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i'm trying to understand a concept and an error. what's wrong with this?

class A
{
public:
    A()
    {
        std::function<void(int)> testFunc(&A::func);
    }

private:
    void func(int) {}
}

my question, is it possible to create any sort of object that is able to call a member of a specific instance where std::function acts like a member function pointer, except without the wacky type definition that can't be used as function parameters in inheriting classes. for example:

class A
{
public:
    A()
    {
         index[WM_CREATE] = &A::close;
         index[WM_DESTROY] = &A::destroy;
    }

protected:
    map<UINT msg, void (A::*)(HWND, UINT , WPARAM, LPARAM)> index;
    void close(HWND,UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);
    void destroy(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B()
    {
        index[WM_CREATE] = &B::create; // error because it's not a pointer of type A::*
    }
private:
    void create(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);

};

I'm thinking i'm on the right track of using std::functions like so:

class A
{
public:             //         Gigantic stl error with these two
    A()             //                         |
    {               //                         V
         index[WM_CREATE] = std::function<void(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM>(&A::close);
         index[WM_DESTROY] = std::function<void(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM>(&A::destroy);
    }

protected:
    map<UINT msg, std::function<void(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM)> > index;
    void close(HWND,UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);
    void destroy(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);
};

class B : public A
{
public:                    //               and this one
    B()                    //                     |
    {                      //                     V
        index[WM_CREATE] = std::function<void(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM)>(&B::create);
    }
private:
    void create(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);

};

if someone could explain what these giant cryptic errors mean and how to fix them, i would greatly appreciate it.

share|improve this question
    
When you say "call a member of a specific instance where std::function acts like a member function pointer", does that mean that the specific instance is specified at the time of creation of the std::function object? This is what the void(int) signature suggests, but then the result object would not act "like a member function pointer", it would act like a callback / functor. If on the other hand you meant that the resulting std::function object really acts like a member function pointer, then the signature is wrong (e.g. it could be void(A&, int) instead). Which is it? –  Luc Danton Apr 5 '12 at 4:56
    
not sure what a callback/ functor is, but it kinda sounds like we're differentiating between a static functions and a non-static functions, and i want it to be a non-static function. They're handlers so they need to be able to manipulate only this instances members. As in the examples, i want that function to be called when the corresponding map index is passed in. simply, i wish to do this: index[WM_CREATE](hwnd, msg, lparam, wparam); and the only way i can think to do that is store function pointers or something similar there.I can't do actual pointers though because it breaks inheritance :( –  FatalCatharsis Apr 5 '12 at 5:05
    
Can't you use std::mem_fun instead? –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 5 '12 at 5:22
    
never heard of it. might you be able to post in an answer what it's use in this might be? –  FatalCatharsis Apr 5 '12 at 12:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think the problem you are having is that a member function requires not only a function pointer, but a pointer to the calling object. In other words, member functions have an additional implicit argument that is the pointer to the calling object.

To set a member function to a std::function, you need to use std::bind like this:

std::function<void(int)> testFunc(std::bind(&A::func, this, _1));

This binds the this pointer of the current A instance to the function so it has the function pointer and the object instance, which is enough information to properly call the function. The _1 argument indicates that the first explicit argument will be provided when the function is called.

share|improve this answer
    
error C2065: '_1' : undeclared identifier. I called it like HandlerIndex[WM_CREATE] = std::function<void(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM)>(std::bind(&BasicWindow::MsgCreate, this, _1)) –  FatalCatharsis Apr 5 '12 at 12:33
    
You need a placeholder for every argument, so it would be: std::function<void(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM)>(std::bind(&BasicWindow::MsgCreate, this, _1, _2, _3, _4)) –  Jason B Apr 5 '12 at 13:59
    
ah gotcha, i'll try it when i'm home in a bit. –  FatalCatharsis Apr 5 '12 at 19:50
    
now i get unknown identifier for all 4 of those last parameters. just underscore1 right? –  FatalCatharsis Apr 5 '12 at 20:51
1  
Yeah, one underscore. You may need to use std::placeholders::_1 and so on for each argument. –  Jason B Apr 5 '12 at 21:27

my question, is it possible to create any sort of object that is able to call a member of a specific instance

In this case the only information that is missing is in fact what specific instance the std::function object should use: &A::func can't be used on its own (for instance (this->*&A::func)(0) uses &A::func with instance *this). Try:

std::function<void(int)> testFunc = std::bind(&A::func, this);

(Be careful that std::bind(&A::func, *this) and std::bind(&A::func, this) have slightly different semantics.)

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