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I'm using happy.js for form validation. When an error occurs, a span with the class "unhappyMessage" will be placed directly before the form element that did not pass validation. The html ends up looking something like this:

<form id="myForm">
  <label for="text1">Label 1</label><br />
  <span id="text1_unhappy" class="unhappyMessage">Error message</span>
  <input id="text1" type="text" />
  <br />
  <label for="text2">Label 2</label><br />
  <span id="text2_unhappy" class="unhappyMessage">Error message</span>
  <input id="text2" type="text" />
</form>

The <span>s don't show up until an error occurs. I would like to use css to somehow filter the error messages to the top of the parent, as if it were coded like this:

<form id="myForm">
  <span id="text1_unhappy" class="unhappyMessage">Error message</span><br />
  <span id="text2_unhappy" class="unhappyMessage">Error message</span><br />
  <label for="text1">Label 1</label><br />
  <input id="text1" type="text" />
  <br />
  <label for="text2">Label 2</label><br />
  <input id="text2" type="text" />
</form>

Note that I would like to make each .unhappyMessage appear on its own line as well. Is there a css-only way to do this?

Note: for those of you who are wondering, I want to use css only because I would have to do some reverse engineering in order to get this working with javascript, since it seems the only event I'm provided through happy.js is not the only time that error messages are created.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Css wont provide a solution for you. Look for another form validator if you have no easy access into the event delegation. Or look into the code to see if you can figure out a work around.

Edit:
looking at the happy.js page it provides a callback function for you to specify if you wish.

unHappy (function): A callback that gets triggered when form submission is attempted but any fields fail validation.

So pass a function that prepends all the error messages.

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That's the callback I'm using. It seems like it only gets called when the form is actually submitted, which is less frequently than the error messages are edited. –  benekastah Apr 5 '12 at 1:17
    
The script is fairly short, just make the part of the script that searches for errors to call the unhappy callback as well. –  Mike Depies Apr 5 '12 at 1:30
    
Eventually I just decided to register callback for the blur event for each form element. At that point I find any new error messages and move them into a separate container at the top of the form. –  benekastah Apr 5 '12 at 1:39
    
reasonable solution. Hope all works out from here on. –  Mike Depies Apr 5 '12 at 3:02

It depends what you mean by "the top" if you want them to appear at the top of the markup like in your example, then this is not possible with CSS, but can be achieved with a small amount of JS.

Alternatively, if you want them to appear at the top of their parent, then this can be done with CSS. Something like this should do:

parent {
    position:relative;
}

.unhappyMessage {
    position:absolute;
    display:block;
    z-index:20;
}

I've not tested it so it might need some tweaking, but in principle this should cause any elements with the class 'unhappyMessage' to be positioned relative to the top of their parent container (you need to change the parent rule to reflect the actual parent element).

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Yes, I want them positioned to the top of the parent, edited my question for clarity. I thought of this too, but I couldn't think of a way to prevent error messages from overlapping each other and other form elements. Can overlapping be avoided? There could be anywhere between 0-x error messages displaying at any given time. –  benekastah Apr 5 '12 at 1:16
    
Yeah I did think about that, but the only way to have them non overlapping is to have them set to display:inline or display:block which will set them straight back where they were. Would it be possible to put all the errors into another container that was relatively positioned to the top, in which the errors were displayed inline? –  Dan Prince Apr 5 '12 at 1:18
    
Yeah. That's what I'm doing now. I got it working properly, which is good because it looks like there isn't really a substitute for javascript in this case. –  benekastah Apr 5 '12 at 1:36
    
Great! CSS is getting better, but there are some things that it will probably never be able to do and modifying existing markup is one them ;) –  Dan Prince Apr 5 '12 at 1:43

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