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Can somebody please explain to me the difference between:

Session.Add("name",txtName.text); and Session["name"] = txtName.text;

It was an interview question and I answered that both store data in key = "Value" format like Dictionary class in C#.

Am I right, or is there any difference?

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2  
I'm sure there's some nice msdn documentation regarding this. Perhaps you could research it yourself and be better prepared for the next interview. –  jpm Apr 4 '12 at 19:33
10  
That is a terrible interview question. –  Eric Lippert Apr 4 '12 at 20:29
2  
@EricLippert, I completely agree. Process of hiring a developer is highly broken at most organizations. –  SolutionYogi Apr 4 '12 at 20:38
    
@EricLippert If nothing else, it throws up flags for inexperienced developers who may not know the two are identical. IMO most web devs should know this. But in general yes it's a weak question. –  KP. Apr 5 '12 at 12:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looking at the code for HttpSessionState shows us that they are in fact the same.

public sealed class HttpSessionState : ICollection, IEnumerable
{
    private IHttpSessionState _container;
...
    public void Add(string name, object value)
    {
        this._container[name] = value;
    }

    public object this[string name]
    {
        get
        {
            return this._container[name];
        }
        set
        {
            this._container[name] = value;
        }
    }
...
}

As for them both

storing data in key = "Value" format like Dictionary class in C#.

They actually store the result in an IHttpSessionState.

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This is a great answer because it shows in code exactly why the two functions are equivalent which helps to internalize the concept. I like the note in another Comment by @matthew about Dictionary, because I've been thinking all along that we were using a Dictionary or other hash table in session state, and frankly I've always done the silly dance to check to see if a value already existed before either adding or modifying based on that. –  TonyG Dec 24 '13 at 22:06

The two code snippets you posted are one and the same in functionality. Both update (or create if it doesn't exist) a certain Session object defined by the key.

Session.Add("name",txtName.text);

is the same as:

Session["name"] = txtName.text;

The first is method-based, where the second is string indexer-based. Both overwrite the previous value held by the key.

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2  
In contrast to a Dictionary, if you try and Add to a dictionary twice with the same key, it will throw an exception. The indexer of a Dictionary works similarly to the Session object (it will either add or update, and will not throw an exception). –  Matthew Apr 4 '12 at 20:02
    
@Matthew great additional note... –  KP. Apr 5 '12 at 12:23
    
@Mathew - Thanks for the extra note –  kumarch1 Jul 9 '13 at 5:24
Session["uname"]=TextBox1.Text ; 

It uses an indexer to assign the data. The indexer refers to the particular row of the session object. The key "uname" is used to identify the row.

Assigning data using an indexer is faster and more efficient than assigning the data using the method--

Session.Add("uname",TextBox1.Text)
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And where do you actually answer the question by stating what the difference is? –  Servy Apr 4 '12 at 19:47
    
-1 This is a good explanation of how Session works but I am afraid this does not answer the question. –  Icarus Apr 4 '12 at 19:54
1  
Why would it be more efficient, if it does exactly the same thing? Indexer is actually just a normal method, only defined and called using weird syntax. Actually, the IL of Add() and setter of the indexer is exactly the same, so the indexer can't be faster. –  svick Apr 4 '12 at 22:49

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