files would be fine.

I would think this should be a walk in the park for PowerShell. How can I do it?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 25 down vote accepted

This is a somewhat easy task for PowerShell, complicated by the fact that the standard Get-Content cmdlet doesn't handle very large files too well. What I would suggest to do is use the .NET StreamReader class to read the file line by line in your PowerShell script and use the Add-Content cmdlet to write each line to a file with an ever-increasing index in the filename. Something like this:

$reader = new-object System.IO.StreamReader("C:\Exceptions.log")
$count = 1
$fileName = "{0}{1}.{2}" -f ($rootName, $count, $ext)
while(($line = $reader.ReadLine()) -ne $null)
{
    Add-Content -path $fileName -value $line
    if((Get-ChildItem -path $fileName).Length -ge $upperBound)
    {
        ++$count
        $fileName = "{0}{1}.{2}" -f ($rootName, $count, $ext)
    }
}

$reader.Close()
share|improve this answer
1  
This is exactly what I was looking for, and thanks for confirming my hunch that get-content is not great with large files. – Ralph Shillington Jun 16 '09 at 19:53
3  
Helpful tip: You can express numbers like this ... $upperBound = 5MB – Lee Jun 16 '09 at 20:02
3  
For those too lazy to read the next answer, you can set the $reader object via $reader = new-object System.IO.StreamReader($inputFile) – lmsurprenant Jul 14 '11 at 12:27
    
I'd suggest using a stringbuilder to concatenate individual lines before calling add-content to write content otherwise this approach is very slow. – Richard Dorman Mar 27 '14 at 13:41
    
@CVertex you do realize that your script reads the entire file into memory first? So that will never work for a truly huge file (multiple GBs). – thekip Nov 16 '15 at 16:59

A word of warning about some of the existing answers - they will run very slow for very big files. For a 1.6 GB log file I gave up after a couple of hours, realising it would not finish before I returned to work the next day.

Two issues: the call to Add-Content opens, seeks and then closes the current destination file for every line in the source file. Reading a little of the source file each time and looking for the new lines will also slows things down, but my guess is that Add-Content is the main culprit.

The following variant produces slightly less pleasant output: it will split files in the middle of lines, but it splits my 1.6 GB log in less than a minute:

$upperBound = 100MB


$fromFile = [io.file]::OpenRead($from)
$buff = new-object byte[] $upperBound
$count = $idx = 0
try {
    do {
        "Reading $upperBound"
        $count = $fromFile.Read($buff, 0, $buff.Length)
        if ($count -gt 0) {
            $to = "{0}.{1}.{2}" -f ($rootName, $idx, $ext)
            $toFile = [io.file]::OpenWrite($to)
            try {
                "Writing $count to $to"
                $tofile.Write($buff, 0, $count)
            } finally {
                $tofile.Close()
            }
        }
        $idx ++
    } while ($count -gt 0)
}
finally {
    $fromFile.Close()
}
share|improve this answer
2  
this approach worked well for me on a 6GB file that I needed to get split out in an emergency situation to more efficiently analyze in smaller chunks. thanks for posting! – xinunix Jun 15 '12 at 4:01
6  
It took me a couple of run-throughs to figure out how this script really works. I made a Gist of it, in case anyone's interested: gist.github.com/awayken/5861923 – awayken Jun 25 '13 at 20:14
1  
Is there any reason you didn't use StreamReader? So that you can split with new lines? – stej Nov 10 '14 at 7:49
1  
@stej based on this answer I added streamreader version in my answer as I needed it. – Vincent De Smet Feb 10 '15 at 13:12
1  
If you add these lines to the begging of the script to define the variables and modify them to suit the file you are trying to split, you'll be all set! $from = "C:\temp\large_log.txt" $rootName = "C:\temp\large_log_chunk" $ext = "txt" – Yves Rochon Dec 4 '15 at 13:59

I often need to do the same thing. The trick is getting the header repeated into each of the split chunks. I wrote the following cmdlet (PowerShell v2 CTP 3) and it does the trick.

##############################################################################
#.SYNOPSIS
# Breaks a text file into multiple text files in a destination, where each
# file contains a maximum number of lines.
#
#.DESCRIPTION
# When working with files that have a header, it is often desirable to have
# the header information repeated in all of the split files. Split-File
# supports this functionality with the -rc (RepeatCount) parameter.
#
#.PARAMETER Path
# Specifies the path to an item. Wildcards are permitted.
#
#.PARAMETER LiteralPath
# Specifies the path to an item. Unlike Path, the value of LiteralPath is
# used exactly as it is typed. No characters are interpreted as wildcards.
# If the path includes escape characters, enclose it in single quotation marks.
# Single quotation marks tell Windows PowerShell not to interpret any
# characters as escape sequences.
#
#.PARAMETER Destination
# (Or -d) The location in which to place the chunked output files.
#
#.PARAMETER Count
# (Or -c) The maximum number of lines in each file.
#
#.PARAMETER RepeatCount
# (Or -rc) Specifies the number of "header" lines from the input file that will
# be repeated in each output file. Typically this is 0 or 1 but it can be any
# number of lines.
#
#.EXAMPLE
# Split-File bigfile.csv 3000 -rc 1
#
#.LINK 
# Out-TempFile
##############################################################################
function Split-File {

    [CmdletBinding(DefaultParameterSetName='Path')]
    param(

        [Parameter(ParameterSetName='Path', Position=1, Mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipeline=$true, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [String[]]$Path,

        [Alias("PSPath")]
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName='LiteralPath', Mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [String[]]$LiteralPath,

        [Alias('c')]
        [Parameter(Position=2,Mandatory=$true)]
        [Int32]$Count,

        [Alias('d')]
        [Parameter(Position=3)]
        [String]$Destination='.',

        [Alias('rc')]
        [Parameter()]
        [Int32]$RepeatCount

    )

    process {

        # yeah! the cmdlet supports wildcards
        if ($LiteralPath) { $ResolveArgs = @{LiteralPath=$LiteralPath} }
        elseif ($Path) { $ResolveArgs = @{Path=$Path} }

        Resolve-Path @ResolveArgs | %{

            $InputName = [IO.Path]::GetFileNameWithoutExtension($_)
            $InputExt  = [IO.Path]::GetExtension($_)

            if ($RepeatCount) { $Header = Get-Content $_ -TotalCount:$RepeatCount }

            # get the input file in manageable chunks

            $Part = 1
            Get-Content $_ -ReadCount:$Count | %{

                # make an output filename with a suffix
                $OutputFile = Join-Path $Destination ('{0}-{1:0000}{2}' -f ($InputName,$Part,$InputExt))

                # In the first iteration the header will be
                # copied to the output file as usual
                # on subsequent iterations we have to do it
                if ($RepeatCount -and $Part -gt 1) {
                    Set-Content $OutputFile $Header
                }

                # write this chunk to the output file
                Write-Host "Writing $OutputFile"
                Add-Content $OutputFile $_

                $Part += 1

            }

        }

    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
works nicely. Might want to turn count into a long when you want to have more lines per file. Also, this script runs out of memory if you write huge files. – Wouter Sep 23 '13 at 11:49
    
+1 for supporting headers, my use case was CSV too. – Kasaku Jan 22 '14 at 11:06
    
Very handy for splitting a simple single-column text-file of server names into multiples for batch processing. – Signal15 Aug 27 '14 at 16:19

I found this question while trying to split multiple contacts in a single vCard VCF file to separate files. Here's what I did based on Lee's code. I had to look up how to create a new StreamReader object and changed null to $null.

$reader = new-object System.IO.StreamReader("C:\Contacts.vcf")
$count = 1
$filename = "C:\Contacts\{0}.vcf" -f ($count) 

while(($line = $reader.ReadLine()) -ne $null)
{
    Add-Content -path $fileName -value $line

    if($line -eq "END:VCARD")
    {
        ++$count
        $filename = "C:\Contacts\{0}.vcf" -f ($count)
    }
}

$reader.Close()
share|improve this answer

Same as all the answers here, but using StreamReader/StreamWriter to split on new lines (line by line, instead of trying to read the whole file into memory at once). This approach can split big files in the fastest way I know of.

Note: I do very little error checking, so I can't guarantee it'll work smoothly for your case. It did for mine (1.7 GB TXT file of 4 million lines split in 100,000 lines per file in 95 seconds).

#split test
$sw = new-object System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch
$sw.Start()
$filename = "C:\Users\Vincent\Desktop\test.txt"
$rootName = "C:\Users\Vincent\Desktop\result"
$ext = ".txt"

$linesperFile = 100000#100k
$filecount = 1
$reader = $null
try{
    $reader = [io.file]::OpenText($filename)
    try{
        "Creating file number $filecount"
        $writer = [io.file]::CreateText("{0}{1}.{2}" -f ($rootName,$filecount.ToString("000"),$ext))
        $filecount++
        $linecount = 0

        while($reader.EndOfStream -ne $true) {
            "Reading $linesperFile"
            while( ($linecount -lt $linesperFile) -and ($reader.EndOfStream -ne $true)){
                $writer.WriteLine($reader.ReadLine());
                $linecount++
            }

            if($reader.EndOfStream -ne $true) {
                "Closing file"
                $writer.Dispose();

                "Creating file number $filecount"
                $writer = [io.file]::CreateText("{0}{1}.{2}" -f ($rootName,$filecount.ToString("000"),$ext))
                $filecount++
                $linecount = 0
            }
        }
    } finally {
        $writer.Dispose();
    }
} finally {
    $reader.Dispose();
}
$sw.Stop()

Write-Host "Split complete in " $sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds "seconds"

Output splitting a 1.7 GB file:

...
Creating file number 45
Reading 100000
Closing file
Creating file number 46
Reading 100000
Closing file
Creating file number 47
Reading 100000
Closing file
Creating file number 48
Reading 100000
Split complete in  95.6308289 seconds
share|improve this answer

Simple one-liner to split based on number of lines (100 in this case):

$i=0; Get-Content .....log -ReadCount 100 | %{$i++; $_ | Out-File out_$i.txt}
share|improve this answer

Many of these answers were too slow for my source files. My source files were SQL files between 10 MB and 800 MB that needed to split into files of roughly equal line counts.

I found some of the previous answers which use Add-Content to be quite slow. Waiting many hours for a split to finish wasn't uncommon.

I didn't try Typhlosaurus's answer, but it looks to only do splits by file size, not line count.

The following has suited my purposes.

$sw = new-object System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch
$sw.Start()
Write-Host "Reading source file..."
$lines = [System.IO.File]::ReadAllLines("C:\Temp\SplitTest\source.sql")
$totalLines = $lines.Length

Write-Host "Total Lines :" $totalLines

$skip = 0
$count = 100000; # Number of lines per file

# File counter, with sort friendly name
$fileNumber = 1
$fileNumberString = $filenumber.ToString("000")

while ($skip -le $totalLines) {
    $upper = $skip + $count - 1
    if ($upper -gt ($lines.Length - 1)) {
        $upper = $lines.Length - 1
    }

    # Write the lines
    [System.IO.File]::WriteAllLines("C:\Temp\SplitTest\result$fileNumberString.txt",$lines[($skip..$upper)])

    # Increment counters
    $skip += $count
    $fileNumber++
    $fileNumberString = $filenumber.ToString("000")
}

$sw.Stop()

Write-Host "Split complete in " $sw.Elapsed.TotalSeconds "seconds"

For a 54 MB file, I get the output...

Reading source file...
Total Lines : 910030
Split complete in  1.7056578 seconds

I hope others looking for a simple, line-based splitting script that matches my requirements will find this useful.

share|improve this answer
    
But this will consume a lot of memory. I'm trying to re-write using streamreader/writer – Vincent De Smet Feb 10 '15 at 11:31
    
see my answer below for a memory friendly, new line based split – Vincent De Smet May 4 '15 at 16:09

I've made a little modification to split files based on size of each part.

##############################################################################
#.SYNOPSIS
# Breaks a text file into multiple text files in a destination, where each
# file contains a maximum number of lines.
#
#.DESCRIPTION
# When working with files that have a header, it is often desirable to have
# the header information repeated in all of the split files. Split-File
# supports this functionality with the -rc (RepeatCount) parameter.
#
#.PARAMETER Path
# Specifies the path to an item. Wildcards are permitted.
#
#.PARAMETER LiteralPath
# Specifies the path to an item. Unlike Path, the value of LiteralPath is
# used exactly as it is typed. No characters are interpreted as wildcards.
# If the path includes escape characters, enclose it in single quotation marks.
# Single quotation marks tell Windows PowerShell not to interpret any
# characters as escape sequences.
#
#.PARAMETER Destination
# (Or -d) The location in which to place the chunked output files.
#
#.PARAMETER Size
# (Or -s) The maximum size of each file. Size must be expressed in MB.
#
#.PARAMETER RepeatCount
# (Or -rc) Specifies the number of "header" lines from the input file that will
# be repeated in each output file. Typically this is 0 or 1 but it can be any
# number of lines.
#
#.EXAMPLE
# Split-File bigfile.csv -s 20 -rc 1
#
#.LINK 
# Out-TempFile
##############################################################################
function Split-File {

    [CmdletBinding(DefaultParameterSetName='Path')]
    param(

        [Parameter(ParameterSetName='Path', Position=1, Mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipeline=$true, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [String[]]$Path,

        [Alias("PSPath")]
        [Parameter(ParameterSetName='LiteralPath', Mandatory=$true, ValueFromPipelineByPropertyName=$true)]
        [String[]]$LiteralPath,

        [Alias('s')]
        [Parameter(Position=2,Mandatory=$true)]
        [Int32]$Size,

        [Alias('d')]
        [Parameter(Position=3)]
        [String]$Destination='.',

        [Alias('rc')]
        [Parameter()]
        [Int32]$RepeatCount

    )

    process {

  # yeah! the cmdlet supports wildcards
        if ($LiteralPath) { $ResolveArgs = @{LiteralPath=$LiteralPath} }
        elseif ($Path) { $ResolveArgs = @{Path=$Path} }

        Resolve-Path @ResolveArgs | %{

            $InputName = [IO.Path]::GetFileNameWithoutExtension($_)
            $InputExt  = [IO.Path]::GetExtension($_)

            if ($RepeatCount) { $Header = Get-Content $_ -TotalCount:$RepeatCount }

   Resolve-Path @ResolveArgs | %{

    $InputName = [IO.Path]::GetFileNameWithoutExtension($_)
    $InputExt  = [IO.Path]::GetExtension($_)

    if ($RepeatCount) { $Header = Get-Content $_ -TotalCount:$RepeatCount }

    # get the input file in manageable chunks

    $Part = 1
    $buffer = ""
    Get-Content $_ -ReadCount:1 | %{

     # make an output filename with a suffix
     $OutputFile = Join-Path $Destination ('{0}-{1:0000}{2}' -f ($InputName,$Part,$InputExt))

     # In the first iteration the header will be
     # copied to the output file as usual
     # on subsequent iterations we have to do it
     if ($RepeatCount -and $Part -gt 1) {
      Set-Content $OutputFile $Header
     }

     # test buffer size and dump data only if buffer is greater than size
     if ($buffer.length -gt ($Size * 1MB)) {
      # write this chunk to the output file
      Write-Host "Writing $OutputFile"
      Add-Content $OutputFile $buffer
      $Part += 1
      $buffer = ""
     } else {
      $buffer += $_ + "`r"
     }
    }
   }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

There's also this quick (and somewhat dirty) one-liner:

$linecount=0; $i=0; Get-Content .\BIG_LOG_FILE.txt | %{ Add-Content OUT$i.log "$_"; $linecount++; if ($linecount -eq 3000) {$I++; $linecount=0 } }

You can tweak the number of first lines per batch by changing the hard-coded 3000 value.

share|improve this answer

Do this:

FILE 1

There's also this quick (and somewhat dirty) one-liner:

$linecount=0; $i=0; Get-Content .\BIG_LOG_FILE.txt | %{ Add-Content OUT$i.log "$_"; $linecount++; if ($linecount -eq 3000) {$I++; $linecount=0 } }

You can tweak the number of first lines per batch by changing the hard-coded 3000 value.

Get-Content C:\TEMP\DATA\split\splitme.txt | Select -First 5000 | out-File C:\temp\file1.txt -Encoding ASCII

FILE 2

Get-Content C:\TEMP\DATA\split\splitme.txt | Select -Skip 5000 | Select -First 5000 | out-File C:\temp\file2.txt -Encoding ASCII

FILE 3

Get-Content C:\TEMP\DATA\split\splitme.txt | Select -Skip 10000 | Select -First 5000 | out-File C:\temp\file3.txt -Encoding ASCII

etc…

share|improve this answer
    
thanks i ended up using this... but don't forget to add -width for outfile or it might truncate your output at 80 chars... also this operates one line at a time ... is faster to use gc -readcount 1000 | select -first 5 ... this does 1000 lines at a time ... finally gc will read the whole file and select will ignore most of it ... a little faster to include the -totalcount param with gc to stop after certain number of lines ... can do -tail for end of file too – TCC Jun 4 '14 at 21:23

My requirement was a bit different. I often work with Comma Delimited and Tab Delimited ASCII files where a single line is a single record of data. And they're really big, so I need to split them into manageable parts (whilst preserving the header row).

So, I reverted back to my classic VBScript method and bashed together a small .vbs script that can be run on any Windows computer (it gets automatically executed by the WScript.exe script host engine on Window).

The benefit of this method is that it uses Text Streams, so the underlying data isn't loaded into memory (or, at least, not all at once). The result is that it's exceptionally fast and it doesn't really need much memory to run. The test file I just split using this script on my i7 was about 1 GB in file size, had about 12 million lines of text and was split into 25 part files (each with about 500k lines each) – the processing took about 2 minutes and it didn’t go over 3 MB memory used at any point.

The caveat here is that it relies on the text file having "lines" (meaning each record is delimited with a CRLF) as the Text Stream object uses the "ReadLine" function to process a single line at a time. But hey, if you're working with TSV or CSV files, it's perfect.

Option Explicit

Private Const INPUT_TEXT_FILE = "c:\bigtextfile.txt"  
Private Const REPEAT_HEADER_ROW = True                
Private Const LINES_PER_PART = 500000                 

Dim oFileSystem, oInputFile, oOutputFile, iOutputFile, iLineCounter, sHeaderLine, sLine, sFileExt, sStart

sStart = Now()

sFileExt = Right(INPUT_TEXT_FILE,Len(INPUT_TEXT_FILE)-InstrRev(INPUT_TEXT_FILE,".")+1)
iLineCounter = 0
iOutputFile = 1

Set oFileSystem = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Set oInputFile = oFileSystem.OpenTextFile(INPUT_TEXT_FILE, 1, False)
Set oOutputFile = oFileSystem.OpenTextFile(Replace(INPUT_TEXT_FILE, sFileExt, "_" & iOutputFile & sFileExt), 2, True)

If REPEAT_HEADER_ROW Then
    iLineCounter = 1
    sHeaderLine = oInputFile.ReadLine()
    Call oOutputFile.WriteLine(sHeaderLine)
End If

Do While Not oInputFile.AtEndOfStream
    sLine = oInputFile.ReadLine()
    Call oOutputFile.WriteLine(sLine)
    iLineCounter = iLineCounter + 1
    If iLineCounter Mod LINES_PER_PART = 0 Then
        iOutputFile = iOutputFile + 1
        Call oOutputFile.Close()
        Set oOutputFile = oFileSystem.OpenTextFile(Replace(INPUT_TEXT_FILE, sFileExt, "_" & iOutputFile & sFileExt), 2, True)
        If REPEAT_HEADER_ROW Then
            Call oOutputFile.WriteLine(sHeaderLine)
        End If
    End If
Loop

Call oInputFile.Close()
Call oOutputFile.Close()
Set oFileSystem = Nothing

Call MsgBox("Done" & vbCrLf & "Lines Processed:" & iLineCounter & vbCrLf & "Part Files: " & iOutputFile & vbCrLf & "Start Time: " & sStart & vbCrLf & "Finish Time: " & Now())
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