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Since now, I'm using this loop to iterate over the elements of an array, which works fine even if I put objects with various properties inside of it.

var cubes[];

    for (i in cubes){
    cubes[i].dimension
    cubes[i].position_x
    ecc..
    }

Now, let's suppose cubes[ ] is declared this way

var cubes[][];

Can I do this in javascript? How can I then automatically iterate in

cubes[0][0]
cubes[0][1]
cubes[0][2]
cubes[1][0]
cubes[1][1]
cubes[1][2]
cubes[2][0]
ecc...

As a turnaround, I can just declare:

var cubes[];
var cubes1[];

and work separately with the two arrays. Is this a better solution?

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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do something like this:

var cubes = [
 [1, 2, 3],
 [4, 5, 6],    
 [7, 8, 9],
];

for(var i = 0; i < cubes.length; i++) {
    var cube = cubes[i];
    for(var j = 0; j < cube.length; j++) {
        display("cube[" + i + "][" + j + "] = " + cube[j]);
    }
}

Working jsFiddle:

The output of the above:

cube[0][0] = 1
cube[0][1] = 2
cube[0][2] = 3
cube[1][0] = 4
cube[1][1] = 5
cube[1][2] = 6
cube[2][0] = 7
cube[2][1] = 8
cube[2][2] = 9
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Your solution only works with 2D arrays, but I've found a way to loop through arrays with any number of dimensions: stackoverflow.com/a/15854485/975097 –  Anderson Green Jul 20 '13 at 22:15
    
@AndersonGreen OP was specifically looking for 2D arrays, thus the above answer. Thanks for the link though - hope it helps someone looking for a similar solution in the future! –  icyrock.com Jul 20 '13 at 23:57
    
Hi, how to get result like 1,4,7,1,4,8,1,4,9,1,5,7,1,5,8.... –  Bharadwaj Aug 1 '13 at 11:26
    
@Bharadwaj That's a whole new question - see this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/4331092/… –  icyrock.com Aug 2 '13 at 0:15
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Try this:

var i, j;

for (i = 0; i < cubes.length; i++) {
    for (j = 0; j < cubes[i].length; j++) {
       do whatever with cubes[i][j];
    }
}
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That will create global variables. –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 5 '12 at 2:26
1  
Added var i, j; In fairness, he didn't say, "Don't create global variables." ;-) –  Michael Rice Apr 5 '12 at 2:29
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var cubes = [["string", "string"], ["string", "string"]];

for(var i = 0; i < cubes.length; i++) {
    for(var j = 0; j < cubes[i].length; j++) {
        console.log(cubes[i][j]);
    }
}
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He asked how to iterate it. –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 5 '12 at 2:26
    
And he asked "Can I do this in javascript?" –  binarious Apr 5 '12 at 2:26
    
You edited your answer after my comment. Your original post had nothing about iteration. –  Matthew Flaschen Apr 5 '12 at 2:29
    
I always post parts and edit it with next steps. –  binarious Apr 5 '12 at 2:30
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JavaScript does not have such declarations. It would be:

var cubes = ...

regardless

But you can do:

for(var i = 0; i < cubes.length; i++)
{
  for(var j = 0; j < cubes[i].length; j++)
  {

  }
}

Note that JavaScript allows jagged arrays, like:

[
  [1, 2, 3],
  [1, 2, 3, 4]
]

since arrays can contain any type of object, including an array of arbitrary length.

As noted by MDC:

"for..in should not be used to iterate over an Array where index order is important"

If you use your original syntax, there is no guarantee the elements will be visited in numeric order.

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