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I wrote a class which take two components, an random class type T and an integer, I implement it like following: In Test.h like:

    template <class A, int B>class Test { // two components, 
    private: 
        A first;
        int second;

    public:
        Test();
        Test (A,int);
    }

In Test.cpp I did:

    template <class T,int i> Test<T,i>::Test() {}
    template <class A,int i>Test<A,i>::Test(T a, int b):first(a) {second=b;}

But in Main function:

    Test<int, int >  T1; //It can not be passed
    Test<int, 4> T2; //It can not be passed 
    int x = 8;
    Test<int, x> T3 (3,4);// can not be passed

How I can declare an object instance from the above generic class?

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The proper term is "class template". The word "generic" is a bit dangerous in this context, because it has a very different meaning in other languages. –  Kerrek SB Apr 5 '12 at 0:02
    
How i can declare an object from the Test class ? This is the question. Dude, I need it.... Please –  ToBeGeek Apr 5 '12 at 0:19

2 Answers 2

You forgot the semicolon at the end of the class template definition.

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template <class T,int i> Test<T,i>::Test() {}
template <class A,int i>Test<A,i>::Test(T a, int b):first(a) {second=b;}

You need to put these two template function definitions in the header rather than the .cpp - the actual code needs to be made available to all compilation units that call these functions, not just the declaration.

Test<int, int >  T1; //It can not be passed

This is invalid, the second int is a type, but the template expects an int value

Test<int, 4> T2; //It can not be passed 

There's nothing wrong with this

int x = 8;
Test<int, x> T3 (3,4);// can not be passed

You need to make the first of these lines static const x = 8 (i.e. make x a compile-time constant) to make it a usable as a template parameter

And there's also the missing semicolon at the end of the class definition.

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Test<int, 4> T2; It is wrong. It can not be compiled... –  ToBeGeek Apr 5 '12 at 0:34
    
@user1314029 with what error? it works for me after fixing the other errors –  je4d Apr 5 '12 at 0:44
    
Undefined symbols for architecture x86_64: "Test<int, 4>::Test()", referenced from: _main in main.o ld: symbol(s) not found for architecture x86_64 clang: error: linker command failed with exit code 1 (use -v to see invocation) –  ToBeGeek Apr 5 '12 at 0:46
    
@user1314029 ah, i missed the fact that you had your constructors in a .cpp file. Updated my answer. –  je4d Apr 5 '12 at 0:49
1  
To be pedantic.. Test<int, 4> T2; could be compiled, but it cased an error when linking. –  je4d Apr 5 '12 at 0:54

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