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I've got a problem in an Oracle function execution. I've a table loginfo(username,password,type) and I've a function like this:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION login(name in varchar2,pass in varchar2 )
    RETURN integer
    IS 
    v_type integer;
    BEGIN 
    Select loginfo.type 
    INTO v_type from loginfo
    where loginfo.username=name 
    and loginfo.password=pass;
    RETURN (v_type); 
    END;

I've two types of loginfo; type 1 and 2. If I call this function from php with a parameter that should return type 1 it does. When I call this function with a parameter that should return type 2 it returns the error OCI_NO_DATA in the PHP page. However, when I call function from Oracle it returns 2.

It should return type 2 when my parameters are username = '8801716560946' and password = '123456'.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

OCI_NO_DATA implies that there are no rows that match the parameters you've passed in in the table. I'll wager that you're passing different parameters when you call the function from PHP. Perhaps you're passing in strings with some additional spaces in one case and not the other, for example.

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@AwladLiton - But what values are you providing for the username and password bind variables? The error strongly implies that the bind variable values are different when you're using PHP (or that you inserted the row it is supposed to find in the same Oracle session you're running the function in and haven't committed) –  Justin Cave Apr 4 '12 at 21:17
    
thanks Cave. i find out that it works it don't work if my parameters are like numbers.that means if username='123456789' and password='123' it didn't return any values. if i gave parameters like username='awlad' and password='awlad'it worked... i'm surprised! –  Awlad Liton Apr 4 '12 at 21:31
    
@AwladLiton - Assuming that the database columns are both defined as VARCHAR2 and both sets of data exist in the table and there are no extra spaces anywhere and there are no leading zeros in your numbers, I'd guess that you're specifying the wrong data type when you bind the data in PHP. –  Justin Cave Apr 4 '12 at 21:38
    
i took value like this: $user = $_POST['username']; if i get username like 01456789 then $user act like a Number type variable. how can i defined that $user is a string? –  Awlad Liton Apr 4 '12 at 21:39

You should add some exception handler in your code.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION login(name in varchar2,pass in varchar2 ) RETURN integer IS 
  v_type integer;
BEGIN      
Select loginfo.type 
INTO v_type from loginfo
where loginfo.username=name 
and loginfo.password=pass;
RETURN (v_type); 
 exception when no_data_found then 
    return null;
END;

This way you are guarantee to have a value returned by the function. In a production environment, you also want to use packages as there many advantages to them.

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