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import java.util.Random;

public class knife {

    static Random randGen = new Random();
    public static void main(String[] args) {

            int kniferpd = 1;
            int knifebullet = 0;

            int charstrength = 10;
            int charlightcc = 10;

            int hit = randGen.nextInt(10) + 1 + charlightcc;
            int crit = randGen.nextInt(100) + 1 + charlightcc;
            int knifedmg = randGen.nextInt(5) + 6;

            if (hit < 10) 
            System.out.println("You missed!");
            else if (hit > 10 && crit > 98);
            System.out.println("Critical strike of " + knifedmg * 2 + "dmg.");
            else if (hit > 10 && crit < 98);
            System.out.println("Strike of " + knifedmg + "dmg.");

            {

    }
}
}

When I wrote this code I get the error stated below, I dunno whats wrong! This is my error, they apear on the "else if" in the bottom.

Syntax error on token "else", while expected

share|improve this question
    
Indent your code, it will make it more readable. And it's a good idea to always use braces for conditionnal statements and loops, a quality insurance matter. – Snicolas Apr 5 '12 at 7:01
    
I personally kind of like omitting the braces in some cases, as I feel they are just superfluous visual clutter (in some cases). However, the official java coding conventions mandate that braces should always be used for if statements. Hence, I always brace my ifs, even if I sometimes feel an urge to omit the braces. – Alderath Apr 5 '12 at 7:14
    
as sidenote, int hit = randGen.nextInt(10) + 1 + charlightcc; will always result in hits if you use charlightcc of 10, not sure thats intended behaviour – Peter Apr 5 '12 at 7:40

Remove the ; after the if statements

Do this

if (hit < 10) 
     System.out.println("You missed!");
else if (hit > 10 && crit > 98)
    System.out.println("Critical strike of " + knifedmg * 2 + "dmg.");
else if (hit > 10 && crit < 98)
    System.out.println("Strike of " + knifedmg + "dmg.");

or that

if (hit < 10) {
     System.out.println("You missed!");
}
else if (hit > 10 && crit > 98) {
    System.out.println("Critical strike of " + knifedmg * 2 + "dmg.");
}
else if (hit > 10 && crit < 98) {
    System.out.println("Strike of " + knifedmg + "dmg.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh! I understand! I didn't understand that you meant me to remove all of the ;'s! Thank you! – Emil Apr 5 '12 at 7:03

remove ; from the end of the line with if

share|improve this answer

Just a little mistake ...

        if (hit < 10) 
             System.out.println("You missed!");
        else if (hit > 10 && crit > 98);  // <-- No ; here
             System.out.println("Critical strike of " + knifedmg * 2 + "dmg.");
        else if (hit > 10 && crit < 98); // <-- No ; here
             System.out.println("Strike of " + knifedmg + "dmg.");

Just for your understanding, what you have written will be interpreted like this:

if (hit < 10) {
     System.out.println("You missed!");
} else if (hit > 10 && crit > 98) {
     ; // same as do nothing
}

System.out.println("Critical strike of " + knifedmg * 2 + "dmg.");

else if (hit > 10 && crit < 98){ // compiler error
     ; // same as do nothing
}

System.out.println("Strike of " + knifedmg + "dmg.");
share|improve this answer

This is why it's almost always better to use {} for if statement even if you don't strictly need them. If you add the {} it's obvious what's going on..

If we re-format your code a litle:

import java.util.Random;

public class knife {

    static Random randGen = new Random();
    public static void main(String[] args) {

            int kniferpd = 1;
            int knifebullet = 0;

            int charstrength = 10;
            int charlightcc = 10;

            int hit = randGen.nextInt(10) + 1 + charlightcc;
            int crit = randGen.nextInt(100) + 1 + charlightcc;
            int knifedmg = randGen.nextInt(5) + 6;

            if (hit < 10) {
                System.out.println("You missed!");
            } else if (hit > 10 && crit > 98);

            System.out.println("Critical strike of " + knifedmg * 2 + "dmg.");

            else if (hit > 10 && crit < 98); // this doesn't make sense

            System.out.println("Strike of " + knifedmg + "dmg.");

            {

    }
}
}

Formatted correctly with corrections

import java.util.Random;

public class knife {

    static Random randGen = new Random();
    public static void main(String[] args) {

            int kniferpd = 1;
            int knifebullet = 0;

            int charstrength = 10;
            int charlightcc = 10;

            int hit = randGen.nextInt(10) + 1 + charlightcc;
            int crit = randGen.nextInt(100) + 1 + charlightcc;
            int knifedmg = randGen.nextInt(5) + 6;

            if (hit < 10) {
                System.out.println("You missed!");
            } else if (hit > 10 && crit > 98) {            
                System.out.println("Critical strike of " + knifedmg * 2 + "dmg.");
            } else if (hit > 10 && crit < 98) {                
                System.out.println("Strike of " + knifedmg + "dmg.");
            }

    }
}
share|improve this answer

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