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In C++ following is valid

    int *p = new int[3];
    *p=0;
    *(++p)=1;

Also following is valid

    int j[] = { 0, 1, 2};
    *j = 3;

Given, *j =3 works, Why is following invalid

    *(++j)=4;//invalid.. lvalue required as increment operand
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2  
j is constant pointer to start array –  turbanoff Apr 5 '12 at 5:14
3  
@turbanoff: no, j is an array type, not a pointer type. –  dreamlax Apr 5 '12 at 5:29
2  
Note *(j + 1) is okay because you aren't trying to modify j itself. –  Jesse Good Apr 5 '12 at 5:31
    
excellent point, ty –  Jimm Apr 5 '12 at 5:42

2 Answers 2

In an expression like this

*(++j)=4;//invalid.. lvalue required as increment operand

j which is an array int[3] "decays" to a pointer to the first element of that array. That pointer is an rvalue, and can't be assigned, therefore you can't do things like *(++j).

In your other example p is a pointer which is non const and can be assigned:

 int *p = new int[3];
 *p=0;
 *(++p)=1;

The behavior you obtain with the rvalue is similar to what would happen with a const pointer:

 int const *p = new int[3];
 *p=0;
 *(++p)=1;
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I think you are making the same mistake as the downvoted answer. j is an array, and you can't increment arrays. –  Jesse Good Apr 5 '12 at 6:34
    
j decays to a pointer but it's not constant as in const, it's just an rvalue. rvalues of non-class type are never const. –  Charles Bailey Apr 5 '12 at 6:35
    
@Charles Bailey: OK, I corrected. Is it better like this ? –  Cedric H. Apr 5 '12 at 7:01
    
Yes, your answer is much more accurate now. –  Charles Bailey Apr 5 '12 at 8:18

Arrays and pointers are similar, but this is one place where they are not.

If you want to iterate over an array, use a separate pointer variable:

int j[] = { 0, 1, 2};    
int* jp = j;

jp then points to the first element of j. Then:

*(++jp) = 4;

will work.

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