Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

here I guess the tag is a variable and it is checking for 9eaf.... but, does this exist in perl, I mean what is the "=~" sign doing here. and what is the "/" before and after 9eaf doing ??

if($tag =~ /9eaf/ )
 {

do something

}

Please, let me know if someone has any clue about those two parameters.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Sinan Ünür, Richard Simões, tchrist, brian d foy, Jack Maney Apr 5 '12 at 3:40

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
If you want to spend a few minutes learning about regular expressions in Perl have a look at perlrequick. –  Sebastian Stumpf Apr 4 '12 at 21:00
6  
This is a trivial documentation lookup and has no place on SO. –  Richard Simões Apr 4 '12 at 21:27
1  
Learning Perl explains it all :) –  brian d foy Apr 4 '12 at 23:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

"=~" is the operator testing a regular expression match. The expression /9eaf/ is a regular expression (the slashes // are delimiters, the 9eaf is the actual regular expression). In words, the test is saying "If the variable $tag matches the regular expression /9eaf/ ..." and this match occurs if the string stored in $tag contains those characters 9eaf consecutively, in order, at any point. So this will be true for the strings

9eaf

xyz9eaf

9eafxyz

xyz9eafxyz

and many others, but not the strings

9eaxxx 9xexaxfx

and many others. Look up the 'perlre' man page for more information on regular expressions, or google "perl regular expression".

share|improve this answer
    
You mean if there is a space in between it does not work... for example... 9sssbt yyuuiihh 88880099 9eaf 888hhjjj nnmmmm. Will the above logic for this string??? –  Invictus Apr 4 '12 at 21:07
1  
No, m// is the <strike>operation</strike>operator testing the regex. =~ simply tells m// (and s/// and tr//) which variable to test against. –  ikegami Apr 4 '12 at 21:53
1  
No, /9eaf/ is not the regular expression. /9eaf/ is the match operator. 9eaf is the regular expression. –  ikegami Apr 4 '12 at 21:54

That checks for a match of the scalar $tag (which is presumably a string) against the regular expression /9eaf/, which merely checks to see if the string "9eaf" is a substring of $tag. Check out perldoc perlretut.

share|improve this answer
    
You mean if there is a space in between it does not work... for example... 9sssbt yyuuiihh 88880099 9eaf 888hhjjj nnmmmm. Will the above logic for this string??? –  Invictus Apr 4 '12 at 21:09
    
Why don't you try it for yourself? –  Jack Maney Apr 4 '12 at 21:38

The '=~' operator is a binary binding operator that indicates the following operation will search or modify the scalar on the left.

The default (unspecified) operator is 'm' for match.

The matching operator has a pair of characters that designate where the regular expression begins and ends. Most commonly, this is '//'.

Give Perl Re tutorial a read.

share|improve this answer

The code is testing whether 9eaf is a substring of the value of $tag.


$tag =~ /9eaf/

is short for

$tag =~ m/9eaf/

where m// is the match operator. It matches the regular expression pattern (regexp) 9eaf against the value bound by =~ (returned by the left hand side of =~).


Operators, including m// and =~, are documented in perlop.

Regular expressions (e.g. 9eaf) are documented in perlre, perlretut.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.