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The task is to write a program which prompts for a filename and then produces a concordance of that file. Ex. A concordance is an alphabetical index that shows the lines in a document where each word occurs. For example, a concordance for this paragraph might appear as:

Word          Line Number
a             1 1 2
alphabetical  1
an            1
appear        2

Here I make a list so that I can sort the words.

I have this code:

f = open(raw_input("Enter a filename: "), "r")
myDict = {}
linenum = 0

for line in f:
line = line.strip()
line = line.lower()
line = line.split()
linenum += 1

for word in line:
    word = word.strip()
    word = word.lower()
    myDict[word] = linenum

    if word in myDict:
        myDict.sort()
    else:
        myDict.append(word)

print "%-15s %-15s" %("Word", "Line Number")
print "%-15s %-15d" %(myDict.keys(), myDict.values())

When I run the program now it says 'dict' has no attribute 'sort'. Can you explain this please?

The file is the same as the example and the output should also be the example from above. I'm very new at python please help :[

share|improve this question
    
It means exactly what it says. Python dictionaries are unordered and the dict type has no sort method. What you can do is call .keys() or .values() (depending on which one you want, naturally) on the dictionary object and sort the result. – Joel Cornett Apr 5 '12 at 3:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think it makes sense to use a dict, but you'll have to add a key along with each value you add to the dict. For example:

>>> dict = {}
>>> dict["apple"] = "red"
>>> dict["banana"] = "yellow"
>>> dict
{'apple': 'red', 'banana': 'yellow'}

In this example, the keys are "apple" and "banana", and the values are "red" and "yellow". Since this is homework, I'll leave it up to you to determine appropriate keys and values for your assignment.

Also, this line is problematic:

for word in line:

line is a string, so you're actually looking at each character in line, rather than each word. You'll have to find some way to transform line into a list of words...

Lastly, your final statement will only print the last word read. You're building a dict, but you're not printing the dict, you're printing a single value. Once you build the dict, you should print the dict itself.


myDict[word] = linenum

if word in myDict:
    myDict.sort()
else:
    myDict.append(word)

You're on the right path, but sorting the dictionary isn't the right way to handle words that appear more than once (furthermore, dict doesn't have a sort method, which is why you're getting an error, but even if it did, you wouldn't need it here). Also, once you assign a value to a key, it's added to the dictionary, so it's already been "appended".

In your example, the word a appears 3 times, and the output lists each line it appears in, so you'll need a way to store a list of lines for each word.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for that. I fixed it. I understand if you don't want to help me more and I accepted your answer, but there is some confusion left if you don't mind helping me a little more :] – Kim Y Apr 5 '12 at 2:37
1  
@KimY Well, you're transforming the line correctly, and you chose a good key. I'll address the other stuff in my answer. – Slace Diamond Apr 5 '12 at 2:50
1  
@KimY The main hint is "you'll need a list of lines for each word". That's probably the most important part of the assignment and the least intuitive. Array/dict values don't necessarily have to be static values... – Slace Diamond Apr 5 '12 at 3:24
    
thanks so much! this was taking forever until you showed up :] – Kim Y Apr 5 '12 at 3:58
    
@KimY you're welcome, just be sure that you understand the concept of multi-dimensional arrays – Slace Diamond Apr 5 '12 at 4:03

Do you want myDict to just be a list? If so, declare it as myDict = []. A list has sort and append functions, but a dictionary doesn’t.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the fix. when i run the program again, it doesn't give the expected output and prints something completely different. – Kim Y Apr 5 '12 at 2:01
1  
@KimY Ah, that's because your print statement is only printing a singular word and a singular linenum right now. You'll want to have some sort of loop that iterates over the elements of myDict and prints each line. Similarly, you'll want myDict to actually be a dict (declare it as {}) and instead do myDict[word].append(linenum). You might need to initialize each value in that dict as myDict[word] = [] before you can append. – Squazic Apr 5 '12 at 2:49

you can easily sort the order of the dictionary this way:

f = open(raw_input("Enter a filename: "), "r")
myDict = {}
linenum = 0

for line in f:
  line = line.strip()
  line = line.lower()
  line = line.split()
  linenum += 1

  for word in line:
    word = word.strip()
    word = word.lower()

    if not word in myDict:
      myDict[word] = [] 

    myDict[word].append(linenum)


print "%-15s %-15s" %("Word", "Line Number")
for key in sorted(myDict):
  print '%-15s: %-15d' % (key, myDict(key))

Hope it helps Jordi

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