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Could anyone please tell me why is the assert failing ?

FYI: I'm compiling this using gcc 4.6.1 on a 64-bit linux machine.

typedef union cpu_register {
    uint64 _64;
    uint32 _32;
    uint16 _16;
    uint16 _8l : 8,
           _8h : 8;
} __attribute__((packed)) cpu_register;

int main()
{
    cpu_register reg;
    reg._64 = 1;
    assert(reg._8h != reg._8l);
    return 0;
}

The value expected for reg._8h is 0 but it is same as that of reg._8l (== 1).

I got a solution to overcome this issue, but I want to know what is wrong?

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please add a language tag (C?) to your question, it will people help find your question and provide the correct solution. –  aKzenT Apr 4 '12 at 23:03
    
yup its C language, sorry it was my first post so I missed it. –  user1314006 Apr 4 '12 at 23:07
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like you wanted

uint16 _8l : 8,
       _8h : 8;

to be the low and high bits of a 16-bit integer.

But these are in a union, and each element of a union in-effect stands for the entire union. So they each refer to the same 8 bits.

You need to wrap them in a structure:

struct {
    uint16 _8l : 8,
           _8h : 8;
}

and then put this structure into the union.

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Yes, i used the struct to fix that. I got what you want to say. Thanks. –  user1314006 Apr 4 '12 at 23:15
    
Right, so to clarify: what went wrong is that you you had uint16 _8l : 8; uint16 _8h : 8; inside a union. If two variables are in a union, they refer to the same data, i.e. to the same 8 bits. Two variables in a structure refer to different data (usually adjacent). –  Max Apr 4 '12 at 23:20
    
Thanks a lot again. –  user1314006 Apr 4 '12 at 23:24
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