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I've noticed that my code errors out on sqlWrite.ExecuteNonQuery(); after executing 200 Insert queries in couple of seconds. I always thought that using will make sure the resources are reused properly and there will be no need to do anything. This is the first time I get this error and I've been dealing with sql/c# for almost 3 years doing different things.

using (SqlConnection varConnection = Locale.sqlConnectOneTime(Locale.sqlDataConnectionDetails)) 
{
    using (var sqlWrite = new SqlCommand(preparedCommand, varConnection)) 
    {
        sqlWrite.Parameters.AddWithValue("@var_agr_fname", var_agr_fname == "" ? (object) DBNull.Value : var_agr_fname);
        sqlWrite.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}


public static SqlConnection sqlConnectOneTime(string varSqlConnectionDetails)
{
    var sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(varSqlConnectionDetails);
    try
    {
        sqlConnection.Open();
    }
    catch
    {
        DialogResult result = MessageBox.Show(new Form {TopMost = true},
                                              "Błąd połączenia z bazą danych. Czy chcesz spróbować nawiązac połączenie ponownie?",
                                              "Błąd połączenia (000001)",
                                              MessageBoxButtons.YesNo,
                                              MessageBoxIcon.Stop);
        if (result == DialogResult.No)
        {
            if (Application.MessageLoop)
            {
                Application.Exit(); // Use this since we are a WinForms app
            }
            else
            {
                Environment.Exit(1); // Use this since we are a console app
            }
        }
        else
        {
            sqlConnection = sqlConnectOneTime(varSqlConnectionDetails);
        }
    }
    return sqlConnection;
}

Error message: A transport-level error has occurred when sending the request to the server. (provider: Shared Memory Provider, error: 0 - No process is on the other end of the pipe.)

Considering advice for this error I should be using SqlConnection.ClearAllPools(); to make sure connections are reset or discarded properly. So I can use it but the question is where to use it and when? How to know if the limit is going to break? Where's the limit? at 50 / 150 / 200 ? or should I use it every single time in a loop?

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3  
Why not spin up only one SqlConnection and use it exclusively? It does appear you are using any threads so this should work without any hacky SqlConnection.ClearAllPools(). – Erik Philips Apr 4 '12 at 21:54
    
I have a method that I reuse by using it either once or more times. It does it all from establishing a connection (or using the one that's already connected) to returning the connection to the pool. Those are advices I got. This way I always reuse the connection if it's open and if it's closed I always open it up. Never had a problem with it till now. I thought/was told that connection pool will take care of it for me when I use using :-) Seems not :-) – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 21:57
2  
@Madboy: This sounds like you have reinvented the Connection-Pool. It always reuses connections if they are closed and cannot reuse them if they are open. Have you also seen the links in the other questions answer(not the accepted)? social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/sqldataaccess/thread/… and blogs.msdn.com/b/spike/archive/2009/04/16/… – Tim Schmelter Apr 4 '12 at 21:59
    
@AustinSalonen You're right... ugh. – Erik Philips Apr 4 '12 at 22:11
    
@ErikPhilips msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8xx3tyca.aspx it's reused when used inside using and conditions apply – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 22:23

"I have a method that I reuse by using it either once or more times. It does it all from establishing a connection (or using the one that's already connected) to returning the connection to the pool. Those are advices I got. This way I always reuse the connection if it's open and if it's closed I always open it up."

This sounds like you have reinvented the Connection-Pool. It always reuses connections if they are closed and cannot reuse them if they are open.

So close the connection in the catch block:

public static SqlConnection sqlConnectOneTime(string varSqlConnectionDetails) {
    var sqlConnection = new SqlConnection(varSqlConnectionDetails);
    try {
        sqlConnection.Open();
    } catch {
        //log and
        sqlConnection.Close();
        throw
    }
    return sqlConnection;
}

Edit: To be honest i wouldn't use such factory methods at all. They are just a source for unreproducable errors. What's so time consuming in creating and opening the connection where you're using it?

using(SqlConnection varConnection = new SqlConnection(Locale.sqlDataConnectionDetails)) {
    using (var sqlWrite = new SqlCommand(preparedCommand, varConnection)) {
        sqlWrite.Parameters.AddWithValue("@varSecus_agr_fname", varSecus_agr_fname == "" ? (object) DBNull.Value : varSecus_agr_fname);
        varConnection.Open();
        sqlWrite.ExecuteNonQuery();
    }
}

The first two links are from your linked question(not the accepted answer), they might also be helpful:

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't finally close the connection if the try is successful anyway? Returning me closed connection string anyways? Basically what your code does is open connection and close it in a second. While what my code was supposed to do is open connection so that it can be used and when done using is supposed to clean it up/return to the pool. – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 22:09
    
@Madboy: You're right, corrected. To be honest i wouldn't use such factory methods at all. They are just a source for unreproducable errors. What's so time consuming in creating and opening the connection where you're using it? – Tim Schmelter Apr 4 '12 at 22:12
    
Well I can look for it (it's somewhere in my profile questions) when I was searching for correct use of Open/Close connections it was suggested (and upvoted) that If I open Connection and not explicitly close it it will be returned to pool by using and this open connection in pool can be still reused by next queries without need to establish connection (hence being faster). If I explicitly tell it to Open and then always Close it, the next query will take as long as the first one. – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 22:15
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/2230062/… where it says that .Close is called by .Dispose and Dispose is natural when using using and also my other question stackoverflow.com/questions/2150580/… – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 22:18
    
I do understand that I could use new SqlConnection (as proposed) inside the Insert but having it in external method gives me ability to "reconnect" if it fails (warn user and give him "Reconnect Yes/No option" and it also gives me option to add some error logic. Otherwise I will have to duplicate lots of code. Also wouldn't your new SqlConnection inside the using method be exactly as my method does just in another method? After all, all I'm doing is calling another method inside using which should Dispose the connection anyways. – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 22:21

First, let me say that this code is horrible. You're mixing UI with data connection creation. What's more, you show a dialog window inside a catch section and do a recursive call! This is very messy and in itself can lead to errors and unpredictable behaviour. And (original) formatting makes it hard to read. Sorry for the harsh comment but you really should redesign this code.

Apart from that your code should work fine but if you're getting No process is on the other end of the pipe. error that means there is something wrong with your database and/or SQL Server. It looks like it gets clogged up and just does not accept any more connections. If you run batch of inserts in a short time do them on one connection if possible. ClearAllPools is a way to recover when something wrong happens and it would be best to find out what it is instead of covering that up. It's like taking paracetamol when your tooth hurts and never going to a dentist.

One other thing is that using multiple SqlConnections create separate transaction for each connection. This adds load on SQL Server although it can surely do more than hundreds of transactions per sec.

Also, you can change transport to named pipe and TCP to see if it changes anything.

share|improve this answer
    
It's generally happening on 3 different computers so it's not server related or at least not something I can see. ON Microsoft page msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8xx3tyca.aspx#Y1790 they suggest that if the connection string is the same the connection will stay open for next connections to come. So if I'm doing them all in one foreach loop it's probably one connection only. Of course the method is a bit short example since there's about 20 parameters instead of just 1. But that hasn't affected it earlier. And the problem starts at 180 insert. – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 22:46
    
It is true that real DB connection will stay open and be reused but creating SqlConnection hundreds of times per few seconds and then leaving it for garbage collector is an unnecessary strain on resources (GC mainly) – Maciej Dopieralski Apr 4 '12 at 22:51
    
Do some testing - introduce a delay between Inserts and see what happens. Also see if it changes to make all Inserts on one connection. – Maciej Dopieralski Apr 4 '12 at 22:56
    
I did try with 50ms sleep no go. Also I checked and there are only 3 connections made to the database (1-2 made in SQL Management Studio and 1 during the loop. So the connection is reused properly (it seems). – MadBoy Apr 4 '12 at 23:04
    
Another idea: change transport to named pipe and tcp to check if it helps – Maciej Dopieralski Apr 4 '12 at 23:18
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Those 2 errors:

A transport-level error has occurred when sending the request to the server. (provider: TCP Provider, error: 0 - An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host.)

A transport-level error has occurred when sending the request to the server. (provider: Shared Memory Provider, error: 0 - No process is on the other end of the pipe.)

Were related to DateTime value being inserted into SQL with Date before 1900 year. The Microsoft rule here is .. don't store DateTime value less then 1900 year in DateTime value in SQL. Use string instead...

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